Gaston Thorn

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Gaston Thorn
Gaston Thorn - World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 1986.jpg
President of the European Commission
In office
20 January 1981 – 6 January 1985
Preceded by Roy Jenkins
Succeeded by Jacques Delors
Prime Minister of Luxembourg
In office
15 June 1974 – 16 July 1979
Monarch Jean
Deputy Raymond Vouel
Bernard Berg
Preceded by Pierre Werner
Succeeded by Pierre Werner
Personal details
Born 3 September 1928
Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Died 26 August 2007
Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Political party Democratic
Religion Roman Catholicism

Gaston Egmond Thorn (3 September 1928 – 26 August 2007) was a Luxembourg politician who served in a number of high-profile positions, both domestically and internationally. Amongst the posts that he held were the 20th Prime Minister of Luxembourg (1974–79), President of the United Nations General Assembly (1975), and the seventh President of the European Commission (1981–85).

Thorn was born in Luxembourg City. While still at school he engaged in resistance activities during the German occupation, and spent several months in prison. After the war he studied law in Montpellier, Lausanne and Paris, and practised law in Luxembourg before entering politics in 1959, representing the liberal Democratic Party. He was Chairman of the Democratic Party from 1961.

Thorn was Foreign Minister and Foreign Trade Minister of Luxembourg from 1969 – 1980, Prime Minister from 1974 – 1979 and Minister of Economics from 1977 to 1980. He was also a member of the European Parliament from 1959 – 1969, and President of the United Nations General Assembly from 1975 – 1976.

Thorn (second from the left) at the 1983 G7 summit

In 1980 Thorn was chosen as President of the Commission of the European Communities (now called the European Union), in succession to Roy Jenkins. He took office on 12 January 1981. He was seen as very close to the President of France, Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, and generally as a defender of French interests in European politics.

Although Thorn was not considered a very forceful Commission President, during his term of office the Commission continued to expand its power, both at the expense of the national governments of EC members, and of the European Parliament, with which the Commission engaged in a constant power struggle. In this Thorn laid the groundwork for his successor Jacques Delors, who took the Commission to the height of its power.

After leaving the Commission Presidency in 1985, Thorn went into business. He was chairman of Luxembourg's largest media company CLT and president of the Banque Internationale de Luxembourg.

Thorn remained active in international and political affairs, as President of the International European Movement and as a member of the Trilateral Commission and of the Jean Monnet Committee. He was also president of the Liberal International, a grouping of liberal political parties, and is now this organisation's President of Honour. He was married to Liliane Thorn-Petit, a journalist.

References[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Pierre Grégoire
Minister for Foreign Affairs
1969–1980
Succeeded by
Colette Flesch
Preceded by
Edzo Toxopeus
President of the Liberal International
1970–1982
Succeeded by
Giovanni Malagodi
Preceded by
Pierre Werner
Prime Minister of Luxembourg
1974–1979
Succeeded by
Pierre Werner
Preceded by
Marcel Mart
Minister for the Economy
1977–1980
Succeeded by
Colette Flesch
Preceded by
Bernard Berg
Deputy Prime Minister
1979–1980
Preceded by
Robert Krieps
Minister for Justice
1979–1980
Preceded by
Roy Jenkins
President of the European Commission
1980–1985
Succeeded by
Jacques Delors
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Abdelaziz Bouteflika
President of the United Nations General Assembly
1975–1976
Succeeded by
Hamilton Shirley Amerasinghe
Party political offices
Preceded by
Lucien Dury
President of the DP
1st time

1962–1969
Succeeded by
René Konen
Preceded by
René Konen
President of the DP
2nd time

1971–1980
Succeeded by
Colette Flesch
Academic offices
Preceded by
Bruno Kreisky
College of Europe Orateur
1982
Succeeded by
Garret FitzGerald