General incorporation law

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A general incorporation law allows corporations to be formed without a charter from the legislature. It also refers to a law enabling a certain type of corporation, such as a railroad, to exercise eminent domain and other special rights without a charter from the legislature.

United States[edit]

In 1795, North Carolina was the first state to pass such a law. Massachusetts came next in 1799, with New York in 1811 and Connecticut in 1837.

Railroads[edit]