Geneviève Petau de Maulette

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Madame Geneviève Pétau de Maulette, Lady Glenluce (c. 1563–1643) was a French noblewoman, tutor to Elizabeth of Bohemia, author and the second wife of John Gordon, D.D., Dean of Salisbury and Lord Glenluce and Longormes.

Biography[edit]

Pétau was born in Brittany, France. Her parentage is not known for sure, but she was probably the daughter of François Pétau, seigneur de Maulette.[1][2]

Pétau was raised a Protestant, and in 1594 she married Dr. John Gordon, a prominent Scottish reverend who was Gentleman of the Bedchamber to the French king.[1]

Family tradition holds that Lady Glenluce served as the French instructor to the eldest daughter of King James I and Queen Anne of Denmark, Princess Elizabeth.[1]

lady Geneviève died on 6 December 1643 at Gourdonstoun [sic], Moray, and was buried at the Michael Kirk in the old churchyard of Oggston in the parish of Drainie, Moray.[1]

Works[edit]

Lady Geneviève is remembered for her work in French entitled, Devoreux, Vertues Teares for the Losse of King Henry III of Fraunce, by a learned gentlewoman, Madame Geneviève Petau. The poem praises Henry III of France and an English nobleman, Walter Devereux.[3] The work was written some time after the end of the siege of Rouen in late 1591 and before it was translated into English in 1597 by Gervase Markham.[4][5]

Family[edit]

Lady Geneviève and her husband had one child, Lucie or Louise (1597–1680), who married Sir Robert Gordon, 1st Baronet of Gordonstoun,[1] fourth son of 12th Earl of Sutherland;[6] they had a daughter Katherine, who was mother of the Quaker Robert Barclay.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Mullan 2008, Gordon, John.
  2. ^ But she may have been the daughter of Gideon Pétau, sieur de Maule and "first president" of the Parlement of Brittany (Mullan 2008, Gordon, John).
  3. ^ Cox 2004, p. [page needed].
  4. ^ Prescott 2008, Mary Sidney's Antonius ....
  5. ^ Cox 2004, p. [page needed].
  6. ^ Stevenson, David. "Gordon, Sir Robert, of Gordonstoun". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/11075.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

References[edit]