Gavar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For places in Iran, see Gavar, Iran.

Coordinates: 40°21′32″N 45°07′36″E / 40.35889°N 45.12667°E / 40.35889; 45.12667

Gavar
Գավառ
Gavar
Gavar
Nickname(s): Kyavar
GavarԳավառ is located in Armenia
GavarԳավառ
Gavar
Գավառ
Coordinates: 40°21′32″N 45°07′36″E / 40.35889°N 45.12667°E / 40.35889; 45.12667
Country  Armenia
Marz Gegharkunik
Established
City status
1830
1850
Government
 • Mayor Gurgen Martirosyan
Area
 • Total 16 km2 (6 sq mi)
Elevation 1,982 m (6,503 ft)
Population (2009)
 • Total 25,700
 • Density 734/km2 (1,900/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+04:00 (UTC+4)
Postal code 1201-1205
Area code(s) (+374) 264
Vehicle registration 02
Website Official site
Sources: Population [1]

Gavar (Armenian: Գավառ) is a town in Armenia and the provincial capital of the Gegharkunik Province. It was known as Nor Bayezet or Novyi Bayazet until 1959, then Kamo (named in honour of a Bolshevik of the same name) until 1996. The town is situated among the high mountains of Geghama range, with an average height of 1982 meters above sea level. It is 91 kilometers east of the capital Yerevan.

History[edit]

Hayravank Monastery near Gavar
General view

The town is situated among the mountains of Geghama range, few miles away from the western shores of Lake Sevan. It was founded in 1830 by Armenian migrants from the city of Bayazet (historically known as Daroink) of the Ottoman Empire. Being known as "New Bayazit", the settlement achieved the status of a city in 1850.

However, the area of modern-day Gavar has been inhabited since the Bronze Age. Many historical tombstones, dating back to the 2nd millennium BC are founded in Gavar. The remains of a cyclopean fort dating back to the early iron age, are found on a hill at the centre of the town. It is supposed that the fortress was the royal capital of the Araratian region of Velikukhi. It was surrounded with more than 22 minor fortifications. The region of Velikukhi was conquered by the Araratian king Sarduri II. His son, Rusa II renamed the fortress in honour of Khaldi; one of the three chief deities of Ararat.[2]

Many other medieval monuments, including Khachkars (cross-stones), gravestones and a chapel are also found in the city. Over the centuries, the area of modern-day Gavar had been severely destroyed, with the latest taking place during the 17th century, when it was ruined by Shah Abbas I of Persia.

Gavar, along with many other regions of Eastern Armenia, had become part of the USSR in 1920. After achieving the status of an urban settlement in 1950, the city had progressed gradually over the years. It was once home to 36,400 people.[3]

After the independence of Armenia in 1991, the population has declined to 23,302 as reported in the 2001 census. Much of the Soviet era infrastructure has failed and the industrial capacity has floundered. However, the local economy is improving at a slow rate as some businessmen are returning to Gavar from abroad with the hope of gaining new chances for investments. Major local manufacturers in Gavar include electronics and machinery plants, as well as textile mills.

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Gavar
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 31
(−1)
32
(0)
38
(3)
49
(9)
58
(14)
66
(19)
73
(23)
73
(23)
68
(20)
58
(14)
45
(7)
35
(2)
52.2
(11.1)
Average low °F (°C) 14
(−10)
15
(−9)
21
(−6)
29
(−2)
37
(3)
43
(6)
49
(9)
50
(10)
42
(6)
36
(2)
28
(−2)
20
(−7)
32
(0)
Precipitation inches (mm) 0.79
(20.1)
0.91
(23.1)
1.50
(38.1)
1.97
(50)
3.31
(84.1)
1.61
(40.9)
1.77
(45)
1.65
(41.9)
1.30
(33)
1.61
(40.9)
1.34
(34)
0.87
(22.1)
18.63
(473.2)
[citation needed]

Education[edit]

Gavar in winter

Education continues to be one of the main values in the society of Gavar. A literacy rate of 99% was reported as early as 1960. Nowadays, there are nine public education schools, six nursery schools, four specialized technical intermediate colleges, one sports school, two music and art schools, one special school for children with special educational needs and one university in the town of Gavar.

The Gavar State University was opened in 1993 after the independence of Armenia. With its five faculties the Gavar University is a major educational centre for the entire province of Gegharkunik. The University provides degrees in Philology, Natural Sciences, Humanities, Economics and Education. Nowadays, more than 2,400 students are attending the university.

The Gavar Special School is the only school for mentally and physically handicapped children in the region. It is currently carrying out steps towards improvement and development with the assistance of its partners and sponsors on its way to become a leading institution among the special schools in Armenia.

The city has a portal, which is used by many citizens abroad. The name of the portal is Kyavar as the locals pronounce the name of the city with a "ky" sound instead of a "g" sound at the beginning of the name.

Religion[edit]

Church of the Holy Mother of God built in 1905, at the centre of Gavar

The people of Gavar are mainly Christians and belong to the Armenian Apostolic Church:

  • The Church of the Holy Mother of God was built in the centre of the town by the efforts of then-bishop Khoren Muradbegian in 1905 with help of the local citizens. Until the late 1990s, it was considered the tallest church in Armenia.
  • Hayravank Monastery of the 9th century is located 7 kilometers north of Gavar on the shores of Lake Sevan.
  • The archaeological site of Noratus cemetery is located in Noratus village 4 kilometers north of Gavar. It is home to a large number of impressive medieval khachkars (cross-stones).

Cuisine[edit]

The cuisine of Gavar is closely related with the oriental cuisine elements, characterized with various spices, vegetables, fish, and fruits combination.

Kyavari Kyufta (kofta of Gavar), the town's most favourite dish, is made from minced meat spiced with onions and rolled into balls before boiling in water. Served in slices, it is garnished with butter. People of Gavar like to eat bread with almost everything, and the two traditional types of bread in Gavar are lavash and matnakash.

Kyavari Pakhlava is a many-layered pastry with tissue-thin sheets of phyllo dough, filled with nuts and sugar and finished with a dousing of hot honey.

Notable people[edit]

Here are some notable people who were born or raised in the town of Gavar:

References[edit]

External links[edit]