Geoffrey Scowcroft Fletcher

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For the American filmmaker, see Geoffrey S. Fletcher.

Geoffrey Scowcroft Fletcher (1923–2004) was a British artist and art critic, and is best known for his 1962 book The London Nobody Knows.

Career[edit]

Fletcher was born in Bolton, Lancashire and educated at the University of London and the Slade School of Art and won a scholarship of the British School at Rome.[1] His drawings appeared in British newspapers such as The Guardian and The Sunday Times, and he worked for The Daily Telegraph, writing and illustrating a column, from 1962 to 1990. He used this medium to promote his drawings and texts about London, focusing on such mundane sights as gas lamps, Edwardian tea rooms, cast-iron lavatories and crumbling terraces. The term 'Geoffrey Fletcher London' is used to refer to his idiosyncratic descriptions.[2]

His best-known work, The London Nobody Knows, was made into a documentary film in 1967, directed by Norman Cohen and narrated by British actor James Mason.[3]

Bibliography[edit]

[4][5]

Personal papers[edit]

Islington Local History Centre holds artworks, sketchbooks and personal papers of Geoffrey Fletcher.[6]

London Metropolitan Archives (www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/lma) have sketchbooks and artworks by Geoffrey Fletcher. Some of which can be seen at: http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk/collage/app.

References[edit]