George Manners, 11th Baron de Ros

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George Manners, 11th Baron Ros of Helmsley
MannersArmsUnaugmented.PNG
Arms of Manners (unaugmented): Or, two bars azure a chief gules, as visible impaling St Leger in a window of the Rutland Chantry, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. The later chief quarterly azure and gules; in the 1st and 4th quarters two fleurs-de-lis and in the 2nd and 3rd a lion passant guardant all or was granted as an augmentation by King Henry VIII to his son Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland at the time of his creation as Earl of Rutland, in recognition of his descent in the maternal line from King Edward III.[1]
Spouse(s) Anne St. Leger

Issue

Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland
Oliver Manners
Anthony Manners
Sir Richard Manners
John Manners
Anne Manners
Eleanor Manners
Elizabeth Manners
Katherine Manners
Cecily Manners
Margaret Manners
Father Sir Robert Manners
Mother Eleanor Ros
Born c. 1470
Died 27 October 1513
Helmsley Castle, seat of the Manners family
Heraldic glass in the Rutland Chapel, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, erected in 1849 by Charles Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland. It shows far left the arms of Anne of York, Duchess of Exeter (1439-1476) impaled by the arms of her 1st husband Henry Holland, 3rd Duke of Exeter. To the right of the last are her arms impaled by the arms of her 2nd husband Sir Thomas St Leger (c.1440-1483), KG. The rightmost window shows top: the arms of Anne's daughter Anne St Leger impaled by the arms of her husband George Manners, 11th Baron de Ros (c.1470-1513). Below are the arms of his son Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland (c.1492-1543) impaling the arms of his 2nd wife Eleanor Paston

George Manners, 11th Baron de Ros of Helmsley (c. 1470 – 27 October 1513) was an English peer.

Family[edit]

George Manners, born about 1470, was the son of Sir Robert Manners (d. 1495) of Etal, Northumberland, and Eleanor de Ros or Roos (d. 1487), eldest daughter of Thomas de Ros, 9th Baron de Ros, (9 September 1427 – 17 May 1464), and Philippa Tiptoft (c. 1423 – after 30 January 1487), daughter of John Tiptoft, 1st Baron Tiptoft and Powis.[2] He had a brother and two sisters:[3]

  • Edward Manners.

Career[edit]

Manners was enrolled at Lincoln's Inn on 12 May 1490. In 1508 he was coheir to his uncle, Edmund de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros. In 1492 it had been determined that Edmund de Ros was unable to administer his own affairs, and he was placed in the custody of his brother-in-law, Sir Thomas Lovell, husband of Manners' aunt, Isabel Lovell. Edmund de Ros died 23 October 1508, and was buried in the parish church at Elsing in Enfield, Middlesex. In about 1509 Manners was sole heir to his aunt, Isabel Lovell.[5]

Manners was with Thomas Howard, then Earl of Surrey, in the Scottish campaign of 1497, and was knighted by him on or before 30 September of that year. He was in attendance in 1500 when King Henry VII met Archduke Philip near Calais. In November 1501 he was among those who received Catherine of Aragon at St. George's Field. He was nominated to the Order of the Garter on 27 April 1510, although not elected.[6]

In 1513 Manners campaigned in France. He was a commander at the siege of Thérouanne, and was present at the siege of Tournai. He fell ill about the time Tournai surrendered on 23 September 1513.[7]

Manners died 27 October 1513, either in France or at Holywell in Shoreditch. He may have been first buried at Holywell, and his body later removed to St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. His effigy is in the Rutland Chapel.[citation needed] His widow, Anne, died 21 April 1526, and was buried at St. George's, Windsor.[8]

Manners owned a medieval manuscript copy of a chanson de geste, Les Voeux du Paon (The Vows of the Peacock), by Jacques de Longuyon, which is now Spencer Collection MS 009 in the New York Public Library. Manners wrote his name on a flyleaf of the manuscript, folio i verso, which may be viewed online.[1]

Marriage and issue[edit]

Manners married, about 1490, Anne St. Leger (c.1475/6 – 21 April 1526), daughter and heiress of Thomas St. Leger by Anne of York, Duchess of Exeter, the second child and eldest surviving daughter of Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York, and Cecily Neville (1415–1495), daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.[9] Anne of York was the elder sister of King Edward IV; Edmund, Earl of Rutland; Elizabeth of York, Duchess of Suffolk; Margaret of York, Duchess of Burgundy; George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence and King Richard III.

George Manners and Anne St. Leger had five sons and six daughters:[10]

Monument[edit]

His monument, consisting of a grand chest tomb with sculpted effigies of himself and his wife, survives in the Rutland Chantry (formerly the St Leger Chantry, founded by his father-in-law Sir Thomas St Leger) forming the north transept of St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. The base of the monument and the stained glass windows display much heraldry of the Manners and St Leger families.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ (Via Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York) The general armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, Comprising a Registry of Armorial Bearings from the Earliest to the Present Time by Sir Bernard Burke, 1884 edition, p. 656
  2. ^ Cokayne 1949, pp. 105–8; Richardson III 2011, pp. 125, 459–61.
  3. ^ Richardson III 2011, p. 125.
  4. ^ Richardson I 2011, p. 211; Richardson III 2011, p. 125.
  5. ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 125, 460; Cokayne 1949, p. 107.
  6. ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 107.
  7. ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 107; Richardson III 2011, p. 125.
  8. ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 108; Richardson III 2011, p. 125.
  9. ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 108; Richardson III 2011, p. 125.
  10. ^ Richardson III 2011, p. 125.

References[edit]

  • Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White XI. London: St. Catherine Press. pp. 105–8. 
  • Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City.  ISBN 1449966373
  • Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City.  ISBN 144996639X

External links[edit]

Peerage of England
Preceded by
Edmund de Ros
Baron de Ros
c. 1512–1513
Succeeded by
Thomas Manners