Geoffrey Beattie

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Geoff Beattie [1] is an academic psychologist, writer and broadcaster. He is Professor of Psychology at Edge Hill University and a Masters supervisor on the Sustainability Leadership Programme at the University of Cambridge. He was Professor of Psychology at the University of Manchester from 1994 until 2012, Head of the Department of Psychology from 2000 to 2004 and Head of the School of Psychological Sciences from 2004 to 2011. He was also a Professorial Research Fellow in the Sustainable Consumption Institute (SCI) at the University from 2008 to 2012 and Visiting Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2012. [2]

He is best known for his detailed analyses of nonverbal communication which has featured in a large number of academic articles and books including ‘Talk: An Analysis of Speech and Non-Verbal Behaviour in Conversation ’ (Open University Press),[1] ‘The Psychology of Language and Communication’ (Psychology Press),[2] and ‘Visible Thought: The New Psychology of Body Language’ (Routledge).[3] He has shown that some nonverbal communication, particularly the movements of the hands whilst talking, reflects unarticulated aspects of thinking and therefore we can potentially ‘read’ hidden thoughts by paying close attention to these movements

He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and was awarded the Spearman Medal by the BPS for 'published psychological research of outstanding merit'.[4] He was also President of the Psychology section of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in 2005 to 2006. In 2010 with a number of colleagues he was awarded the internationally acclaimed Mouton d’Or [5] for the best paper in the leading semiotics journal Semiotica [6] for research on the effects of deception on gesture production.[7]

He is also well known for bringing analyses of behaviour, and particularly nonverbal communication, to a more general audience by appearing as the on-screen psychologist on eleven series of Big Brother[8] in the U.K. and for explaining how psychology can be used by people in their everyday lives, for example, in Get the Edge: How Simple Changes Will Transform Your Life (Headline).[9] Translations of this book have now appeared in China, Taiwan and Brazil and his work in psychology has also been extensively covered in the national and international media including ABC News, Russia Today, Good Morning America, BBC Breakfast, Channel 4 News, The Wall Street Journal, The Telegraph and The Mirror amongst many others.


From the start of his academic career he was interested in exploring psychological issues outside the ivory tower of the university and he wrote extensively about life in the North of England during a previous recession mainly for The Guardian newspaper. He focussed on the lives of unemployed steel workers and miners, the sometimes desperate new entrepreneurs, boxers, doormen, clubbers, ten bob ‘millionaires’ who were really on the dole, masseuses and burglars, those trying to get by day by day in desperate economic times. He was interested in how people survived psychologically when they were thrown onto the scrapheap by a government who did not seem particularly interested in their fate. The Sunday Times described him as ‘a gifted journalist with a genius for making people talk.’ City Life described him as ‘an impressive and eloquent chronicler of the buried underside of British life.’ The Manchester Evening News said that he was ‘slowly establishing himself as one of the most perceptive writers in the country’.

This work resulted in a number of books including ‘Survivors of Steel City’ (Chatto & Windus),[10] ‘Making It: The Reality of Today’s Entrepreneurs’ (Weidenfeld & Nicolson),[11] ‘England After Dark’ (Weidenfeld & Nicolson),[12]‘Hard Lines: Voices from Deep within a Recession’ (Mandolin) [13] and ‘On the Ropes: Boxing as a Way of Life’ (Victor Gollancz).[14] ‘On the Ropes’ was shortlisted for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year in 1996.[15] He was also story consultant on an award winning ninety-minute documentary film about Sheffield, entitled 'Tales from a Hard City'.[16] This documentary film won the Grand Prix at the Marseilles Film Festival and the Best Regional Film in the Indies Awards.[17]

Early life and education[edit]


He was born in Ligoniel in North Belfast. His father Billy was a motor mechanic, his mother Eileen worked in the local mill. After leaving Belfast Royal Academy, he studied psychology at the University of Birmingham graduating with a First Class Honours degree and then did his PhD at Trinity College, Cambridge. The research focus for his Ph.D. was the relationship between thinking and language, but he became particularly interested in nonverbal communication and its connection with language and thought, an interest that has continued to the present. His first academic job was at the University of Sheffield where he was appointed lecturer in social psychology.

