George Darley

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George Darley (1795–1846) was an Irish poet, novelist, and critic.

Biography[edit]

He was born in Dublin, and educated at Trinity College. Having decided to follow a literary career, in 1820 he went to London.

Darley fell into depression, and died on 23 November 1846 in London. Playwright Dion Boucicault was a nephew. His grandnephew was the Irish musician Arthur Warren Darley.

Works[edit]

Darley published his first poem, Errors of Ecstasie, in 1822. He also wrote for the London Magazine, under the pseudonym of John Lacy. In it appeared his best-known story, Lilian of the Vale. Various other books followed, including Sylvia, or The May Queen, a poem (1827).

Thereafter Darley joined the Athenaeum, in which he became a severe critic. He was also a dramatist and studied old English plays, editing those of Beaumont and Fletcher in 1840. His poem "It is not beauty I desire" was included by F. T. Palgrave in the first edition of his Golden Treasury as an anonymous lyric of the 17th century.

Darley wrote a number of songs such as “I've been Roaming”, once popular, and praised by Samuel Taylor Coleridge.[1]

He was also a mathematician, and published some treatises on the subject.

Other works included:

  • Nepenthe
  • Thomas a Beckett; ADramatic Chronical
  • Popular Algebra
  • Familiar Astronomy, Darley, G., Taylor & W. London, 1830.

Reputation[edit]

A. E. Housman said of a passage from his poem Nepenthe, "Admirers of the sea may call that a lampoon or a caricature, but they cannot deny that it is life-like: the man who wrote it had seen the sea, and the man who reads it sees the sea again".[2]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainCousin, John William (1910). "Darley, George". A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature. London: J. M. Dent & Sons. Wikisource


References[edit]

  1. ^ The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)
  2. ^ A.E.Housman, Swinburne, in Collected Poems and Selected Prose (Penguin Books, 1989), at page 292.

External links[edit]