Gary Steiner

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Gary Steiner
Nationality American
Education BA (Economics, 1977)
University of California, Los Angeles
Santa Clara University School of Law (1977–1978)
BA (Philosophy, 1981)
University of California, Berkeley
PhD (Philosophy, 1992)
Yale University[1]
Occupation Philosopher
Employer Bucknell University
Website
Homepage

Gary Steiner is an American moral philosopher, and the John Howard Harris Professor of Philosophy at Bucknell University. Steiner's particular focus is animal rights, Descartes, and 19th- and 20th-century continental philosophy. He is the author of Descartes as a Moral Thinker (2004), Anthropocentrism and its Discontents (2005), and Animals and the Moral Community (2008).[1]

Works[edit]

Books
  • Descartes As a Moral Thinker: Christianity, Technology, Nihilism. Humanity Books, 2004.
  • Anthropocentrism and Its Discontents: The Moral Status of Animals in the History of Western Philosophy. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2005.
  • Animals and the Moral Community: Mental Life, Moral Status, and Kinship. Columbia University Press, 2008.
  • Animals and the Limits of Postmodernism. Columbia University Press (forthcoming).
Translations
  • Klaus Hartmann. "Marx's Capital from the Viewpoint of Transcendental Philosophy," Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 24, 1993, pp. 157–171.
  • Karl Löwith. Martin Heidegger and European Nihilism. Columbia University Press, 1998.
  • Gerold Prauss. Knowing & Doing in Heidegger's Being & Time. Humanity Books, 1999.
Selected articles
  • "Rethinking the Cognitive Abilities of Animals," Julie A. Smith and Robert W. Mitchell (eds.). Experiencing Animals: Encounters Between Animal and Human Minds. Columbia University Press (forthcoming).
  • "Animal Rights and the Default of Postmodernism," Evangelos Protopapadakis (ed.). Animal Rights - Animal Liberation. Berlin: Logos Verlag (forthcoming).
  • Steiner, Gary. "Animal, Vegetable, Miserable", The New York Times, 21 November 2009.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Curriculum Vitae", Bucknell University, accessed 8 June 2012.

Further reading[edit]