Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize

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The Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize is a British literary prize established in 1963 in tribute to Geoffrey Faber, founder and first Chairman publisher Faber & Faber. It recognises a single volume of poetry or fiction by a United Kingdom, Irish or Commonwealth author under the 40 years of age on the date of publication, and is in alternating years awarded to poetry and fiction (including short stories).[1]

The prize is worth £1000.[2]

The prize jury, comprising three reviewers, is selected by literary editors of journals and newspapers that regularly publish reviews of poetry and fiction.[3]

In its first year, the prize was awarded to Christopher Middleton and George MacBeth for poetry. The first win by a short-story collection, The Quantity Theory of Insanity by Will Self, was in 1993.[3]

Winners[edit]

Year Author Title Section Jury Reference
1964 Christopher Middleton Torse 3 Poems 1949-1961 Poetry [4]
1964 George MacBeth The Broken Places: Poems Poetry [5]
1965 Frank Tuohy The Ice Saints Fiction [6]
1966 Jon Silkin Nature Within Man Poetry [7]
1967 William McIlvanney Remedy is None Fiction [8]
1967 John Noone The Man with the Chocolate Egg Fiction
1968 Seamus Heaney Death of a Naturalist Poetry [9]
1969 Piers Paul Read The Junkers Fiction [10]
1970 Geoffrey Hill King Log Poetry [11]
1971 J. G. Farrell Troubles Fiction [12]
1972 Tony Harrison The Loiners Poetry [13]
1973 David Storey Pasmore Fiction [14]
1974 John Fuller Cannibals and Missionaries and Epistles to Several Persons Poetry [15]
1975 Richard B. Wright In the Middle of a Life Fiction
1976 Douglas Dunn Love or Nothing Poetry [16]
1977 Carolyn Slaughter The Story of the Weasel Fiction
1978 David Harsent Dreams of the Dead Poetry [17]
1978 Kit Wright The Bear Looked Over the Mountain Poetry
1979 Timothy Mo The Monkey King Fiction [18]
1980 Hugo Williams Love-Life Poetry [19]
1980 George Szirtes The Slant Door Poetry [20]
1981 J. M. Coetzee Waiting for the Barbarians Fiction [21]
1982 Paul Muldoon Why Brownlee Left Poetry [22]
1982 Tom Paulin The Strange Museum Poetry [23]
1983 Graham Swift Shuttlecock Fiction [24]
1984 James Fenton In Memory of War: Poems 1968-83 Poetry
1985 Julian Barnes Flaubert's Parrot Fiction [25]
1986 David Scott A Quiet Gathering Poetry
1987 Guy Vanderhaeghe Man Descending Fiction [26]
1988 Michael Hofmann Acrimony: Poems Poetry [27]
1989 David Profumo Sea Music Fiction
1990 Michael Donaghy Shibboleth Poetry [28]
1991 Carol Birch The Fog Line Fiction [29]
1992 Paul Muldoon Madoc: A Mystery Poetry [22]
1993 Will Self The Quantity Theory of Insanity Fiction [30]
1994 John Burnside Feast Days Poetry Nicholas Tredell [31][32]
1995 Livi Michael Their Angel Reach Fiction [33]
1996 Kathleen Jamie The Queen of Sheba Poetry [34]
1997 Emily Perkins Not Her Real Name Fiction [35]
1998 Don Paterson God's Gift to Women Poetry Robert Potts [36]
1999 Gavin Kramer Shopping Fiction [37]
2000 Kathleen Jamie Jizzen Poetry Christina Patterson [38]
2001 Trezza Azzopardi The Hiding Place Fiction [39]
2002 Greta Stoddart At Home in the Dark Poetry [40]
2003 Justin Hill The Drink and Dream Teahouse Fiction
2004 Glyn Maxwell The Nerve: Poems Poetry [41]
2005 David Mitchell Cloud Atlas Fiction
2006 Alice Oswald Woods Etc. Poetry Neil Corcoran, Lavinia Greenlaw, Ciaran Carson [42][43]
2007 Edward Docx Self Help Fiction [44]
2008 Nick Laird On Purpose Poetry Jo Shapcott, Sam Leith, Michael Longley [9]
2009 David Szalay London and the South-East Fiction Kate Summerscale, Andrew Miller, Boyd Tonkin [45][46]
2010 Kona Macphee Perfect Blue Poetry Kate Kellaway, Bernard O'Donoghue, Stephen Romer [1][47]
2011 Belinda McKeon Solace Fiction Rachel Cusk, Jonathan Ruppin, Leo Robson [48]
2012 Jacob Polley The Havocs Poetry Jean Sprackland, Sarah Crown, Maurice Riordan [2]
2013 Eimear McBride A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing Fiction Deirdre Madden, Patrick Neale, Gaby Wood [49][50]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize". Faber.co.uk. Retrieved November 22, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Joshua Farrington (June 21, 2013). "Polley wins Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize". The Bookseller. 
  3. ^ a b Andrew Maunder (January 1, 2007). The Facts on File Companion to the British Short Story. Infobase Publishing. p. 23. ISBN 978-0-8160-7496-9. 
