George Howard (British Army officer)

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Sir George Howard
Sir George Howard.jpg
Sir George Howard
Born 17 June 1718
Died 16 July 1796 (aged 78)
Grosvenor Square, London
Buried at Great Bookham, Surrey
Allegiance  Kingdom of Great Britain
Service/branch  British Army
Years of service 1736–1796
Rank Field Marshal
Commands held 3rd Regiment of Foot
Battles/wars War of the Austrian Succession
Jacobite Rebellion
Seven Years' War
Awards Knight Companion of the Order of the Bath

Field Marshal Sir George Howard KB, PC (17 June 1718 – 16 July 1796) was a British military officer and politician. After commanding the 3rd Regiment of Foot at the Battle of Fontenoy in May 1745 during the War of the Austrian Succession and after commanding that regiment again at the Battle of Falkirk Muir and the Battle of Culloden during the Jacobite Rebellion, he returned to the continent and fought at the Battle of Lauffeld. He went on to command a brigade at the Battle of Warburg during the Seven Years' War. He subsequently became the Governor of Minorca.

Military career[edit]

Born the son of Lieutenant General Thomas Howard and his wife Mary Howard (née Moreton, daughter of William Moreton, Bishop of Meath), Howard was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford and was commissioned as a lieutenant in his father's regiment (later the 24th Regiment of Foot) in 1736.[1] He was promoted to captain in 1737 and transferred to the 3rd Regiment of Foot in 1739.[2] Promoted to lieutenant colonel on 2 April 1744, he commanded the 3rd Regiment of Foot at the Battle of Fontenoy in May 1745 during the War of the Austrian Succession.[2]

Howard commanded the 3rd Regiment of Foot again, under the Duke of Cumberland, at the Battle of Falkirk Muir in January 1746 and the Battle of Culloden in April 1746 during the Jacobite Rebellion and was accused of treating the defeated highlanders unduely harshly.[2] He then returned to the continent and fought at the Battle of Lauffeld in July 1747.[2] He succeeded his father as colonel of the 3rd Regiment of Foot in August 1749.[3] He went on to take part in the Raid on Rochefort in September 1757 and, having been promoted to major-general on 24 January 1758,[4] he commanded a brigade, under the Marquess of Granby, at the Battle of Warburg in July 1760 during the Seven Years' War.[3] He was promoted to lieutenant-general on 14 March 1761.[5]

Howard became Member of Parliament (MP) for Lostwithiel in 1761 and, having been appointed a Knight Companion of the Bath in early 1763, he became colonel of the 7th (The Queen's Own) Regiment of Dragoons in August 1763.[3] He acquired Stoke Place in Buckinghamshire for use as a country home in 1764.[6]

Howard stood down from Parliament and became Governor of Minorca in 1766.[3] After retiring as Governor of Minorca, he became Governor of the Royal Hospital Chelsea in February 1768[7] and was elected as Member of Parliament for Stamford that same year.[3]

Promoted to full general on 6 September 1777,[8] Howard became colonel of the 1st (The King's) Dragoon Guards in April 1779.[9] He was promoted to field marshal on 18 October 1793[10] and appointed to the honorary post of Governor of Jersey in July 1795.[11] He died at his London home in Grosvenor Square on 16 July 1796 and was buried at Great Bookham in Surrey.[3]

Family[edit]

In February 1747 Howard married Lady Lucy Wentworth (daughter of Sir William Wentworth of Northgate Head); they had one daughter.[12] After the death of his first wife, Howard married Elizabeth Beckford; there were no children by the second marriage.[1]

Plan of the Battle of Warburg where Howard led his brigade to victory

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Sir George Howard". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 13 July 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d Heathcote, p. 179
  3. ^ a b c d e f Heathcote, p. 180
  4. ^ The London Gazette: no. 9759. p. 1. 21 January 1758. Retrieved 13 July 2014.
  5. ^ The London Gazette: no. 10086. p. 2. 10 March 1761. Retrieved 13 July 2014.
  6. ^ "Parishes: Stoke Poges, A History of the County of Buckingham: Volume 3 (1925),". p. 302-313. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  7. ^ "Survey of London, volume 11, edited by Walter H. Godfrey (editor)". 1927. Retrieved 13 July 2014. 
  8. ^ The London Gazette: no. 11802. p. 2. 2 September 1777. Retrieved 13 July 2014.
  9. ^ The London Gazette: no. 11972. p. 2. 20 April 1779. Retrieved 13 July 2014.
  10. ^ The London Gazette: no. 13582. p. 913. 15 October 1793. Retrieved 13 July 2014.
  11. ^ The London Gazette: no. 13796. p. 747. 14 July 1795. Retrieved 13 July 2014.
  12. ^ "Lady Lucy Wentworth". The Peerage.com. Retrieved 13 July 2014. 

Sources[edit]

Assembly seats
Preceded by
James Edward Colleton
Thomas Clarke
Member of Parliament for Lostwithiel
with James Edward Colleton

1761–1766
Succeeded by
James Edward Colleton
Viscount Beauchamp
Preceded by
George Bridges Brudenell
George René Aufrère
Member of Parliament for Stamford
with George René Aufrère 1768–1774
Henry Cecil 1774–1790
The Earl of Carysfort 1790–1796

1768–1796
Succeeded by
The Earl of Carysfort
John Leland
Military offices
Preceded by
Thomas Howard
Colonel of the 3rd Regiment of Foot
1749–1763
Succeeded by
John Craufurd
Preceded by
John Mostyn
Colonel of the 7th (The Queen's Own) Regiment of Dragoons
1763–1779
Succeeded by
Sir Henry Clinton
Colonel of the 1st (The King's) Dragoon Guards
1779–1796
Succeeded by
Sir William Augustus Pitt
Preceded by
Richard Lyttelton
Governor of Minorca
1766–1768
Succeeded by
John Mostyn
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Sir Robert Rich
Governor, Royal Hospital Chelsea
1768–1795
Succeeded by
The Marquess Townshend