Gene Kim

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Gene Kim
Gene Kim
Gene Kim
Born (1971-01-11) January 11, 1971 (age 43)
Minneaopolis, MN
Occupation Author, Researcher
Notable works The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps and Helping Your Business Win
Visible Ops Security
The Visible Ops Handbook

www.itrevolution.com

Gene Kim is an American entrepreneur, researcher, and author focused on IT operations, information security, and, DevOps.[1][2][3][4] He is best known as the founder of Tripwire, and as the author of The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win, Visible Ops Security, and The Visible Ops Handbook.[5]

Career[edit]

As a student of Dr. Gene Spafford, Kim co-authored the open source tool Tripwire while at Purdue University in 1992.[6][7][8] He co-founded Tripwire, Inc in 1997 with Wyatt Starnes [1].

In 1999, Kim started his work studying IT organizations, capturing and codifying how high performing organizations have IT operations, security, audit, management, and governance working together to solve common business objectives.[9] Kim co-wrote the “The Visible Ops Handbook: Implementing ITIL in 4 Practical and Auditable Steps” in 2004,[10] and “Visible Ops Security: Achieving Common Security and IT Operations Objectives in 4 Practical Steps” in 2008.

Kim was named as a Computer Science Outstanding Alumni in 2007 for “exceptional professional achievements and their success in advancing world technology with the application of computer science”,[11] and as one of Computerworld’s “Forty Technology Innovators Under Forty” in 2007 [2].

Career[edit]

Gene Kim is a researcher and author focused on IT operations and information security,[12][13] and more recently on DevOps.[14]

Kim was named as a Computer Science Outstanding Alumni in 2007 for “exceptional professional achievements and their success in advancing world technology with the application of computer science”,[15] and as one of Computerworld’s “Forty Technology Innovators Under Forty” in 2007.[16]

Tripwire[edit]

After Dr. Spafford and Kim co-authored Tripwire at Purdue University, Kim co-founded Tripwire, Inc in 1997 with Wyatt Starnes[17] in Portland, Oregon. He served as the CTO there for thirteen years, leaving in July 2010 to become a full-time author and researcher.[18] The company grew from 17 to 75 employees in 1999, and reached over 260 employees and $74 million in revenue by 2009.[19][20]

Author[edit]

Kim is the author of three books, The Phoenix Project, The Visible Ops Handbook and “The Visible Ops Security Handbook.”[21]

The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps and, Helping Your Business Win[edit]

Kim co-authored "The Phoenix Project" with Kevin Behr and George Spafford and published it through IT Revolution Press in January 2013.[22] It is a business book in novel format in the fashion of “The Goal,” by Dr. Eliyahu Goldratt.[23]

The novel tells the story of Bill, the IT manager at Parts Unlimited. The company’s new IT initiative, code named Phoenix Project, is critical to the future of Parts Unlimited, but the project is massively over budget and very late. The CEO wants Bill to report directly to him and fix the mess in ninety days or else Bill’s entire department will be outsourced. With the help of a prospective board member and his mysterious philosophy of The Three Ways, Bill starts to see that IT work has more in common with manufacturing plant work than he ever imagined. With the clock ticking, Bill must organize work flow streamline interdepartmental communications, and effectively serve the other business functions at Parts Unlimited.[24]

The book has been called a "must read" for IT professionals[25] and quickly reached #1 in its Amazon.com categories.[26]

The Visible Ops Handbook[edit]

The Visible Ops Handbook: Implementing ITIL in 4 Practical and Audible Steps book was co-authored by Kevin Behr and George Spafford and published by IT Revolution Press in January 2013.[27]

The book outlines how successful technology companies like Etsy, Netflix, Facebook, Amazon.com, Twitter and Google transformed their ITIL practices to implement effective change control. The Visible Ops Handbook is now considered an IT "cult classic" by the industry.[5]

The Visible Ops Security Handbook[edit]

