George Cambridge (priest)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from George Owen Cambridge)
Jump to: navigation, search

George Owen Cambridge (1756–1841) was an English churchman, Archdeacon of Middlesex from 1808.[1]

Life[edit]

He was the youngest son of Richard Owen Cambridge and Mary Trenchard.[2] He matriculated at The Queen's College, Oxford in 1774, and graduated B.A. there in 1778. He then became a Fellow of Merton College, Oxford and graduated M.A. there in 1781.[3][4]

Cambridge was a supposed suitor of Frances Burney. Nothing came in the way of romance, though Sir William Weller Pepys, a friend of Burney, tried to throw the couple together.[5] They had met through the Bluestockings; Burney's apparent interest in him was not returned.[6]

Cambridge was rector of Myland in Essex from 1791 to 1795.[7] He was a chaplain to Charles Manners-Sutton,[8] and prebendary of Ely Cathedral from 1795.[9] He became a good friend of Joshua Watson, a figure of the Hackney Phalanx group of High Church men.[10] Cambridge was Archdeacon of Middlesex from 1808 to 1840, when he resigned.[11] He became proprietor of Montpelier Row chapel, in Twickenham (unconsecrated).[12][13] In 1814, when Watson, John Bowdler and James Alan Park saw the need for an urgent church building programme, they called on Cambridge and Charles Daubeny for action.[14] He was Treasurer to the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge and the Clergy Orphan Schools.[3] He was involved also in King's College London and the National Society for Promoting Religious Education.[15]

Cambridge came into possession of his father's house, Twickenham Meadows, in 1823.[16] The house had been renamed Cambridge House in 1802. Cambridge divided the estate in 1835.[17]

Twickenham Meadows, engraving by John Landseer after John Webber (detail)

He was an art collector: old masters and contemporary portraits.[18] He presented a copy of a painting by Paolo Veronese, the Martyrdom of St George, to the Fitzwilliam Museum in 1835.[19][20][21]

Works[edit]

In 1803 he edited The Works of Richard Owen Cambridge, with an account of his life and character by his son, George Owen Cambridge. It contained much verse that had not yet been published.[2]

Family[edit]

He married Cornelia Kuyck van Mierop in 1795.[1]

Archdeacon Cambridge's schools[edit]

From 1842 there have been "Archdeacon Cambridge's schools" in Twickenham, named as a memorial. They were designed by George Basevi.[22]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sarah Harriet Burney; Lorna J. Clark (1997). The Letters of Sarah Harriet Burney. University of Georgia Press. p. 135 note 24. ISBN 978-0-8203-1746-5. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Sambrook, James. "Cambridge, Richard Owen". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4430.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  3. ^ a b George Edward Cokayne, The club of "Nobody's Friends," since its foundation on 21 June 1800, to 1885 Volum 1 (1920), p. 46; archive.org.
  4. ^ Sylvanus Urban, Gent. (1841). The Gentleman's Magazine. p. 214. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  5. ^ Baines, Paul. "Pepys, Sir William Weller". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/47079.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. ^ Claire Harman (12 October 2001). Fanny Burney: A Biography. HarperCollins Canada, Limited. pp. 179–80. ISBN 978-0-00-655036-5. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  7. ^ A history of Myland Church: Rectors of the Parish of Myland, Essex from the year 1351.
  8. ^ Peter B. Nockles (12 December 1996). The Oxford Movement in Context: Anglican High Churchmanship, 1760-1857. Cambridge University Press. p. 16 note 58. ISBN 978-0-521-58719-8. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  9. ^ Joyce M. Horn (1992). "Canons: Second prebend". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1541-1857: volume 7: Ely, Norwich, Westminster and Worcester dioceses. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  10. ^ Edward Churton, Memoir of Joshua Watson (1863), p. 42; archive.org.
  11. ^ Joyce M. Horn (1969). "Archdeacons: Middlesex". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1541-1857: volume 1: St. Paul's, London. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  12. ^ Susan Reynolds (Editor) (1962). "Twickenham: Churches". A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 3: Shepperton, Staines, Stanwell, Sunbury, Teddington, Heston and Isleworth, Twickenham, Cowley, Cranford, West Drayton, Greenford, Hanwell, Harefield and Harlington. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  13. ^ Twickenham Museum, Richard Owen Cambridge.
  14. ^ R. A. Soloway (1969). Prelates and People: Ecclesiastical Social Thought in England, 1783-1852. Routledge & Kegan Paul. p. 289. ISBN 978-0-7100-6331-1. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  15. ^ David A. Dowland (1997). Nineteenth-Century Anglican Theological Training: The Redbrick Challenge. Oxford University Press. p. 43. ISBN 978-0-19-826929-8. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  16. ^ Twickenham Museum, Cambridge Park & Meadowbank.
  17. ^ londongardensonline.org.uk, Cambridge Gardens, Richmond.
  18. ^ Samuel Leigh (publisher.) (1818). Leigh's New Picture of London; or, A view of the ... British metropolis. p. 416. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  19. ^ fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk, The Martyrdom of St George.
  20. ^ Sidney Colvin, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Pictures in the Fitzwilliam Museum (1902), pp. 34–5; archive.org.
  21. ^ Charles Henry Cooper (22 March 2012). Memorials of Cambridge. Cambridge University Press. p. 98. ISBN 978-1-108-04396-0. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  22. ^ Susan Reynolds (Editor) (1962). "Twickenham: Schools". A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 3: Shepperton, Staines, Stanwell, Sunbury, Teddington, Heston and Isleworth, Twickenham, Cowley, Cranford, West Drayton, Greenford, Hanwell, Harefield and Harlington. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 

External links[edit]