Genco Abbandando

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Genco Abbandando
Genco-abbandando-foto.jpg
Frank Sivero portraying Genco Abbandando
First appearance The Godfather
Created by Mario Puzo
Portrayed by Frank Sivero (young),
Franco Corsaro (old).
Information
Aliases Genco
Gender Male
Occupation Olive oil importer, consigliere
Family Corleone family
Religion Roman Catholic

Genco Abbandando is a fictional character in Mario Puzo's novel The Godfather. He is the first consigliere of the Corleone family, and childhood friend to Vito Corleone. He was portrayed by Frank Sivero in The Godfather Part II[1] and by Franco Corsaro in The Godfather film series.

In the novel[edit]

Raised in Little Italy, Genco worked at his father's grocery store from an early age. He became firm friends with the hired hand, Vito Corleone, and was upset when Vito was moved out by the neighborhood boss, Don Fanucci, even offering to steal from his father to help his friend. Vito refused, saying this would be an offense to his father.

After Vito kills Fanucci and becomes the new Don of the neighborhood, he hires Genco to act as his consigliere, and named his front company 'Genco Pura' after his friend. Genco serves him loyally, showing incredible insight, especially when Vito's son Santino asks to join the family business. Genco has his friend's hotheaded son closely assigned to his father as a bodyguard so he could learn the family business, as well as be kept under Vito's control.

Genco serves as Vito's most trusted adviser for decades, until he is stricken with cancer and can no longer fulfill his duties. During this time, Tom Hagen, Vito's unofficially adopted son, stands in for him. Genco dies with the Don at his side in 1945, the same day that Connie Corleone marries Carlo Rizzi. Vito, his sons and his godson Johnny Fontane all visit Genco to pay their respects.

Real life sources[edit]

Genco is believed to be based on John Tartamella[according to whom?], who was consigliere to Joseph Bonanno.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Godfather, Part II (1974)". nytimes.com. Retrieved 2014-07-16.