George Anderson (actor)

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George Anderson
Born March 6, 1886
New York City, New York U.S.
Died August 26, 1948 (aged 62)
London, England
Occupation actor
Years active 1915-–1948

George Anderson (March 6, 1886 – August 26, 1948)[1] was an American stage and film actor who appeared in 74 films and 25 Broadway productions in his 34 year career.[1][2]

Career[edit]

Born in New York City in 1886, Anderson made his Broadway debut on August 5, 1907 as the star of an original musical called The Time, the Place and the Girl. For the next ten years he continued to perform on the Great White Way in both musicals and plays – including Victor Herbert's The Duchess[3] – until the end of November 1917.[1] During about this same period, he also appeared in six movies, from 1915 to 1918, at a time when the nascent film industry was largely located in the New York City area.[2]

From 1922 to 1924 and from 1927 to 1936, Anderson again appeared on Broadway in musicals, comedies and melodramas, including The Strawberry Blonde, which he also directed,[4] frequently with about a year between each production, time during which it would be the normal procedure of the period for the production to tour the country.[1] Anderson appeared in two short films released in 1935 and 1936, when the film industry had largely relocated to California and become known as "Hollywood".[1][2]

After 1937, until 1948, Anderson worked consistently in films, playing small parts such as policemen, prison wardens, government officials, doctors and businessmen, as well as the occasional worker or bartender.[2] During this time Anderson became part of writer-director Preston Sturges' unofficial "stock company" of character actors, appearing in six films written and directed by Sturges, as well as one Sturges wrote but did not direct.[5] In 1944, he returned to Broadway for the last time, performing in Mae West's Catherine Was Great.[6]

Anderson's final film was Cy Endfield's The Argyle Secrets, released in 1948.[7] He died in London, England on August 26, 1948, at the age of 62.

References[edit]

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