Geer v. Connecticut

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Geer v. Connecticut
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Decided March 2, 1896
Full case name Edward M. Geer v. State of Connecticut
Citations 161 U.S. 519 (more)
16 S.Ct. 600; 40 L.Ed. 793
Holding
The states owned the wild animals within their borders and could strictly regulate their management and harvest.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority White, joined by Fuller, Gray, Brown, Shiras
Dissent Field
Dissent Harlan
Brewer, Peckham took no part in the consideration or decision of the case.
Overruled by
Hughes v. Oklahoma, 441 U.S. 322 (1979)

Geer v. Connecticut, 161 U.S. 519 (1896), was a United States Supreme Court decision, which dealt with the transportation of wild fowl over state lines. Geer held that the states owned the wild animals within their borders and could strictly regulate their management and harvest. According to the Geer Court, “the right to preserve game flows from the undoubted existence in the State of a police power.” Although this statement is often quoted by state advocates, it is followed by the qualification that this power reaches only “in so far as its exercise may not be incompatible with, or restrained by, the rights conveyed to the Federal government by the Constitution.” The Geer decision supported the view that the states owned all resident wildlife, but at the time there were no conflicting federal wildlife laws.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coggins, G. C. (1980). "Wildlife and the Constitution: the walls come tumbling down". Washington Law Review 55: 295–358. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Landres, Peter; Meyer, Shannon; Matthews, Sue (2001). "The Wilderness Act and Fish Stocking: An Overview of Legislation, Judicial Interpretation, and Agency Implementation". Ecosystems 4 (4): 287–295. doi:10.1007/s10021-001-0011-6.