  4. ^ International Who's Who in Poetry 2005, p. 1070.
  5. ^ "MacBeth, George Mann". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/51192.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. ^ Dinah Birch (September 24, 2009). The Oxford Companion to English Literature. Oxford University Press. p. 1014. ISBN 978-0-19-280687-1. 
  7. ^ "Silkin, Jon". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/68498.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  8. ^ Ray 2007, p. 356.
  9. ^ a b Alison Flood (March 31, 2009). "Nick Laird follows idol Heaney to Faber prize win". The Guardian. 
  10. ^ Head 2006, p. 922.
  11. ^ "Hill, Sir Geoffrey (William)". Who's Who 2014. A&C Black. 2014. 
  12. ^ International Who's Who in Poetry 2005, p. 720.
  13. ^ Ray 2007, p. 232.
  14. ^ "Storey, David Malcolm". Who's Who 2014. A&C Black. 2014. 
  15. ^ International Who's Who in Poetry 2005, p. 557
  16. ^ "Dunn, Prof. Douglas Eaglesham". Who's Who 2014. A&C Black. 2014. 
  17. ^ International Who's Who in Poetry 2005, p. 684.
  18. ^ Ray 2007, p. 373.
  19. ^ International Who's Who in Poetry 2005, p. 1666.
  20. ^ "Szirtes, George Gábor Nicholas". Who's Who 2014. A&C Black. 2014. 
  21. ^ Alba della Fazia Amoia; Bettina Liebowitz Knapp (January 1, 2004). Multicultural Writers Since 1945: An A-to-Z Guide. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 156–. ISBN 978-0-313-30688-4. 
  22. ^ a b "Muldoon, Prof. Paul". Who's Who 2014. A&C Black. 2014. 
  23. ^ "Paulin, Thomas Neilson". Who's Who 2014. A&C Black. 2014. 
  24. ^ Philip Tew; Emily Horton; Leigh Wilson (February 27, 2014). The 1980s: A Decade of Contemporary British Fiction. A&C Black. pp. 247–. ISBN 978-1-4411-6853-5. 
  25. ^ Ray 2007, p. 35.
  26. ^ Nicholas von Maltzahn (January 1, 1991). "Guy Vanderheghe". In Jeffrey M. Heath. Profiles in Canadian Literature 8. Dundurn. p. 140. ISBN 978-1-55488-270-0. 
  27. ^ International Who's Who in Poetry 2005, p. 732.
  28. ^ Joshua Mehigan (April 2005). "The interior of a heron's egg: Michael Donaghy, 1954-2004". The New Criterion 23. Retrieved November 23, 2014. 
  29. ^ Head 2006, p. 104.
  30. ^ "Readers suggest the 10 best short-story collections". The Observer. October 22, 2014. 
  31. ^ International Who's Who in Poetry 2005, p. 242.
  32. ^ Colin Stanley (2011). Around the Outsider: Essays Presented to Colin Wilson on the Occasion of His 80th Birthday. John Hunt Publishing. p. 316. ISBN 978-1-84694-668-4. 
  33. ^ Head 2006, p. 739.
  34. ^ Matt McGuire; Colin Nicholson (September 1, 2009). The Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Poetry. Edinburgh University Press. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-7486-3626-6. 
  35. ^ Katy Guest (May 16, 2008). "Emily Perkins: The benefit of distance". The Independent. Retrieved November 22, 2014. 
  36. ^ International Who's Who in Poetry 2005, p. 1223.
  37. ^ Leza Lowitz (December 19, 2000). "Making mush of Meadowlark". The Japan Times. Retrieved November 22, 2014. 
  38. ^ Fiona Sampson (1 January 2004). Creative Writing in Health and Social Care. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. p. 229. ISBN 978-1-84310-136-9. 
  39. ^ "Azzopardi wins writing prize". BBC News. November 1, 2001. 
  40. ^ "Deep purple: how a humble weed inspired a collection of poetry". BBC Devon. November 20, 2008. Retrieved November 22, 2014. 
  41. ^ Ray 2007, p. 351.
  42. ^ "Dartington poet Alice Oswald wins £25k prize". Torquay Herald Express. September 25, 2013. 
  43. ^ "Poetry in the News: 2007". The Poetry Society. Retrieved November 23, 2014. 
  44. ^ Leyla Sanai (April 10, 2011). "The Devil's Garden, By Edward Docx". The Independent. Retrieved November 22, 2014. 
  45. ^ David Szalay (July 11, 2014). "Hampstead Heath". The Financial Times. 
  46. ^ Victoria Gallagher (June 1, 2010). "Debut author Szalay wins Geoffrey Faber prize". The Bookseller. 
  47. ^ Charlotte Williams (June 24, 2011). "Macphee wins Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize". The Bookseller. 
  48. ^ Joshua Farrington (July 19, 2012). "McKeon wins Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize". The Bookseller. 
  49. ^ Beth Webb (November 21, 2014). "Eimear McBride wins the 2013 Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize". The Daily Telegraph. 
  50. ^ "Eimear McBride wins Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize". The Irish Times. November 21, 2014. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]