General William J. Palmer High School

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This article is on the high school located in Colorado Springs. For the high school located in Monument, Colorado, please see Lewis-Palmer High School.

General William J. Palmer High School
William J Palmer High School Colorado Springs.jpg
A Tradition of Excellence
Location
301 North Nevada Avenue Colorado Springs, Colorado
Coordinates 38°50′20″N 104°49′12″W / 38.839°N 104.820°W / 38.839; -104.820Coordinates: 38°50′20″N 104°49′12″W / 38.839°N 104.820°W / 38.839; -104.820
Information
Type Public Secondary
Established 1874
School district Colorado Springs School District 11
Grades 9 to 12
Enrollment 2013 students
Color(s) brown and white         
Mascot eagle
Affiliation Western Association of Schools and Colleges
Information http://www.d11.org/palmer/ask_palmer.htm
Nickname Terrors
Newspaper The Lever
Yearbook Retrospect
TV Terror TV
Website

General William J. Palmer High School is a secondary school located in downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado. The school has a student population of approximately 2,000 students, and attracts enrollment from all over the city. The flagship high school of School District 11, Palmer has the oldest International Baccalaureate (IB) program in the area, founded in 1991.

History[edit]

Palmer High School is located at 301 North Nevada Avenue in Colorado Springs. It was started in the 1870s as Colorado Springs High School before it was renamed to Palmer High School. The present building was built by the Works Progress Administration under Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1940.[citation needed]

Eaglebeak

In 1945, a Native American student, Don Willis, designed Eaglebeak, a caricature of a fictitious Indian chieftain and the teams became the Terrors. In 1985 a local political hopeful criticized the mascot as racist, making Palmer one of the very first cases of controversy over a Native American mascot in the United States. Despite the fact that the politician, having lost the election, later publicly apologized to the student body and retracted the charge of racism, the damage was done and Eaglebeak was not to return. In the following years, Palmer experimented with a variety of mascots, to include a two-month flirtation with the Tasmanian devil from Warner Brothers, which nearly led to a lawsuit.[1][third-party source needed]

In the early 1990s the high school chose an eagle as its mascot, naming it "Eaglebeak", but without the historical background of the original.[1][third-party source needed]

School activities and programs[edit]

Palmer's Mock Trial program won the Colorado state competition in 2009, and won the Southern Colorado Regional Competition in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. The team has been in the state championship final round four out of the last five years.[citation needed] Palmer sent two teams to state the Colorado State Mock Trial Competition in March 2012.[2] Palmer A Team took second place and Palmer B Team took third place out of 24 teams in the tournament,[when?] and more than 100 teams in the state.Link Text[full citation needed] In 2013, Palmer sent two teams[clarification needed] to the State Tournament. Palmer's A Team took first place in the state, going on to compete at the national tournament, held in Indianapolis. The team took 14th place in the tournament.[citation needed]

Notable alumni[edit]

Notable alumni of Palmer High School include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About Palmer High School". Retrieved 26 June 2012. 
  2. ^ "Colorado High School Mock Trial". Colorado Bar Association. Retrieved 21 March 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c Brian Gomez (August 10, 2007). "Armstrong shares the importance of cycling to children at fundraiser". The Gazette. 
  4. ^ http://www.defense.gov/bios/biographydetail.aspx?biographyid=261
  5. ^ Scott Harrison (August 9, 2007). "Lance Armstrong At Broadmoor". KRDO-TV, Colorado Springs. 
  6. ^ Steve Cram (October 31, 2006). "An old champion and a local hero live in fear of New York's streets". The Guardian. 
  7. ^ "Player Bio: Reggie Jackson". Boston College Official Athletic Site. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 

External links and references[edit]