North Belfast was an area particularly affected by the Troubles (and often called ‘Murder Triangle’ by the media) and he wrote about his Protestant working-class background in a number of books ‘We Are the People: Journeys through the Heart of Protestant Ulster’ (Heinemann),[18] ‘Protestant Boy’ (Granta) [19] and a novel ‘The Corner Boys’ (Victor Gollancz).[20] ‘We are The People’ and ‘The Corner Boys’ were both shortlisted for the Ewart-Biggs Literary Prize in 1993 and 1999 respectively.[21] He also wrote about Northern Ireland and the Troubles for various newspapers and magazines including The Guardian, The Independent and The New Statesman.[22]

He made a documentary for BBC1 Northern Ireland entitled From the Turn-of-the-Road charting the return to his roots in North Belfast for the documentary series Home Truths.[23] He also wrote and presented ‘The Ceasefire Generation’ a documentary about eighteen year-olds in Northern Ireland, born after the 1994 ceasefire, broadcast on Radio 4, in September 2012. The Ceasefire Generation, BBC1 Northern Ireland

He has always been a keen sportsman and interested in the psychology behind sport. This resulted in two series for Radio 5 Live and a book ‘Head to Head: Uncovering the Psychology of Sporting Success’ (Victor Gollancz) analyzing the psychology underlying sporting success in interviews with Alex Ferguson, Kelly Holmes, Naseem Hamed, Jonathan Edwards, Chris Boardman and others.[24]

He also explored the lives of boxers in and out of the ring in two books based around Brendan Ingle’s gym in Sheffield ‘On the Ropes: Boxing as a Way of Life’ (Victor Gollancz) [25] and ‘The Shadows of Boxing. Prince Naseem and Those He Left Behind’ (Orion).[26] He took up boxing to write ‘On the Ropes’, as other more illustrious writers have done in the past. Indeed the first ‘word’ in ‘On the Ropes’ is the noise he made involuntarily when he was punched in the stomach by Mick ‘the Bomb’ Mills.

He has trained daily since he was thirteen (the year his father died). His son Ben could never understand why he had to run with his father as a child. Ben himself is now a dedicated and very successful runner (bordering on elite status) and he understands his father a little better. They explored their relationship and their compulsion to run in ‘Chasing Lost Times: A Father and Son Reconciled Through Running’ (Mainstream).[27]

Other academic interests[edit]


The psychology of sustainable consumption
Since 2007 another main area of academic interest has been the psychology of sustainability and he has been investigating why people are not doing more to safeguard the environment in the light of the threat posed by climate change. The most important thing which emerged from this research was that although people say that they have very positive attitudes towards the environment, measures of implicit attitudes, which are largely unconscious, are not nearly so positive but are better predictors of actual behaviour in many situations (see, for example, ‘Why Aren’t We Saving the Planet? A Psychologist’s Perspective’, Routledge).[28] People seem to be ‘dissociated’ when it comes to the environment and understanding this state could be crucial to changing their behaviour.

A major part of this research has involved the development and refinement of various implicit measures of attitude including the Implicit Association Test (IAT) [29] to measure unconscious attitudes to things like carbon footprint, and eye tracking techniques to measure individual fixation points 25 times per second when consumers look at products, in order to measure core values. This research was funded by Tesco through the Sustainable Consumption Institute at the University of Manchester. One resulting paper 'Explicit and Implicit Attitudes to Low and High Carbon Footprint Products' was shortlisted for the International Award for Excellence by The International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability.[30]

