Gender in Bible translation

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Gender in Bible translation concerns various issues, such as the gender of God and generic antecedents in reference to people.

Translation of "mankind" and "humankind"[edit]

Opponents of gender neutral language argue that readers of English Bible translations who are not familiar with the original languages can be influenced by feminist assertions that generic masculine language is to be understood literally.[1][page needed] The Authorized Version of 1611 uses two gender terms, "mankind" and "womankind".[2][improper synthesis?]

Gender neutral and gender sensitive prayerbooks[edit]

  • At least one bible translation from the Hebrew and Aramaic, the Hebraic Roots Version (HRV)[3][unreliable source?] postulates that the Holy Spirit (the Ruach HaQodesh) is referred to in feminine terms, unlike the masculine terms applied to the Father and the Son.

Over the last twenty years many Jewish prayer books have been rewritten to be gender-neutral (Reform, Reconstructionist Judaism) or gender sensitive (Conservative).[improper synthesis?] Examples are shown in the following translations of Psalm 24. The following is a traditional translation excerpted from Siddur Sim Shalom, a Conservative siddur. (Ed. Jules Harlow)[full citation needed]

"A Psalm of David.
The Earth belongs to the Lord, and all it contains; the world and its inhabitants.
He founded it upon the seas, and set it firm upon flowing waters.
Who may ascend the mountain of the Lord? Who may rise in His sanctuary?
One who has a clean hand and a pure heart, who has not used God's name in false oaths, who has not sworn deceitfully.
he shall receive a blessing from the God of his deliverance."

A modern translation of Psalm 24 now appears in the revised editions of Siddur Sim Shalom.[full citation needed]

A Psalm of David.
The Earth and its grandeur belong to Adonai; the world and its inhabitants.
God founded it upon the seas, and set it firm upon flowing waters.
Who may ascend the mountain of Adonai? Who may rise in God's sanctuary?
One who has clean hands and a pure heart, who has not used God's name in false oaths, who has not sworn deceitfully.
shall receive a blessing from Adonai, a just reward from the God of deliverance."

References[edit]

  1. ^ Poythress, Vern Sheriden and Wayne A Grudem. The Gender-Neutral Bible Controversy: Muting the Masculinity of God's Words. Nashville, Tennessee: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2000.
  2. ^ Leviticus 18:22
  3. ^ [1] James Trimm Hebraic Roots Version Scriptures, (South Africa: Institute for Scripture Research, 2004, 2005), pp. lv,577,1358,1359,1464.

External links[edit]

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