Generalized game

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

In computational complexity theory, a generalized game is a game that has been generalized so that it can be played on a board of any size. For example, generalized chess is the game of chess played on an n-by-n board, with 2n pieces on each side.

Complexity theory studies the asymptotic difficulty of problems, so generalizations of games are needed, as games on a fixed size of board are finite problems.

For many generalized games which last for a number of moves polynomial in the size of the board, the problem of determining if there is a win for the first player in a given position is PSPACE-complete. Generalized hex and reversi are PSPACE-complete.

For many generalized games which may last for a number of moves exponential in the size of the board, the problem of determining if there is a win for the first player in a given position is EXPTIME-complete. Generalized chess, go and checkers are EXPTIME-complete.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]