The psychology of unconscious racial prejudice
The interest in sustainability also meant that he became interested in possible ‘dissociation’ in other areas of life and he explored this in the area of unconscious racial prejudice especially in the context of shortlisting for academic posts. Beattie showed that when White people were shortlisting candidates for jobs, they were ten times more likely to select two White candidates than two non-White candidates (despite the White and non-White candidates having identical CVs) and, in addition, using remote eye tracking to monitor their individual gaze fixation points, he found that those doing the shortlisting unconsciously fixated on the weaker parts of the CV of candidates from different racial backgrounds to themselves. One consequence of this selective attention, directed by the unconscious system, is that the final outcome might appear quite reasonable and might well satisfy our conscious and rational self. Beattie has argued that if we really do want to do anything about racism in society, then we need to understand these implicit, unconscious processes and how to combat them. The research is reported in ‘Our Racist Heart? An Exploration of Unconscious Prejudice in Everyday Life’ (Routledge, 2012)[31] and was funded by Equality and Diversity at the University of Manchester [32] and then by the U.K.’s Equality Challenge Unit.[33]

Media[edit]

Television[edit]

Resident on-screen psychologist [Big Brother] ([Channel 4]) 2000-2010 focussing mainly on nonverbal communication and patterns of social interaction Big Brother 2007

Co-presenter, Life’s Too Short (BBC1) This series applied psychological insights (including detailed behavioural analyses) to a range of people having trouble in their relationships. BBC1: Life's Too Short episode guide

Presenter, Family SOS (BBC1 Northern Ireland) A detailed look at families currently experiencing a wide range of important but unidentified psychological issues. The analytic focus was again on the behaviour of the family members and how they interacted with each other. The goal was to work out what specifically needed to change to improve the situation. BBC Northern Ireland

Presenter, Dump Your Mates in Four Days (Channel 4) A series aimed at teenagers which allowed teenagers to ‘try out’ different sets of friends in order to teach them something about themselves and their social networks and how things can change. Dump Your Mates in Four Days (Channel 4)

Co-presenter and psychologist, The Farm of Fussy Eaters (UKTV Style) A series focusing on individuals with oddly constrained and unhealthy food choices. His role was to understand where the various attitudes to food came from and how they could be modified. UKTV The Farm of Fussy Eaters

On-screen psychologist, Ghosthunting with.... (ITV2 and ITV1) On-screen psychologist, focusing on the nonverbal behaviour of celebrities in various ‘haunted’ locations. The celebrities have included Girls Aloud, Coronation Street, Emmerdale, McFly, The Happy Mondays, Paul O’Grady and friends, Boyzone, The Saturdays, Katie Price and friends, TOWIE etc. Ghosthunting With....The Saturdays

He has also been a frequent guest on the ITV News (with a slot called ‘The Body Politic’ at one General Election[34] ), Lorraine Kelly, Richard and Judy, The One Show, Tonight with Trevor McDonald (ITV), with other guest appearances on Child of Our Time, Arena, It’s Only a Theory,[35] Risky Business, Tomorrow’s World, The Heart of the Matter, Watchdog, BBC Breakfast,[36] Good Morning America, the Keri-Anne Show (Australia),[37] TV4 (Sweden), News Asia, The Mindfield, and various documentaries for Channel 4, Channel 5, BBC4 and Sky.

Radio[edit]

Numerous radio interviews (including Woman’s Hour Radio 4 [38] and Nightwaves Radio 3[39] ) on such topics as the NHS Choice Campaign, mothers combining child rearing and entrepreneurship, mood and feel good films, flashbulb memories for personal and historical events, and the analysis of fake and genuine smiles. Other radio interviews include 'Science Now' (Radio 4), The Today Programme (Radio 4), All in the Mind (Radio 4), Word of Mouth (Radio 4), Midweek (Radio 4), Parkinson on Sunday (Radio 2), BBC World Service 'World of Books' programme, 'This Week' (RTÉ), The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Freewheeling (Radio 4) and many local radio stations.