Visible Ops Security: Achieving Common Security and IT Operations Objectives in 4 Practical Steps was published in 2008.[28] The book describes how to resolve the core conflicts businesses experience to respond more quickly to urgent business needs and provide stable, secure and predictable IT services.[29]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Change Management: The Security 'X' Factor", Podcast (Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University), November 14, 2006, retrieved December 31, 2012 
  2. ^ "Connecting the Dots Between IT Operations and Security", Podcast (Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University), May 13, 2008, retrieved December 31, 2012 
  3. ^ "Show Notes: Connecting the Dots Between IT Operations and Security", Podcast (Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University), May 13, 2008, retrieved December 31, 2012 
  4. ^ Gohring, Nancy (March 20, 2012), 'NoOps' Debate Grows Heated, PC World, retrieved December 31, 2012 
  5. ^ a b Greenemeier, Larry. "Five Questions For Gene Kim, Co-Founder And CTO Of Tripwire". Information Week. 
  6. ^ Kim, Gene H.; Spafford, Eugene H. (1993), "The Design and Implementation of Tripwire: A File System Integrity Checker", Computer Science Technical Reports (Purdue University, Department of Computer Science) (93-071), retrieved January 1, 2013 
  7. ^ Kim, Gene H.; Spafford, Eugene H. (1994), "Experiences with Tripwire: Using Integrity Checkers for Intrusion Detection", Computer Science Technical Reports (Purdue University, Department of Computer Science) (94-012), retrieved January 1, 2013 
  8. ^ Kim, Gene H.; Spafford, Eugene H. (1994), "Writing, Supporting, and Evaluating Tripwire: A Publicly Available Security Tool", Computer Science Technical Reports (Purdue University, Department of Computer Science) (94-019), retrieved January 1, 2013 
  9. ^ Bartholomew, Doug (August 28, 2006), Better Controls Yield Better Performance, Baseline Magazine (Ziff Davis), retrieved January 1, 2013 
  10. ^ "The Visible Ops Handbook". Retrieved 18 December 2012. 
  11. ^ 2007 Spring Outstanding CS Alumni, Purdue University Computer Science Alumni Relations, 2007, retrieved January 1, 2013 
  12. ^ "CERT'S Podcasts: Security for Business Leaders: Show Notes". CERT. May 13, 2008. 
  13. ^ "Change Management: The Security 'X' Factor". CERT. November 14, 2006. 
  14. ^ "'NoOps' Debate Grows Heated". PC World. March 20, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Outstanding CS Alumni Honored". Purdue University. March 28, 2007. 
  16. ^ "40 Technology Innovators and they're all under 40". Computer World. July 6, 2007. 
  17. ^ "Profile: Gene Kim". Computer World. July 9, 2007. 
  18. ^ "An Exciting Day! Leaving Tripwire to begin my next chapter". Gene Kim. July 27, 2010. 
  19. ^ Shankland, Stephen. "Security software firm Tripwire plans Linux push". CNET. 
  20. ^ Rogoway, Mike (January 19, 2010). "Tripwire reports 19 percent revenue growth". The Oregonian. Retrieved 20 January 2010. 
  21. ^ "Amazon Author Page: Gene Kim". Amazon. 
  22. ^ "Amazon.com: The Phoenix Project". Amazon. 
  23. ^ "The Phoenix Project: Make Business Security and Ops Work Together". Tripwire. January 15, 2013. 
  24. ^ "IT Revolution: The Phoenix Project". IT Revolution. 
  25. ^ "Amazon Reviews: The Phoenix Project". Amazon. 
  26. ^ "#1 in Kindle Category". Amazon. 
  27. ^ Feld, Brad. Why Every Company Needs a DevOps Team Now. Business Insider. July 8, 2013.
  28. ^ Kabay, M.E. Introducing Visible Ops Security Network World. November 18, 2008.
  29. ^ "An Introduction to Security Visible Ops With Gene Kim". TechRepublic. 

External links[edit]