George Gordon Meade Memorial

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Meade Memorial
Major-General George G. Meade
Artist Charles Grafly
Year 1927 (1927)
Type Tennessee marble
Dimensions 323 cm (127.2 in); 270 cm diameter (108 in)
Location Washington, D.C.
Owner

National Park Service

George Gordon Meade Memorial
George Gordon Meade Memorial is located in Washington, D.C.
George Gordon Meade Memorial
Location Washington, D.C.
Coordinates 38°53′31.67″N 77°0′59.2″W / 38.8921306°N 77.016444°W / 38.8921306; -77.016444Coordinates: 38°53′31.67″N 77°0′59.2″W / 38.8921306°N 77.016444°W / 38.8921306; -77.016444
Governing body National Park Service
Part of Civil War Monuments in Washington, DC.
NRHP Reference # 78000257[1]
Added to NRHP September 20, 1978 [2]

Meade Memorial, is a public artwork by American artist Charles Grafly, located at 3rd & Pennsylvania Avenue N.W. in Washington, D.C., USA. Meade Memorial was originally surveyed as part of the Smithsonian's Save Outdoor Sculpture! survey in 1993. The monument is a tribute to United States Army officer George Meade.

The statue is a contributing monument to the Civil War Monuments in Washington, DC, of the National Register of Historic Places.

Description[edit]

This cylinder shaped statue features a figure of General George Meade on the proper front and a figure of War on the proper back, surrounded by six figures standing side by side. The six figures, all allegorical representations of Loyalty, Chivalry, Fame, Progress, Military Courage and Energy, were used by Grafly to show what he believed are traits needed to make a "great general.[3]

George-gordon-meade-memorial-closeup.jpg

To Meade's proper right is a male figure of Loyalty, and to his proper left is a female figure of Chivalry, who are shown removing Meade's cloak, which symbolizes the "cloak of battle." Above Meade's head Loyalty holds a wreath and garlands representing the generals deeds. Behind Loyalty stands a female figure of Fame who is supported by a male figure of Energy. Behind the figure of Chivalry is a male figure of Progress and behind him a male figure of Military Courage, who locks arms with War. Winged War is flanked by two memorial tablets. At the top of the monument is a gold finial with the state seal of Pennsylvania.

SOS! describes the statue as showing Meade "represented as the embodiment of all six allegorical qualities as he emerges from his cloak of battle and progresses into his future."[3]

The sculpture is signed:

CHARLES GRAFLY.SC.
.MCMXX-MCMXXV
EXECUTED BY PICCIRILLI BROS

The back of the base features the inscription:

EDWARD P. SIMON
GRANT M. SIMON
ARCHITECTS

And the lower front of the base has inscribed in bronze, lowercase letters:

meade

and in uppercase letters:

THE COMMONWEALTH
OF PENNSYLVANIA
TO MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE GORDON MEADE
WHO COMMANDED
THE UNION FORCES
AT GETTYSBURG

(signed Founder's mark appears)[3]

Information[edit]

Winged War flanked by two memorial tablets.

Residents of the state of Pennsylvania commissioned the sculpture on October 18, 1913. Authorized by an act of Congress on January 21, 1915, ground breaking took place eight years later on March 28, 1922 after approval of the sculpture design by the United States Commission of Fine Arts and the state of Pennsylvania. The Memorial, which cost $400,000,[4] was originally installed at Union Square near the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial,[4] only to be moved into National Park Service storage in 1966[5] due to construction. In 1983 it was finally installed at its current location.[3]

Artist[edit]

Main article: Charles Grafly

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  2. ^ "Civil War Monuments in Washington, DC". National Park Service. September 20, 1978. Retrieved August 10, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d SOS! (1993). "Meade Memorial (sculpture).". Save Outdoor Sculpture. Smithsonian. Retrieved 28 November 2010. 
  4. ^ a b "President Accepts Meade Memorial In Behalf of Country" in The Washington Post, October 20, 1927 (Washington D.C.) p1
  5. ^ Joseph McLellan, “Arts Beat: Back in Place” contained in The Washington Post, August 17, 1983, (Washington DC) pg. B7

External links[edit]