General of the Army

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Navies Armies Air forces
Officers
Admiral of
the fleet
Marshal or
Field marshal
Marshal of
the air force
Admiral General Air chief marshal
Vice admiral Lieutenant general Air marshal
Rear admiral Major general Air vice-marshal
Commodore Brigadier Air commodore
Captain Colonel Group captain
Commander Lieutenant colonel Wing commander
Lieutenant
commander
Major or
Commandant
Squadron leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight lieutenant
Sub-lieutenant Lieutenant Flying officer
Ensign Second
lieutenant
Pilot officer
Midshipman Officer cadet Officer cadet
Seamen, soldiers and airmen
Warrant officer Sergeant major or
Warrant officer
Warrant officer
Petty officer Sergeant Sergeant
Leading seaman Corporal Corporal
Seaman Private Aircraftman

General of the Army (GA)[1] is a military rank used (primarily used in the United States of America) to denote a senior military leader, usually a general in command of a nation's army.[citation needed] It may also be the title given to a general who commands an army in the field.[citation needed]

The rank is typically considered[by whom?] the equivalent of marshal, field marshal, fleet admiral and other equivalent five-star ranks.[citation needed] The rank of grand general, which may also be considered a General of the Army equivalent, has appeared most often in fiction, although it is the literal translation of da jiang.[citation needed]

The rank of "General of the Army" should not be confused with the title "army general"; the rank of "General of the Army" is usually the equivalent of a five-star rank, and theoretically corresponds to overall command of an entire national army, whereas the title of "army general" is usually held by the equivalent of a four-star general, and corresponds to the command of an individual army in the field.[citation needed]

General of the Army ranks by country[edit]

The highest army rank in Liberia is "five-star" General of the Army (or field marshal). The rank is held by the Liberian President and Commander-in-Chief and was first used by Samuel Doe (1951–1990) who promoted himself from master sergeant to the rank after seizing control of the nation. The insignia of grade was worn as five stars in a row on the collar and a circle of five stars on headgear. The rank was later worn as a circle of five gold stars on the collar by President Charles Taylor (b.1948). The senior professional military rank in the Liberian army is now usually a "two-star" officer.

Equivalent General of the Army ranks[edit]

Similar General of the Army titles[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]