Journalism[edit]

He has written extensively for The Guardian,[40] The Observer,[41] The Observer Magazine,[42] The Independent [43] and The Independent on Sunday.[44]

Books[edit]

  • Beattie, G. (2013) Our Racist Heart? An Exploration of Unconscious Prejudice in Everyday Life. London: Routledge[45]
  • Beattie, G and Beattie, B. (2012) Chasing Lost Times. A Father and Son Reconciled Through Running. London: Mainstream Publishing[46]
  • Beattie, G. (2011). Get The Edge: How Simple Changes Will Transform Your Life. London: Headline Book Publishing.[47]
  • Beattie, G. (2010). Why Aren't We Saving The Planet? A Psychologist's Perspective. UK: Routledge: London.[48]
  • Beattie, G. (2004). Protestant Boy. Granta: London.[49]
  • Beattie, G. (2003). Visible Thought: The New Psychology of Body Language. Routledge: London.[50]
  • Beattie, G. (2002). The Shadows of Boxing: Prince Naseem and those he left behind. Orion: London.[51]
  • Beattie, G. (2000). The Corner Boys. Klett-Cotta: Berlin.[52]
  • Beattie, G. (1999). Belfastin Pojat. Otava: Helsinki.[53]
  • Beattie, G. (1998). Head-to-Head: Uncovering the Psychology of Sporting Success. Victor Gollancz: London.[54]
  • Beattie, G. (1998). Hard Lines: Voices from Deep within a Recession. Mandolin: Manchester.[55]
  • Beattie, G. (1998). The Corner Boys. Victor Gollancz: London. Published in paperback, Indigo: London (1999).[56]
  • Beattie, G. (1996). On the Ropes: Boxing as a Way of Life. Victor Gollancz: London. Published in paperback, Indigo: London (1997).[57]
  • Beattie, G. (1992). We Are the People. Journeys Through the Heart of Protestant Ulster. Heinemann: London. (pp. 246).[58]
  • Beattie, G. (1990). England After Dark. Weidenfeld & Nicolson:London.[59]
  • Beattie, G. (1989). All Talk: Why it's important to watch your words and everything else you say. Weidenfeld & Nicolson: London.[60]
  • Beattie, G. (1988). Beachwatching. Rambletree Press: Hove.[61]
  • Beattie, G. (1987). Making It: The Reality of Today's Entrepreneurs. Weidenfeld & Nicolson: London.[62]
  • Beattie, G. (1986). Survivors of Steel City. Chatto & Windus: London.[63]
  • Ellis, A. & Beattie, G. (1986). The Psychology of Language and Communication. Psychology Press: London.[64]
  • Beattie, G. (1983) Talk: An Analysis of Speech and Non-Verbal Behaviour in Conversation. Open University Press: Milton Keynes.[65]

Selected Publications (from 2005)[edit]

Nonverbal Communication[edit]

  • Beattie, G., Webster, K. A., & Ross, J. A. D. (2014). Do speakers really unconsciously and imagistically gesture about what is important when they are telling a story? Semiotica, 202, 41-79. [3]
  • Beattie, G. & Shovelton, H. (2011). An exploration of the other side of semantic communication: How the spontaneous movements of the human hand add crucial meaning to narrative. Semiotica., 184, 33-51. [4]
  • Cohen, D., Beattie, G. & Shovelton, H. (2011). Tracking the distribution of individual semantic features in gesture across spoken discourse: New perspectives in multi-modal interaction. Semiotica, 185, 147-188. [5]
  • Beattie, G., Webster, K. & Ross, J. (2010). The fixation and processing of the iconic gestures that accompany talk. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 20, 1-20. Further details
  • Cohen, D., Beattie, G. & Shovelton, H. (2010). Nonverbal indicators of deception: How iconic gestures reveal thoughts that cannot be suppressed. Semiotica, 182, 133-174.[66]
  • Holler, J., Shovelton, H. & Beattie, G. (2009). Do iconic hand gestures really contribute to the communication of semantic information in a face-to-face context? Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 33, 73-88.Access article
  • Beattie, G. & Shovelton, H. (2006). When size really matters: How a single semantic feature is represented in the speech and gesture modalities. Gesture, 6, 63-84. Further information
  • Beattie, G. & Shovelton, H. (2005). Why the spontaneous images created by the hands during talk can help make TV advertisements more effective. British Journal of Psychology, 96, 21-37. [6]

