Gawley's Gate

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Gawley's Gate is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is situated on the south-eastern shore of Lough Neagh, seven miles to the north of Lurgan and ten miles west of Lisburn. It is notable mainly for Gawley's Gate Inn which attracts patrons from the outlying townlands. It also has a jetty and picnic area which is popular amongst many boating enthusiasts on the Lough.[1] It consists of merely half a dozen houses in close proximity; however, it is a focal point for much of the countryside on the shore of Lough Neagh from Glenavy to Lurgan. The rural location means that much of the community is involved in farming in some capacity. The landscape is quite wet with marshland and dense woods giving way to cleared hillocks or 'islands' where settlements have developed. It also a popular destination with wildfowlers and birdwatchers due to the habitat which exists particularly around the RSPB sanctuary at nearby Portmore Lough.[2]

The name "Gawley's Gate" is attributed to the family that controlled the toll gate when this section of the road was first constructed in the 17th Century. In Irish, it is known as Geata Mhic Amhlaí.

The quay and picnic area at Gawley's Gate was constructed with funding from the European Peace Programme and was opened by the First Minister David Trimble and Agriculture Minister Brid Rodgers on 7th May 2007.

There has been ongoing residential development in the area in recent years with three separate developments being constructed: Loughview, Bayview and James Lodge. In total these three developments would have about 100 houses. Until recently there was a small shop, a post office and a petrol station beside the Gate Inn. However the Post Office closed in the late 90s and the shop closed shortly afterwards.

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Coordinates: 54°32′29″N 6°19′08″W / 54.54139°N 6.31889°W / 54.54139; -6.31889