George Henry Moore (runholder)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

George Henry Moore (12 October 1812 – 7 July 1905), derogatorily known as Scabbie Moore, was a New Zealand runholder. He was born in Billown, Isle of Man on 12 October 1812. As a young man, he worked on Mona Vale Station in Tasmania, where he married the owner's daughter. He was later the owner of Glenmark Station north of Waipara, which for a time was New Zealand's largest sheep run.[1]

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust has four separate listings on Glenmark Station. Moore had a mansion constructed for him, which took seven years to build. It was finished in 1888, but burned out on 23 January 1891.[2][3] The two-storey house had cost around ₤15,000 to build and the furniture was valued at around ₤10,000; there was no insurance.[4] The ruins have a Category II classification.[5] The horse stables, built of concrete in ca. 1881 for up to 50 horses, gave expression to his wealth. The stables are of considerable technological importance (due to the early use of concrete) and have a Category I listing.[6] The Glenmark Station Lodge is listed as a Category II building and still in use.[7] The Station Manager's House is disused these days and registered as Category II.[8]

Moore died at Christchurch in 1905, having been blind for several years.[1] With her inheritance, his daughter purchased a property in Christchurch, which she renamed Mona Vale after her mother's property.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gardner, W. J. "Moore, George Henry - Biography". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 4 September 2012. 
  2. ^ "Glenmark". Christchurch City Libraries. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "Fires". The Star (7071). 24 January 1891. p. 4. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  4. ^ "Glenmark Fire". Volume XLVIII, Issue 7770, 26 January 1891. p. 6. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  5. ^ "Glenmark - ruins of original house". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 4 September 2012. 
  6. ^ "Glenmark Station Stables". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 4 September 2012. 
  7. ^ "Glenmark Station Lodge". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 4 September 2012. 
  8. ^ "Glenmark Station Manager's House". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 4 September 2012. 
  9. ^ "Unsung Heroines - Annie Quayle Townend". Christchurch City Libraries. Retrieved 3 July 2011.