George I. Barnett

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George I. Barnett
Barnett George Ingham.jpg
Born George Ingham Barnett
1815
Nottingham, England
Died 1898
St. Louis, MO
Nationality American
Buildings Missouri Governor's Mansion, Tower Grove House, Henry Shaw Mausoleum

George Ingham Barnett (1815–1898) was an architect from St. Louis, MO. He was called The Dean of St. Louis Architecture for his contributions to the buildings of St. Louis as well as for his influence on other architects in the United States.[1]

Early life in England[edit]

Barnett was born in Nottingham, England. He completed a classical education by the age of 16, then trained with Sir Thomas Hine at a builder in Nottingham, and then took on an apprenticeship with an architectural firm in London. Barnett left England for the United States in early 1839, remaining in New York City for six months before departing for St. Louis.[2]

Work in St. Louis[edit]

Barnett designed hundreds of buildings in St. Louis, many in Greek Revival, Italianate, and Gothic design. Barnett did not deviate from classical designs, and his portfolio was largely responsible for establishing Classicism as St. Louis' dominate architectural influence.[3] His works included houses, churches, commercial, and civic structures. Among his best known structures are renovations to the Old Courthouse, the Missouri Governor's mansion, the structures of the Missouri Botanical Garden, Tower Grove Park, and the Southern Hotel.[4]

Influence on other architects[edit]

Barnett's son, Thomas P. Barnett, trained with the elder Barnett and went on to design such American landmarks as the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis and the Adolphus Hotel in Dallas. His other son, George D. Barnett, and his son-in-law, John Ignatius Haynes, joined Tom Barnett to form the architectural firm of Barnett, Haynes & Barnett.[5] His eldest son, Absalom J. Barnett, became a successful architect in San Francisco.[6]

Other notable architects who apprenticed under Barnett included Henry G. Isaacs, Alfred H. Piquenard, Charles F. May, William Kirchner, Isaac Taylor, and George Strafford Mills.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sharoff, Robert. American City, St. Louis Architecture, Three Centuries of Classic Design. The Images Publishing Group, 2010, p. xi
  2. ^ Hyde, William & Conard, Howard Louis. Encyclopedia of the History of St. Louis. The Southern History Company, 1899.
  3. ^ Sharoff, Robert. American City, St. Louis Architecture, Three Centuries of Classic Design. The Images Publishing Group, 2010, p. xi
  4. ^ Sharoff, Robert. American City, St. Louis Architecture, Three Centuries of Classic Design. The Images Publishing Group, 2010, p. xi
  5. ^ Leonard, John W. The Book of St. Louisans. The St. Louis Republic, 1906, p. 38.
  6. ^ https://digital.lib.washington.edu/architect/architects/3113/
  7. ^ Hyde, William & Conard, Howard Louis. Encyclopedia of the History of St. Louis. The Southern History Company, 1899.