Gene Hoglan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gene Hoglan
Gene Hoglan, Gods of Metal 2005, Italy.jpg
Hoglan at Gods of Metal in Italy, 2005.
Background information
Birth name Eugene Victor Hoglan II
Also known as The Atomic Clock, The Human Drum Machine
Born (1967-08-31) August 31, 1967 (age 46)
Dallas, Texas, United States
Genres Heavy metal, thrash metal, death metal, melodic death metal, black metal, industrial metal
Occupations Musician
Instruments Drums, guitar
Years active 1982–present
Associated acts

Devin Townsend, Tenet,

Dethklok, Dark Angel, Death, Testament, Strapping Young Lad, Fear Factory, Meldrum, Opeth, Unearth, Zimmers Hole, Pitch Black Forecast, Forbidden, Phantasm, Mechanism, Fall of Olympus, Old Man's Child, Viking
Website

Gene Hoglan MySpace page

Gene Hoglan Official Page

Eugene "Gene" Victor Hoglan II (born August 31, 1967 in Dallas, Texas) is an American drummer. He is acclaimed for his creativity in drum arrangements, including usage of odd devices for percussion effects and his trademark lengthy double-kick drum rhythms. His highly technical playing is extremely accurate at very high and challenging tempos, earning him the nicknames "The Atomic Clock" and "Human Drum Machine." He is best known for his work with acts Dark Angel, Death, Strapping Young Lad, Devin Townsend, Fear Factory, Opeth, Unearth, and most recently Dethklok and Testament. Hoglan recently completed work on Dethklok's third album Dethalbum III, which was released in October 2012. He has released the highly successful Gene Hoglan: The Atomic Clock DVD, and has rejoined Testament to record the drum tracks for their tenth album, entitled Dark Roots of Earth, which was released in July 2012, debuting at #12 on Billboard and #9 on the World Charts.

Hoglan was featured on the cover of Modern Drummer magazine November 2010. He also won Terrorizer magazine's Reader's Poll for Best Drummer 2010, and Modern Drummer magazine nominated Hoglan for Best Metal Drummer, and Best Recorded Performance (for Dethklok's Dethalbum II) on their 2011 ballot. He was nominated for Best Drummer in Revolver magazine's 2010 Reader's Poll.

Gene endorses Pearl Drums, Sabian cymbals, Pro-Mark sticks and Evans heads.

Biography[edit]

Hoglan got his first drum kit when he was 13 and he is completely self-taught. He started jamming along to his Kiss and Rush records,[1] with Peter Criss and Neil Peart being his early influences on his style.[2] Later Cozy Powell, Tommy Aldridge, Robb Reiner of Anvil, Rob "Wacko" Hunter of Raven and Phil "Philthy Animal" Taylor got him into the double bass drumming.[2] Other influences include Stevie Wonder, Alex Van Halen, Steve Smith, Deen Castronovo, Mark Craney, Terry Bozzio, Bill Bruford, Steve Gadd, Sonny Emory, Rick Colaluca of Watchtower, Bobby Jarzombek, Dave Culross.[3][4]

In 1983, Hoglan began his music career as a roadie (lights engineer) for the thrash metal band Slayer, where he also played the drums during concert soundchecks.[5] He did also backing vocals in the song Evil Has No Boundaries, from the first Slayer record Show No Mercy.[6] He contributed in the recording of Haunting the Chapel (1984), holding Dave Lombardo's drumkit together, while recording "Chemical Warfare", because there was not a carpet in the studio. He became an influence in Lombardo drumming style and speed, although Hoglan said he gave him a bunch of tips, never really gave him lessons[1] and the first double bass kit he ever played was Lombardo's.[1]

In 1984, he was part of the band War God with Michelle Meldrum.[5] At the end of the same year he was asked to join the thrash metal band Dark Angel as the drummer.[5] He penned most of the lyrics for Dark Angel's next three albums. He achieved greater fame during the mid-1990s playing with Death, at the same time that bandleader Chuck Schuldiner was taking that group into a more progressive style. Subsequently, he recorded one album with the thrash metal band Testament, and made the acquaintance of Canadian multi-instrumentalist Devin Townsend, forging a lasting friendship. He has since recorded several albums with Townsend, both as part of the speed/industrial/death metal band Strapping Young Lad and under Devin Townsend's name.

