George Clayson House

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George Clayson House
George Clayson House (Palatine, IL) 01.JPG
George Clayson House is located in Illinois
George Clayson House
Location 224 E. Palatine Rd., Palatine, Illinois
Coordinates 42°6′37.17″N 88°2′17.79″W / 42.1103250°N 88.0382750°W / 42.1103250; -88.0382750Coordinates: 42°6′37.17″N 88°2′17.79″W / 42.1103250°N 88.0382750°W / 42.1103250; -88.0382750
Area 0.4 acres (0.16 ha)
Built 1873
Architectural style Second Empire
Governing body Palatine Library District and Palatine Park District[2]
NRHP Reference # 79000835[1]
Added to NRHP March 21, 1979

The George Clayson House, located at 224 East Palatine Road in Palatine, Illinois, is a Second Empire home built in 1873 that has been restored to its 1890-1900 appearance.[2]

History[edit]

George H. Clayson was probably a local carpenter who also operated a grape orchard south of his property. Clayson moved to Palatine, Illinois from New York in the 1860s. He became a member of the Palatine Board of Trustees. Clayson acquired the 10-acre (4.0 ha) property from Denzel F. Robinson in 1873. Clayson sold the house to Moses D. Brown in 1881.[3] Clayson sold the property so that he could move to nearby Nunda to expand his orchard interests.[4] The Palatine Public Library purchased the property in 1975 so that the Palatine Historical Society could rehabilitate it and maintain it as a public museum.[3] On March 21, 1979, the house was recognized by the National Park Service with a listing on the National Register of Historic Places.[1] Today it is still operated as a museum on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays. It is operated by the historical society and maintained by the Palatine Park District.[5]

Architecture[edit]

The house is one of fewer than two dozen buildings in Palatine that are at least 125 years old. It was almost certainly based on a design in a pattern book. Customary to the Second Empire design motif, the house features a prominent Mansard roof. The first floor features a parlor, sitting room, dining room, kitchen, and library. The second floor had five bedrooms. The wood frame house sits on a brick foundation.[3]

Notes[edit]

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