Geneva-on-the-Lake, Ohio

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Geneva-on-the-Lake, Ohio
Village
Location of Geneva-on-the-Lake, Ohio
Location of Geneva-on-the-Lake, Ohio
Coordinates: 41°51′28″N 80°56′47″W / 41.85778°N 80.94639°W / 41.85778; -80.94639
Country United States
State Ohio
County Ashtabula
Area[1]
 • Total 2.28 sq mi (5.91 km2)
 • Land 2.26 sq mi (5.85 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation[2] 600 ft (183 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 1,288
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 1,270
 • Density 569.9/sq mi (220.0/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 44041
Area code(s) 440
FIPS code 39-29652[5]
GNIS feature ID 1064710[2]
Website http://www.visitgenevaonthelake.com/

Geneva-on-the-Lake is a village in Ashtabula County, Ohio, United States. The population was 1,288 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Geneva-on-the-Lake is located at 41°51′28″N 80°56′47″W / 41.85778°N 80.94639°W / 41.85778; -80.94639 (41.857753, -80.946372).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 2.28 square miles (5.91 km2), of which, 2.26 square miles (5.85 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 1,288 people, 589 households, and 326 families residing in the village. The population density was 569.9 inhabitants per square mile (220.0/km2). There were 1,136 housing units at an average density of 502.7 per square mile (194.1/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 95.9% White, 0.2% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 0.8% from other races, and 2.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.2% of the population.

There were 589 households of which 24.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.8% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 44.7% were non-families. 34.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.80.

The median age in the village was 42.7 years. 19.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.4% were from 25 to 44; 32.7% were from 45 to 64; and 13.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 50.7% male and 49.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 1,545 people, 665 households, and 395 families residing in the village. The population density was 760.9 people per square mile (293.9/km²). There were 1,167 housing units at an average density of 574.7 per square mile (222.0/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 96.18% White, 0.58% African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 1.04% from other races, and 1.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.20% of the population. 24.5% were of German, 12.9% Irish, 10.4% English, 9.2% American and 7.8% Italian ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 665 households out of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.5% were married couples living together, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.5% were non-families. 31.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the village the population was spread out with 26.6% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 31.0% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.9 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $29,583, and the median income for a family was $31,786. Males had a median income of $28,375 versus $20,655 for females. The per capita income for the village was $15,860. About 15.0% of families and 19.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.8% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

Settlement of the original area known as The Connecticut Western Reserve started in the early 1800s, as investors, farmers, and frontiersmen from New England and the Mid Atlantic began to farm in the area and capitalize on the natural resources of Lake Erie and its shoreline.[7] Industry along the lakeshore continued to develop including a lime burning business along Cowles Creek on the west[8] and small lumber processing and ship building at Indian Creek on the east.[9] In 1869, Cullen Spencer and Edward Pratt purchased property known as Sturgeon Point (now Mapleton Beach) and opened it as a public picnic grounds with beach access.[10] In order to accommodate more visitors, residents built and established boarding houses and inns;[11] the first being what is now the Jennie Munger Gregory Museum.[12] Vacation residences continued to grow and expand through the early 1900s to include places such as the Idle-A-While and Shady Beach Inn.[13] Erieview Park was started in 1945 by E.M. "Pop" Pera[14] and grew to include nine adult and nine children's amusement park rides including The Fright Zone, one of three scary dark rides created by the Allen Herschel Co.[15] The park closed in 2006, but the Ferris wheel and carousel are still in operation nearby. Starting in 1964 with the purchase of Chestnut Grove, portions of land which were to become the Geneva-on-the-Lake State Park continued to grow through 1974 to include cabins, campgrounds, and a swimming beach.[16]

Culture[edit]

Geneva-on-the-Lake's central attraction is "the Strip", a section of State Route 531 which is lined with parks, restaurants, and arcades, and has been a tourist attraction for decades.[17] Eddie's Grill, an icon of "the Strip" has been catering to visitors since 1950 when it started as a Richardson Root Beer and hotdog stand. Through the years, it has grown into a patio, Dairy Queen, pizza parlor, and arcade serving patrons in a classic '50s-style environment.[18] In 2004, the Lodge and Conference Center at Geneva State Park, a $17 million investment opened on the lakefront allowing visitors an upscale, year-round place to stay, imbibe in wine-tasting, and view Lake Erie from an outdoor or indoor pool.[19]

One of a number of seasonal events is the "Thunder on The Strip," an annual Biker Rally held the weekend after Labor Day. Started in 2007, "Thunder on The Strip" attracts thousands of motorcyclists from around the country and brings a boost to local business.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ Koile, Wendy (2012). Geneva on the Lake: A History of Ohio's First Summer Resort. Charleston, SC: The History Press. pp. 15–17. ISBN 978-1-60949-487-2. 
  8. ^ Koile, Wendy (2012). Geneva on the Lake: A History of Ohio's First Summer Resort. Charleston, SC: The History Press. p. 19. ISBN 978-1-60949-487-2. 
  9. ^ Koile, Wendy (2012). Geneva on the Lake: A History of Ohio's First Summer Resort. Charleston, SC: The History Press. p. 23. ISBN 978-1-60949-487-2. 
  10. ^ Koile, Wendy (2012). Geneva on the Lake: A History of Ohio's First Summer Resort. Charleston, SC: The History Press. p. 29. ISBN 978-1-60949-487-2. 
  11. ^ Koile, Wendy (2012). Geneva on the Lake: A History of Ohio's First Summer Resort. Charleston, SC: The History Press. pp. 29–30. ISBN 978-1-60949-487-2. 
  12. ^ Koile, Wendy (2012). Geneva on the Lake: A History of Ohio's First Summer Resort. Charleston, SC: The History Press. p. 27. ISBN 978-1-60949-487-2. 
  13. ^ Koile, Wendy (2012). Geneva on the Lake: A History of Ohio's First Summer Resort. Charleston, SC: The History Press. pp. 35–37. ISBN 978-1-60949-487-2. 
  14. ^ "Geneva-on-the-lake erieview park is closing". The Younstown Vindicator. September 8, 2006. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  15. ^ Trax Page, Margie (October 8, 2006). "Scary times over in GOTL, but...". The Star Beacon. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  16. ^ "Geneva-on-the-Lake State Park". www.stateparks.com. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  17. ^ "Ohio's First Summer Resort". Geneva-on-the-Lake official website. Retrieved 2008-08-13. 
  18. ^ Koile, Wendy (2012). Geneva on the Lake: A History of Ohio's First Summer Resort. Charleston, SC: The History Press. pp. 87–90. ISBN 978-1-60949-487-2. 
  19. ^ Sheehan, Thomas (October 31, 2004). "Resort Sheds Rough Biker Reputation". Lakeland Ledger. Retrieved 2 October 2013. 
  20. ^ Dillaway, Warren (09/07/2013). "Thunder on the Strip is in full swing at Geneva-on-the-Lake". Star Beacon. Retrieved 17 April 2014.  Check date values in: |date= (help)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°51′28″N 80°56′47″W / 41.857753°N 80.946372°W / 41.857753; -80.946372