Hoglan was also part of thrash metal band Tenet, a side project of Strapping Young Lad guitarist Jed Simon, from 2003 to 2007. Hoglan left the band on amiable terms in January, 2007. He was replaced by Adrian Erlandsson only to return to the group in June of the same year. Hoglan recorded his drum parts for the entirety of the following album in a mere two days.[citation needed]

In 2004, for the Vancouver, British Columbia show of progressive metal band Opeth's Lamentations tour, Hoglan stood in for Martin Lopez, who was said to be having panic attacks.[7] Opeth's drum tech had filled in for the two previous dates on the tour and Lopez rejoined the band for the Seattle, Washington show.

In 2005, Hoglan stood in once again for Lopez for the majority of the Sounds of the Underground tour when Lopez began having more panic attacks.[7] Hoglan played double duty by playing a set with Strapping Young Lad then later that night performing with Opeth. It was later announced Lopez had a rare blood disorder and was seeking treatment. Hoglan also appears in Opeth's music video "The Grand Conjuration" as they filmed it on the tour while in Los Angeles, California.

Other bands have also recruited Hoglan as a session drummer. He has recorded albums with the Norwegian black metal band Old Man's Child and the Danish death metal band Daemon. Additionally he has done production and engineering work for other albums and demos. Hoglan also was recruited by the Vancouver thrash metal band, The Almighty Punchdrunk, and appeared as a band member for their only album to date, Music for Them Asses, which was released in 2001.

Hoglan is working with Dethklok, the band from the animated TV show Metalocalypse. The show was co-created by stand-up comedian/actor/musician Brendon Small, who also composes or performs all of the music. Hoglan features in Dethklok's debut album, The Dethalbum, which was released on September 25, 2007.[8] He toured during the summer of 2008 with the live band as the drummer. He later performed on Dethalbum II, the sequel album released on September 29, 2009, and has toured with Brendon Small performing as Dethklok. The two later collaborated to make Brendon Small's Galaktikon using extra studio time from the Dethklok studio sessions.

Hoglan filled in as the drummer for Unearth when their then drummer, Mike Justian, quit on tour. He has also joined the metal band Pitch Black Forecast, with former Mushroomhead singer Jason Popson, as the band's permanent drummer. Even more recently, Hoglan was announced as the drummer for the reunited Bay Area Thrash metal band Forbidden's reunion tour, replacing original Forbidden drummer Paul Bostaph.[9]

Hoglan played drums for Zimmers Hole's third studio album When You Were Shouting at the Devil...We Were in League With Satan in 2008.

In June 2011, he reunited with Testament, where he recorded their tenth studio album The Dark Roots of Earth. On that album, he filled in for Paul Bostaph, who was unable to participate in the recording sessions because of a "serious injury". In 2012, he began touring with Testament, and on January 27, he filled in for Charlie Benante for Anthrax.[10] Gene was the drummer for Fear Factory, from 2009-2012, and played on their release Mechanize. He also recently participated in the recording sessions of Viking's reunion album No Child Left Behind.[11]

In October 2013, it was announced that Hoglan is participating in the reunion of Dark Angel, who plans to tour in 2014.[12]

Discography[edit]

Gene Hoglan played drums on the songs, unless otherwise noted.

Videography[edit]

  • Dark Angel - Ultimate Revenge 2 live in 1989
  • Strapping Young Lad - For Those Aboot to Rock: Live at the Commodore (DVD, 2004, Century Media Records)[14]
  • Gene Hoglan - The Atomic Clock (DVD, 2010, Hoglan Industries)[15]
  • Behind the Player: Dimmu Borgir (DVD, 2010, Alfred Music Publishing)[16]

References[edit]

External links[edit]