Sustainability[edit]

  • Beattie, G & McGuire, L. (2013). The psychology of consumption: or why we don’t do what we say. In Ulph, A. and Southerton, D. Sustainable Consumption: Multidisciplinary Perspectives. Oxford University Press: London. [7]
  • Beattie, G. (2012) How effective is carbon labelling for the consumer? Nature Climate Change, 2, 214-217.[67]
  • Beattie, G. & McGuire, L. (2012). See no evil? Only implicit attitudes predict unconscious eye movements towards images of climate change. Semiotica.[68]
  • Beattie, G. (2011) Making an action film. Do films such as Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth really make any difference to how we think and feel about climate change? Nature Climate Change, 1, 372-374.[69]
  • Beattie, G. & Sale, L. (2011). Shopping to save the planet? Implicit rather than explicit attitudes predict low carbon footprint consumer choice. The International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 7, 211-232.
  • Beattie, G. & McGuire, L. (2011). Are we too optimistic to bother saving the planet? The relationship between optimism, eye gaze and negative images of climate change. The International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 7, 241-256. Further details
  • Beattie, G., Sale, L., & McGuire, L. (2011). An Inconvenient Truth? Can extracts of film really affect our psychological mood and our motivation to act against climate change? Semiotica, 187, 105-126.[70]
  • Beattie, G. McGuire, L. & Sale, L. (2010). Do we actually look at the carbon footprint of a product in the initial few seconds? An experimental analysis of unconscious eye movements. The International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 6, 47-66.
  • Beattie, G. & Sale, L. (2009). Explicit and implicit attitudes to low and high carbon footprint products. The International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 5, 191-206. Further details

Implicit Racial Bias[edit]

  • Beattie, G. (2013). Our Racist Heart? An Exploration of Unconscious Prejudice in Everyday Life. Routledge: London. [8]
  • Beattie, G., Cohen, D.L. & McGuire, L. (2013). An exploration of possible unconscious ethnic biases in higher education: The role of implicit attitudes on selection for university posts. Semiotica, 197, 217-247. [9]
  • Beattie, G. & Johnson P. (2011). Unconscious Bias in Recruitment and Promotion and the Need to Promote Equality. Perspectives: Policy and Practice in Higher Education, 16, 7-13.[10]

Beattie was Professor of Psychology at the University of Manchester from 1994 until 2012 but was dismissed for alleged breach of contract concerning failure to gain the necessary approvals for his media work. Beattie sued the University for unfair and wrongful dismissal and won his case on both counts in August 2014 [11]. The university had encouraged this media work from the start and used it extensively in their own promotional material both in the UK and overseas. http://www.yourmanchester.manchester.ac.uk/netcommunity/document.doc?id=2 Beattie gave the Star Lecture at the University of Manchester in 2011, his extensive media work was used to publicise the talk. http://www.umass.manchester.ac.uk/umass_files/geoff_beattie.pdf

References[edit]

