George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer

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For other people named George Neville, see George Neville (disambiguation).
George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer
Spouse(s) Elizabeth Beauchamp

Issue

Sir Henry Neville
Thomas Neville
Jane Neville
Katherine Neville
Noble family House of Neville
Father Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland
Mother Lady Joan Beaufort
Born c.1407
Died 30 December 1469

George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer or (Latymer) (c. 1407 – 30 December 1469) was an English peer.

George Neville was the fifth son of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, by his second wife Lady Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster. He succeeded to the Latymer estates on the death of his half-uncle John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer, in 1430 (see Baron Latimer), and on 25 February 1432 he was summoned to Parliament as Baron Latimer.[1]

Lord Latimer later fought in Scotland in 1436,[1] was a Justice of the Peace for Cumberland in 1437 and admitted to the Privy Council in 1439.

In 1437, Lord Latimer married Lady Elizabeth (1417–1480), daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick, by his first wife, Elizabeth Berkeley.[1] They had four children:

George Neville appears to have suffered from some form of dementia in his later years, as he was described as an "idiot," and the guardianship of his lands was given to his nephew, Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, the Kingmaker.[1] George Neville, Lord Latimer, died on 30 December 1469 and was succeeded in the barony by his grandson Richard, his eldest son Sir Henry Neville having predeceased him by several months, dying at the Battle of Edgecote Moor, 26 July 1469.[1]

Ancestry[edit]

Peerage of England
Preceded by
New Creation
Baron Latimer
1432–1469
Succeeded by
Richard Nevill

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Burke, John (1831). A General and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, Extinct, Dormant, and in Abeyance. London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 392. Retrieved 2009-07-17. 
  2. ^ G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910–1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 560.

Further reading[edit]