General Secretary of the Trades Union Congress

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The General Secretary of the TUC is the chief permanent officer of the Trades Union Congress, and a major figurehead in the trade union movement in the United Kingdom.

The Secretary is responsible for the effective operation of the TUC and for leading implementation of policies set by the annual Congress and the organisation's General Council. They also serve as the TUC's chief representative, both with the public and with other organisations.

The position was formed in 1921, when the Parliamentary Committee of the TUC became the General Council. The position of Secretary has been a permanent, full-time position in the TUC since 1904. Before that, the Secretary was elected annually at Congress.

Secretaries of the Parliamentary Committee of the TUC[edit]

General Secretaries of the TUC[edit]

  • C. W. Bowerman (10 September 1921 – 8 September 1923)
  • Fred Bramley (8 September 1923 – 10 October 1925) (died in office)
  • Sir Walter Citrine (Acting General Secretary from 10 October 1925 – 11 September 1926) (11 September 1926 – 21 October 1946)
  • Sir Vincent Tewson (21 October 1946 – 6 September 1960)
  • George Woodcock (6 September 1960 – 26 February 1969)
  • Vic Feather (Acting General Secretary from 26 February 1969 – 2 September 1969) (2 September 1969 – 7 September 1973)
  • Len Murray (7 September 1973 – 7 September 1984)
  • Norman Willis (7 September 1984 – 10 September 1993)
  • John Monks (10 September 1993 – 29 May 2003)
  • Brendan Barber (29 May 2003 – 31 December 2012)
  • Frances O'Grady (1 January 2013 – )

Deputy General Secretaries of the TUC[edit]

1977: Norman Willis
1985: Kenneth Graham
1987: John Monks
1993: Brendan Barber
2003: Frances O'Grady
2013: Position abolished[1]

Assistant General Secretaries of the TUC[edit]

1921: Fred Bramley
1924: Walter Citrine
1926: Alec Firth
1931: Vincent Tewson
1947: George Woodcock
1960: Vic Feather
1969: Len Murray
1973: Norman Willis
1978: David Lea
1999: Post vacant
2003: Kay Carberry
2013: Kay Carberry and Paul Nowak

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dan Milmo, "TUC scraps post of deputy general secretary after 'graduates only' row", The Guardian, 9 December 2012