George Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall

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The Most Honourable

The Marquess of Donegall

KP, GCH, PC
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard
In office
11 February 1848 – 21 February 1852
Monarch Victoria
Prime Minister Lord John Russell
Preceded by The Viscount Falkland
Succeeded by The Lord de Ros
Personal details
Born 10 February 1797
Great Cumberland Place, London
Died 20 October 1883
Brighton, Sussex
Nationality British
Political party Tory
Whig
Spouse(s) (1) Lady Harriet Butler
(d. 1860)
(2) Harriet Graham
(d. 1884)
Alma mater Christ Church, Oxford

George Hamilton Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall KP, GCH, PC (10 February 1797 – 20 October 1883), styled Viscount Chichester until 1799 and Earl of Belfast between 1799 and 1844, was an Anglo-Irish landowner, courtier and politician. He served as Vice-Chamberlain of the Household between 1830 and 1834 and between 1838 and 1841 and as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard between 1848 and 1852. Ennobled in his own right in 1841, he was also Lord-Lieutenant of Antrim from 1841 to 1883 and made a Knight of St Patrick in 1857.

Background and education[edit]

Chichester was born at Great Cumberland Place, London, the eldest son of George Chichester, 2nd Marquess of Donegall, by his wife Anna May, daughter of Sir Edward May, 2nd Baronet. He was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, before serving for a time as a Captain with the 11th Hussars. He was known by the courtesy title Viscount Chichester from birth until 1799 and as Earl of Belfast from 1799 to 1844.[1]

Political career[edit]

In 1818 Chichester was elected to the House of Commons as Member of Parliament (MP) for Carrickfergus,[2] and two years later became representative for Belfast.[3] In July 1830 he was sworn of the Privy Council[4] and appointed Vice-Chamberlain of the Household in the Duke of Wellington's Tory administration.[5] In August he was returned to parliament for Antrim.[6] He continued as Vice-Chamberlain after Lord Grey formed his Whig government in November 1830. In 1831 he was made a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Guelphic Order. He remained as Vice-Chamberlain until 1834, the last months under the premiership of Lord Melbourne.[7] In 1837 he was once again returned to parliament for Belfast.[3] He did not initially serve in Melbourne's second administration, but in 1838 he once again became Vice-Chamberlain of the Household.[8] He resigned when the government fell in 1841[1] and the same year he unsuccessfully contested Belfast as a Liberal candidate in 1841.[citation needed] He was instead raised to the Peerage of the United Kingdom in his own right as Baron Ennishowen and Carrickfergus, of Ennishowen in the County of Donegal and of Carrickfergus in the County of Antrim.[9] He sat in the House of Lords at Westminster for three years under this title before succeeding his father in the marquessate in 1844.[1]

Lord Donegall did not serve initially in Lord John Russell first administration, but in 1848 he returned to the government as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard. He resigned along with the rest of the Whig government in early 1852. Apart from his political career he was also Lord Lieutenant of Antrim from 1841 to 1883.[1] In 1857 he was made a Knight of the Order of St Patrick.[1][10] At the time of his death in 1883 he was the senior member of the Privy Council.[citation needed]

Family[edit]

Lord Donegall married Lady Harriet Anne Butler, daughter of Richard Butler, 1st Earl of Glengall, in 1822. They had three children:

  • Lady Harriet Augusta Anna Seymourina Chichester (d. 14 April 1898), married Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 8th Earl of Shaftesbury.
  • George Augustus Chichester, Viscount Chichester (26 May 1826–18 June 1827).
  • Frederick Richard Chichester, Earl of Belfast (25 November 1827–11 February 1853), died in Naples, unmarried.

After his first wife's death in September 1860, he married as his second wife Harriett Graham, daughter of Sir Bellingham Reginald Graham, 7th Baronet, and widow of Sir Frederick Ashworth, in 1862. There were no children from this marriage. Lord Donegall died in Brighton, Sussex, in October 1883, aged 86, and was buried in Belfast.[1] As both his sons had predeceased him the larger part of the Donegall estates were inherited by his only daughter, Lady Harriet Augusta Anna Seymourina Chichester, wife of Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 8th Earl of Shaftesbury.[citation needed] The barony of Ennishowen and Carrickfergus died with him while he was succeeded in the marquessate by his younger brother, Lord Edward Chichester. The Marchioness of Donegall died in March 1884.[1]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Arthur Chichester
Member of Parliament for Carrickfergus
1818–1820
Succeeded by
Sir Arthur Chichester, Bt
Preceded by
Arthur Chichester
Member of Parliament for Belfast
1820–1830
Succeeded by
Sir Arthur Chichester, Bt
Preceded by
Edmond Alexander McNaghten
Member of Parliament for Antrim
1830–1837
Succeeded by
John Irving
Preceded by
James Emerson Tennent
George Dunbar
Member of Parliament for Belfast
with James Gibson

1837–1838
Succeeded by
James Emerson Tennent
George Dunbar
Political offices
Preceded by
Sir Samuel Hulse
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household
1830–1834
Succeeded by
Viscount Castlereagh
Preceded by
Lord Charles FitzRoy
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household
1838–1841
Succeeded by
Lord Ernest Bruce
Preceded by
The Viscount Falkland
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard
1848–1852
Succeeded by
The Lord de Ros
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl O'Neill
Lord Lieutenant of Antrim
1841–1883
Succeeded by
The Lord Waveney
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
George Augustus Chichester
Marquess of Donegall
1844–1883
Succeeded by
Edward Chichester
Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Baron Ennishowen and Carrickfergus
1841–1883
Extinct