Gary Sullivan (engineer)

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Gary J. Sullivan is an American electrical engineer who led the development of the H.264/MPEG-4 AVC and HEVC video coding standards and created the DirectX Video Acceleration (DXVA) API/DDI video decoding feature of the Microsoft Windows operating system.

He was the chairman of the Joint Video Team (JVT) standardization committee that developed the H.264/AVC standard, and he personally edited large portions of it. Since January 2010, he has been a co-chairman of the Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding (JCT-VC) and an editor for developing the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, and since July 2012 has been co-chairman of the Joint Collaborative Team on 3D Video (JCT-3V) that works on standardization of 3D video coding. He has also led and contributed to a number of other video and image related standardization projects such as extensions of ITU-T H.263 video coding and the standardization of JPEG XR image coding, and has published research work on various topics relating to video and image compression.

Biography[edit]

Sullivan was born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky, and attended the Ascension and St. Margaret Mary elementary schools and Trinity High School, graduating in 1978.[1] He received B.S. and M.Eng. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Louisville J. B. Speed School of Engineering, Kentucky, in 1982 and 1983, respectively. He received Ph.D. and Engineer degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1991.

Sullivan holds the position of Video and Image Technology Architect in the Windows Division of Microsoft Corporation.[2][3][4][5] At Microsoft he also designed and remains lead engineer for the DirectX Video Acceleration (DXVA) API/DDI video decoding feature of the Microsoft Windows operating system platform. His DXVA designs include decoding acceleration schemes for H.261, MPEG-1 Part 2, H.262/MPEG-2 Part 2, H.263, MPEG-4 Part 2, H.264/MPEG-4 Part 10: AVC, Windows Media Video versions 8 and 9, VC-1, Scalable Video Coding, Multiview Video Coding, and HEVC.

Prior to joining Microsoft in 1999, he was the manager of communications core research at PictureTel Corporation, the former world leader in videoconferencing communication. He was previously a Howard Hughes Fellow and member of technical staff in the Advanced Systems Division of Hughes Aircraft Company, and a terrain-following radar system software engineer for Texas Instruments.

Awards[edit]

Recognitions and awards for Sullivan (and the projects he has led in the standardization community) have included the following:

Leadership[edit]

Sullivan has held the following chairmanships in video coding standardization organizations:

  • Rapporteur/chairman of the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) – since 1996.
  • Chairman and co-chairman of the video part of the ISO/IEC Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) – chairman March 2001 – May 2002, co-chairman since May 2002.
  • Chairman and co-chairman of the Joint Video Team (JVT) – chairman for the development of the next generation H.264/MPEG-4 AVC video coding standard and its fidelity-range extensions (FRExt), and co-chairman for the development of the Scalable Video Coding (SVC) and Multiview Video Coding (MVC) extensions.
  • Co-chairman of Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding (JCT-VC) for developing the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard – since January 2010.
  • Co-chairman of Joint Collaborative Team on 3D Video Coding (JCT-3V) for developing 3D extensions of video coding standards – since July 2012.
  • Liaison representative to MPEG and JPEG from ITU-T on video and image coding topics.

The JVT, JCT-VC, and JCT-3V have been joint projects between the VCEG and MPEG organizations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gary Sullivan '78 wins IEEE Award". Trinity High School. August 16, 2011. Retrieved 2014-09-29. 
  2. ^ Data Compression Conference (DCC 2013), March 2013.
  3. ^ Gary J. Sullivan biography, Visual Communication and Image Processing (VCIP 2012), November 2012.
  4. ^ a b Rob Knies, Microsoft Research (2011). "Video Architect, Microsoft Research Collaborator Wins IEEE Award". Retrieved 2011-08-30. 
  5. ^ a b Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Communication Society (2011). "IEEE CCNC Panelist biographies". Retrieved 2011-02-28. 
  6. ^ CSVT Transactions – Best Paper Award, IEEE Circuits and Systems Society web site.
  7. ^ Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (2009). "SPIE Fellows: 59 New SPIE Fellows Elected". Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  8. ^ National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (2008). "Honorees Announced for 60th Annual Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards". Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  9. ^ Dolby Laboratories (2008-08-21). "Dolby Congratulates the Joint Video Team Standards Committee on Its 2008 Primetime Emmy for Developing the H.264/MPEG-4 AVC High Profile". Reuters. Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  10. ^ Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (2008). "Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Announces Recipients for the 2008 Primetime Emmy Engineering Awards". Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  11. ^ International Multimedia Telecommunications Consortium (2008). "IMTC Leadership and Service Awards". Retrieved 2012-03-24. 
  12. ^ Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (2008). "Recipients of the IEEE International Symposium on Consumer Electronics Engineering Excellence Award". Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  13. ^ Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Magazine, Volume 39, Issue 2, Feb. 2006, pp. 79-83 (2008). "IEEE Announces 2006 Fellows". Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  14. ^ ITU-T Newslog (2006). "Video Coding Work Voted Most Influential". 
  15. ^ International Committee on Technology Standards (2005). "INCITS Awards Honor Roll". 

External links[edit]

Video coding standardization organizations[edit]

Video coding standards[edit]

DirectX Video Acceleration[edit]