George Grant MacCurdy

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George Grant MacCurdy in 1924

George Grant MacCurdy, A.M., Ph.D. (April 17, 1863 – November 15, 1947) was an American anthropologist, born at Warrensburg, Mo., where he graduated from the State Normal School in 1887, after which he attended Harvard (A.B., 1893; A.M., 1894); then studied in Europe at Vienna, Paris (School of Anthropology), and at Berlin (1894-98; and at Yale (Ph.D., 1905).[1] He was employed at Yale from 1902 onwards as instructor, lecturer, curator of the anthropological collections (1902-10), and assistant professor of archæology after 1910.[2]

European hypothesis[edit]

MacCurdy argued for Europe as the origin of the first humans, in his 1924 book Human Origins, he said: “The beginnings of things human, so far as we have been able to discover them, have their fullest exemplification in Europe”.[3]

Works[edit]

He was the author of:

  • Obsidian razor of the Aztecs (1900)
  • The Eolithic Problem (1905)
  • Some Phases of Prehistoric Archœology (1907)
  • Recent Discoveries Bearing on the Antiquity of Man in Europe (1910)
  • A Study of Chiriquian Antiquities (1911)
  • Review of Mayan Art (1913)
  • Human Skulls from Gazelle Peninsula (1914)
  • Human Origins (1924)
  • The Coming of Man, USA: The University Society, 1935. First published 1932, retrieved 10 October 2011 

References[edit]