Geoffrey Browne, 3rd Baron Oranmore and Browne

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Geoffrey Henry Browne, 3rd Baron Oranmore and Browne, 1st Baron Mereworth KP PC(Ire) (6 January 1861 – 30 June 1927), born Geoffrey Henry Browne-Guthrie, was an Irish politician.

Oranmore was the only son of the 2nd Baron Oranmore and Browne and his Scottish wife, Christina (née Guthrie). He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge and succeeded his father to the barony in 1900.[1] Following in his father's footsteps, he was elected an Irish Representative Peer in 1902. In 1906 he dropped the additional surname "Guthrie" which his father had been obliged to adopt in order to succeed to his own father-in-law's estates.

He was a Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for County Mayo and was appointed High Sheriff of Mayo for 1890. [2] He was a member of the Irish Convention in 1917–1918, a commissioner of the Congested Districts Board for Ireland from 1919, and a member of the Senate of Southern Ireland from 1921.

He was appointed Knight of the Order of St Patrick (KP) in 1918 and was appointed to the Privy Council for Ireland in the 1921 Birthday Honours.[3] In January 1926 he was raised to the Peerage of the United Kingdom as the 1st Baron Mereworth, of Mereworth Castle (his seat in Kent), although he continued to use his Irish title in preference.

He married Lady Olwen Verena, daughter of Edward Ponsonby, 8th Earl of Bessborough. He was succeeded by his son, Dominick Geoffrey Edward Browne. [2]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Browne (Browne-Guthrie), the Hon. Geoffrey Henry (BRWN880GH)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  2. ^ a b Kelly's Handbook to the Titled,Landed and Official Classes. 1916. 
  3. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 32346. p. 4530. 4 June 1921.

References[edit]

Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
Geoffrey Guthrie-Browne
Baron Oranmore and Browne
1902–1927
Succeeded by
Dominick Browne
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
New creation
Baron Mereworth
1926–1927
Succeeded by
Dominick Browne