Gene Taylor (bassist)

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Gene Taylor
Birth name Calvin Eugene Taylor
Born March 19, 1929 (1929-03-19)
Toledo, Ohio
Origin Detroit, Michigan, USA
Died December 22, 2001(2001-12-22) (age 72)
Sarasota, Florida, USA
Genres jazz
Occupations bassist, songwriter
Instruments double bass
Associated acts Horace Silver, Nina Simone, Judy Collins

Calvin Eugene "Gene" Taylor (March 19, 1929[1] – December 22, 2001[2]), was an American jazz double bassist. He was born in Toledo, Ohio and began his career in Detroit, Michigan.[2] Taylor worked with Horace Silver from 1958 until 1963.[1][3][4] He then joined Blue Mitchell's quintet, with whom he recorded and performed until 1965.[2] From 1966 until 1968, he toured and recorded with Nina Simone.[2] Simone recorded the song "Why? (The King of Love is Dead)", which Taylor wrote following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr..[2][5][6] Taylor began teaching music in New York public schools.[2] Taylor worked with Judy Collins from 1968 until 1976, and made numerous television appearances accompanying Simone and Collins.[2] He died on December 22, 2001, in Sarasota, Florida, where he had been living since 1990.[2]

Discography[edit]

As sideman[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Jazz Performers - T's & U's". Jazz, Ragtime & Blues in the Knight Library. Retrieved 2010-11-04. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Requiem". Allegro (New York: American Federation of Musicians, local 802) CII (3). Retrieved 2010-11-04. 
  3. ^ Obituary specifies 1962, but Taylor recorded tracks in 1963 for Song for My Father
  4. ^ Cuscuna, Michael (2008). Live at Newport '58 (CD booklet). Horace Silver. New York: Blue Note Records. 0946 3 98070 2 4. 
  5. ^ Taylor, Calvin Eugene (January 20, 1986). "Why? (The King of Love is Dead)". In Johnson, John H.. JET (Chicago: Johnson) 69 (18): 55. ISSN 0021-5996. Retrieved 2010-11-04. 
  6. ^ Simone, Nina; Stephen Cleary (2003) [1992]. I Put a Spell on You. introduction by Dave Marsh (2nd ed.). New York: Da Capo Press. pp. 114–115. ISBN 0-306-80525-1. 

External links[edit]