  1. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1983). Talk. An Analysis of Speech and Non-Verbal Behaviour in Conversation. Milton Keynes: Open University Press. ISBN 0335104142. 
  2. ^ Ellis, Andrew; Geoffrey Beattie (1986). The Psychology of Language And Communication. London: Psychology Press. ISBN 978-0863770517. 
  3. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2004). Visible Thought. The New Psychology of Body Language. London: Routledge. ISBN 9780415308106. 
  4. ^ Beattie, Geoff. "Spearman Medal". BPS. 
  5. ^ "Mouton d'Or Award". Retrieved 2 April 2013. 
  6. ^ Semiotica. "Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies". De Gruyter. Retrieved 9 April 2013. 
  7. ^ Cohen, Doron; Geoffrey Beattie and Heather Shovelton (November 2010). "Nonverbal indicators of deception: How iconic gestures reveal thoughts that cannot be suppressed". Semiotica 2010 (182): 133–174. doi:10.1515/semi.2010.055. 
  8. ^ Beattie, Geoff. "Big Brother". Channel 4. 
  9. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2011). Get the Edge. How Simple Changes Will Transform Your Life. London: Headline. ISBN 9780755360376. 
  10. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey (1986). Survivors of Steel City. A Portrait of Sheffield. London: Chatto & Windus. ISBN 0701130318. 
  11. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey (1987). Making It. The Reality of Today's Entrepreneurs. London: Weidenfeld and Nocolson. ISBN 0297792296. 
  12. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1990). England After Dark. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. ISBN 0297811371. 
  13. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey (1998). Hard Lines. Voices From Deep Within a Recession. Manchester: Mandolin. ISBN 9781901341089. 
  14. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey (1997). On The Ropes. Boxing as a Way of Life. London: Indigo. ISBN 0575400765. 
  15. ^ "William Hill 1996 shortlisted books". William Hill. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  16. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey. "Tales From a Hard City". Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  17. ^ "Tales From a Hard City awards". Picture Palace. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  18. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey (1992). We Are the People: Journeys through the Heart of Protestant Ulster. London: Heinemann. ISBN 0434049646. 
  19. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey (2004). Protestant Boy. London: Granta. ISBN 1862077568. 
  20. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey (1998). The Corner Boys. London: Victor Gollancz. ISBN 057540194X. 
  21. ^ Beattie, Geoff. "United Agents Profile". United Agents. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  22. ^ Beattie, Geoff. "In cold, driving rain, a brief burst of sunshine". The New Statesman. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  23. ^ Beattie, Geoff. "From The Turn-of-the-Road". Callister tv. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  24. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1998). Head to Head. Uncovering the Psychology of Sporting Success. London: Victor Gollancz. ISBN 0575063580. 
  25. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1996). On The Ropes. Boxing as a Way of Life. London: Victor Gollancz. ISBN 0575400765. 
  26. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2002). The Shadows of Boxing. Prince Naseem & Those He Left Behind. London: Orion. ISBN 0752849794. 
  27. ^ Beattie, Geoff; Ben Beattie (2012). Chasing Lost Times. A Father and Son Reconciled Through Running. Edinburgh: Mainstream Publishing. ISBN 9781780575209. 
  28. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2010). Why Aren't We Saving the Planet? A Psychologist's Perspective. London: Routledge. ISBN 9780415561976. 
  29. ^ Implicit Association Test. "Project Implicit". Harvard. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  30. ^ Beattie, Geoff; Laura Sale. "Explicit and Implicit Attitudes to Low and High Carbon Footprint Products". Common Ground Publisher. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  31. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2013). Our Racist Heart? An Exploration of Unconscious Prejudice in Everyday Life. London: Routledge. ISBN 9780415612999. 
  32. ^ Equality and Diversity. "Equality and Diversity". University of Manchester. 
  33. ^ Equality Challenge Unit. "ECU". Equality Challenge Unit. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  34. ^ Times Higher Education. "Read their lips and fingertips". Times Higher Education. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  35. ^ Beattie, Geoff. "It's Only a Theory". BBC 4. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  36. ^ BBC Breakfast. "Tackling the 'Monday blues'". BBC. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  37. ^ Beattie, Geoff. "Kerri-Anne Show". Channel 9. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  38. ^ Geoff, Beattie. "Woman's Hour". BBC Radio 4. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  39. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey. "Night Waves". BBC Radio 3. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  40. ^ Beattie, Geoff (19 February 2010). "Tiger Woods' body language". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  41. ^ Beattie, Geoff (26 June 2005). "Why Big Brother Keeps us Hooked". London: The Observer. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  42. ^ Beat
    tie, Geoff (15 January 2006). "On the couch with Tracey Emin". London: The Observer. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
     
