General Electric CJ805

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
CJ805
Convair 880 Lisa Marie Graceland Memphis TN 2013-04-01 026.jpg
A CJ805-3A turbojet installed on a Convair 880 airliner
Type Turbojet (CJ805)
Turbofan (CJ805-23)
National origin United States
Manufacturer General Electric Aircraft Engines
Major applications CJ805: Convair 880
CJ805-23: Convair 990
Developed from General Electric J79
Cutaway of a CJ805-23, the turbofan version of the engine, with fan at the rear
The turbofan CJ805-23 powered the Convair 990 airliners
RB-66A test aircraft powered by two GE CJ805-23 aft-fan engines, on the ramp at Edwards AFB
Rear view of a CJ805-3 turbojet equipped with a hush kit

The General Electric CJ805 is a jet engine which was developed by GE Aviation in the late 1950s. A simplified civilian version of the J79 featuring an axial compressor, it was developed in two versions. The basic CJ805-3 was a turbojet and powered the Convair 880, while CJ805-23 (military designation TF35), a turbofan derivative, powered the Convair 990 airliners.

Variants and applications[edit]

CJ805-3
Convair 880[1]
CJ805-3A
Convair 880-22 : Revised variable inlet guide vane and stator control.[1]
CJ805-3B
Convair 880-22M : Increased thrust.[1]
CJ805-23
Flight testing in a Douglas RB-66: Aft-fan variant with a direct drive fan attached to a free-running LP turbine.[1]
CJ805-23A
[1]
CJ805-23B
Convair 990[1]
CJ805-23C
Intended for the proposed Sud Aviation Caravelle 10A[1]

Only a single Sud Aviation Caravelle intended as a prototype for the US market, was equipped with the CJ805.

Specifications (CJ805-3B)[edit]

Data from FAA Type Certificate Data Sheet, E-306

General characteristics

  • Type: Single-spool turbojet
  • Length: 188.9 in (4,798 mm) with thrust reverser/suppressor
  • Diameter: 31.6 in (803 mm)
  • Dry weight: 3,213 lb (1,457 kg) with thrust reverser/suppressor

Components

  • Compressor: 17-stage axial flow
  • Combustors: can-annular
  • Turbine: 2× gas generator power stages + 1× free running turbine with fan blades on the periphery
  • Fuel type: Aviation kerosene
  • Oil system: pressure spray/splash

Performance

See also[edit]

Related development
Related lists

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Taylor, John W.R. FRHistS. ARAeS (1962). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1962-63. London: Sampson, Low, Marston & Co Ltd. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gunston, Bill (2006). World Encyclopedia of Aero Engines, 5th Edition. Phoenix Mill, Gloucestershire, England, UK: Sutton Publishing Limited. ISBN 0-7509-4479-X. 
  • Neumann, Gerhard (June 1984). Herman the German. William Morrow & Co. p. 269. ISBN 0-688-01682-0. The former enemy alien and Air Corps G.I. whose inventive skills and maverick management techniques made jet engine history 

External links[edit]