George Landow (professor)

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George P. Landow is Professor of English and Art History at Brown University. He is a leading authority on Victorian literature, art, and culture, as well as a pioneer in criticism and theory of Electronic literature, hypertext and hypermedia. He also pioneered the use of hypertext and the web in higher education.

Work[edit]

George Landow has published extensively on the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, specifically the life and works of William Holman Hunt and John Ruskin.

Landow is also a leading theorist of hypertext,[1] of the effects of digital technology on language, and of electronic media on literature. While his early work on hypertext sought to establish design rules for efficient hypertext communication,[2] he is especially noted for his book Hypertext: The Convergence of Contemporary Literary Theory and Technology, first published in 1992, which is considered a "landmark"[3] in the academic study of electronic writing systems,[4] and states the view that the interpretive agenda of post-structuralist literary theory anticipated the essential characteristics of hypertext.[3]

In Hypertext Landow draws on theorists such as Jacques Derrida, Roland Barthes, Gilles Deleuze, Paul de Man, and Michel Foucault, among others,[1] and argues, especially, that hypertext embodies the textual openness championed by post-structuralist theory and that hypertext enables people to develop knowledge in a non-linear, non-sequential, associative way that linear texts do not.[5]

Landow also pioneered the use of the web in higher education with projects such as The Victorian Web, The Contemporary, Postcolonial, & Postimperial Literature in English web[1], and The Cyberspace, Hypertext, & Critical Theory web[2].[6]

Select works[edit]

  • Hypertext 3.0 : Critical Theory and New Media in an Era of Globalization. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006. ISBN 0801882567
  • Hypertext 2.0. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997. ISBN 0801855853
  • Hypertext : The Convergence of Contemporary Critical Theory and Technology. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992. ISBN 0801842808
  • Hyper/Text/Theory, 1994
  • Hypermedia and Literary Studies, 1994 (with Paul Delany)
  • The Digital Word: Text-Based Computing in the Humanities, 1993 (with Paul Delany)
  • Elegant Jeremiahs: The Sage from Carlyle to Mailer, 1986
  • A Pre-Raphaelite Friendship: The Correspondence of William Holman Hunt and John Lucas Tupper, 1986
  • Ladies of Shalott: A Victorian Masterpiece and Its Contexts, 1985
  • Images of Crisis: Literary Iconology, 1750 to the Present, 1982
  • Victorian Types, Victorian Shadows; Biblical Typology in Victorian Literature, Art, and Thought, 1980
  • Approaches to Victorian Autobiography, 1979
  • William Holman Hunt and Typological Symbolism, 1979
  • The Aesthetic and Critical Theories of John Ruskin, 1972

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Goody, Alex (2011). Technology, Literature and Culture. Cambridge: Polity. p. 123. ISBN 9780745639536. 
  2. ^ Aarseth, Espen J. (1997). Cybertext: Perspectives on Ergodic Literature. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 90. ISBN 0801855780. 
  3. ^ a b Hayles, N. Katherine (2007-01-02). "Electronic Literature: What is it?". The Electronic Literature Organization. Retrieved 2013-01-03. 
  4. ^ "George P. Landow". Eastgate. 2003. Retrieved January 3, 2013. 
  5. ^ White, Andy (2007). "Understanding hypertext cognition: Developing mental models to aid users’ comprehension". First Monday 12 (1). Retrieved 2012-12-30. 
  6. ^ Bolter, J. David (2000). Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print (2nd ed.). Mahwah, N.J: Erlbaum. pp. 116–117. ISBN 0805829199. 

External links[edit]