  43. ^ Beattie, Geoff (5 September 2010). "Inside the mind of Tony Blair". London: The Independent. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  44. ^ Beattie, Geoff (19 June 2011). "Why Greeks Make a Drama out of a Crisi". London: The Independent. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  45. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey (2013). Our Racist Heart? An Exploration of Unconscious Prejudice in Everyday Life?. London: Routledge. ISBN 978-0415612999. 
  46. ^ Beattie, Geoffrey; Ben Beattie (2012). Chasing Lost Times. A Father and Son Reconciled Through Running. London: Mainstream. ISBN 9781780575209. 
  47. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2011). Get the Edge. How Simple Changes Will Transform Your Life. London: Headline. ISBN 9780 7553 6037 6. 
  48. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2010). Why Aren't We Saving The Planet? A Psychologists Perspective. London: Routledge. ISBN 978-0415561976. 
  49. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2004). Protestant Boy. London: Granta. ISBN 1-86207-756-8. 
  50. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2004). Visible Thought: The New Psychology of Body Language. London: Routledge. ISBN 0415308100. 
  51. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2002). The Shadows of Boxing. Prince Naseem and Those He Left Behind. London: Orion. ISBN 0-75284-979-4. 
  52. ^ Beattie, Geoff (2000). Corner Boys. Berlin: Klett-Cotta. ISBN 3-608-93464-2. 
  53. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1999). The Corner Boys. Helsinki: Otova. ISBN 951-1-15815-5. 
  54. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1998). Head to Head. Uncovering the Psychology of Sporting Success. Great Britain: Victor Gollancz. ISBN 0 575 06358 0. 
  55. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1998). Hard Lines. Voices From Deep Within A Reecession. Manchester: Mandolin. ISBN 1 901341 08 9. 
  56. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1998). The Corner Boys. Great Britain: Indigo. ISBN 0-575-40194-X. 
  57. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1996). On the Ropes. Boxing as a Way of Life. London: Indigo. ISBN 0 575 40076 5. 
  58. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1992). We Are the People. Journeys Through the Heart of Protestant Ulster. London: Heinemann. ISBN 0 434 04964 6. 
  59. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1990). England After Dark. London: George Weidenfeld and Nicolson Limited. ISBN 0 297 81137 1. 
  60. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1988). All Talk. Why It's Important to Watch Your Words and Everything Else You Say. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. ISBN 0-297-79495-7. 
  61. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1988). The Canderel Guide to Beach Watching. Hove: Rambletree. ISBN 0 947894 05 5. 
  62. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1987). Making It. The Reality of Today's Entrepreneurs. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. ISBN 0 297 79257 1. 
  63. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1986). Survivors of Steel City. London: Chatto and Windus. ISBN 0-7011-3031-8. 
  64. ^ Ellis, Andrew; Geoff Beattie (1986). The Psychology of Language And Communication. London: Psychology Press. ISBN 978-0863770517. 
  65. ^ Beattie, Geoff (1983). Talk: Analysis of Speech and Non-verbal Behaviour in Conversation. Milton Keynes: Open University Press. ISBN 978-0335104147. 
  66. ^ Cohen, Doron; Geoffrey Beattie and Heather Shovelton (2010). "Nonverbal indicators of deception: How iconic gestures reveal thoughts that cannot be suppressed". Semiotica 2010 (182): 133–174. doi:10.1515/semi.2010.055. 
  67. ^ Beattie, Geoff (March 2012). "Psychological effectiveness of carbon labelling". Nature Climate Change 2: 214–217. doi:10.1038/nclimate1468. 
  68. ^ Beattie, Geoff; Laura McGuire (October 2012). "See no evil? Only implicit attitudes predict unconscious eye movements towards images of climate change". Semiotica 2012 (192): 315–339. doi:10.1515/sem-2012-0066. 
  69. ^ Beattie, Geoff (16 October 2011). "Making an Action Film". Nature Climate Change 1: 372–374. doi:10.1038/nclimate1257. 
  70. ^ Beattie, Geoff; Laura Sale and Laura McGuire (September 2011). "An Inconvenient Truth? Can a film really affect psychological mood and our explicit attitudes towards climate change?". Semiotica 2011 (187): 105–125. doi:10.1515/semi.2011.066.