Bible translations into Slavic languages

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The history of all Bible translations into Slavic languages begins with Bible translations into Church Slavonic. Other languages include:

East Slavic[edit]

Old Belarusian[edit]

Bible, published by Francysk Skaryna

An effort to produce a version in the vernacular was made by Francysk Skaryna (d. after 1535), a native of Polatsk in Belarus. He published at Prague, 1517–19, twenty-two Old Testament books in Old Belarusian language, in the preparation of which he was greatly influenced by the Bohemian Bible of 1506. Other efforts were made during the 16th and 17th centuries, but the Church Slavonic predominated in all these efforts.

For further reference go to http://www.pravapis.org/art_skaryna1.asp

Russian[edit]

Further information: Russian Synodal Bible
See also: Archangel Gospel, Russian. And The Four Gospels ("Четвероевангелие" ("Chetveroevangelie")) Tetraevangelia of Ivan Alexander by Pyotr Mstislavets (1574-1575)

Ukrainian[edit]

The known history of the Bible translation into Ukrainian began in the 16th century with Peresopnytsia Gospels, which included only four Gospels of the New Testament.

South Slavic[edit]

Bulgarian[edit]

The Bulgarian Orthodox church continued to use the Old Church Slavonic until the 1940s. In 1835 the British and Foreign Bible Society contracted a Bulgarian monk, Neofit Rilski, who started on a new translation which, in later editions, remains the standard version today.

Macedonian[edit]

Early history of Macedonian translations are closely linked with translations into Bulgarian dialects from 1852. The whole Bible (including the Deuterocanonical books) translated in Macedonian by the Archbishop Gavril was printed in 1990.

Serbian[edit]

Croatian[edit]

Slovene[edit]

In the 16th century Slovene Prostestant Pastors Primož Trubar and Jurij Dalmatin translete the Bible. Dalmatin's work the full Old and New Testament.

Prekmurian[edit]

István Küzmics and Miklós Küzmics in Prekmurian Slovene (Nouvi Zákon, Szvéti evangyeliomi) translete the Bible. Our works also unique in the European literature.

West Slavic[edit]

Polish[edit]

Bible translations into Polish date to the 13th century. First full translations were completed in the 16th century. Today the official and most popular Bible in Poland is the Millennium Bible (Biblia Tysiąclecia) first published in 1965.

Kashubian[edit]

The known history of the Bible translation into Kashubian began in the 16th century with Szimón Krofey. Four Gospels of the New Testament has been translated into Kashubian by Rev. Franciszek Grucza - Frãcëszk Grëcza: Kaszëbskô Biblëjô; Nowi Testament; IV Ewanjelje, Poznań 1992. Important are “Ewanielie na kaszëbsczi tłomaczoné" (2010) by Fr. Adam R. Sikora [1].

Czech[edit]

The first translation of the book of psalms was done before 1300. The first translation of the whole Bible into Czech, based on the Latin Vulgate, was done around 1360. The first printed Bible was published in 1488 (the Prague Bible). The first translation from the original languages (Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek) was the Kralice Bible from 1579, the definitive edition published in 1613. The Bible of Kralice was and remains in wide use. Among modern translations the Ecumenical Version of 1979 is commonly used. The newest translation in modern Czech was completed in 2009.

Slovak[edit]

Sorbian (Wendish)[edit]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]