George R. Vincent

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George R. Vincent (August 29, 1841 - September 18, 1910) was an American physician from Tomah, Wisconsin who spent one term as a Greenbacker member of the Wisconsin State Assembly from Monroe County.[1]

Background[edit]

Vincent was born on August 29, 1841 in the Town of Norway, in Herkimer County, New York. He received an academic education, graduating from the University of Vermont College of Medicine and becoming a physician. He moved to Wisconsin in 1866, and settled at Tomah in Monroe County.

Public office[edit]

He was a member of the village board of Tomah for several years, and president of the village in 1872. In 1876, he ran as an Independent candidate for the second Monroe County district of the Assembly (the Towns of Adrian, Byron, Clifton, Glendale, Greenfield, La Grange, Lincoln, Sheldon, the Town of Tomah, Wellington, Oakdale and Wilton), but lost to Republican Harry Doxtader, who polled 1036 votes to 338 for Vincent and 994 for Democrat Samuel Gunn.[2] In 1878, he ran again as a Greenbacker against incumbent Republican William Y. Baker, and was successful, with 1069 votes to Baker's 787. He was assigned to the standing committees on assessment and collection of taxes, and on medical societies.[3]

He did not run for re-election in 1879, and was succeeded by Robert Campbell, a Republican.

Professional and personal life[edit]

When the Monroe County Medical Society was organized in 1903, he was elected its first President.[4]

Vincent was married twice. In 1866, just before coming to Tomah, he was married at Stratford, New York to Elizabeth Kibbe; she died in Tomah in 1889, and two years later he married Mary Tyler of Binghamton, New York (he continued to return to his native New York for visits[5][6]). He died September 18, 1910.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cannon, A. Peter, ed. Members of the Wisconsin Legislature: 1848 – 1999. State of Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau Informational Bulletin 99-1, September 1999; p. 117
  2. ^ Bashford, R. M., ed. The Legislative Manual of the State of Wisconsin: Comprising the Constitutions of the United States and of the State of Wisconsin, Jefferson's Manual, Forms and Laws for the Regulation of Business; also, lists and tables for reference, etc. Sixteenth Annual Edition. Madison: E. B. Bolens, State Printer, 1877; p. 469
  3. ^ Warner, Hans B., ed. The Blue Book of the State of Wisconsin, for 1879. Containing the Constitutions of the United States and of the State; Jefferson's Manual; Rules and Orders of the Senate and Assembly, and Annals of the Legislature; also, statistical tables and history of state institutions Eighteenth Annual Edition. Madison: David Atwood, State Printer, 1879; pp. 500, 514, 517-518
  4. ^ "Society Proceedings: Monroe County Medical Society" Wisconsin Medical Journal Madison: State Medical Society of Wisconsin. Vol. 2, #6 (November 1903); p. 397
  5. ^ "Matters of General and Local Interest: Prospect" Rome Semi-Weekly Citizen August 4, 1894; p. 8, col. 4
  6. ^ "Vicinity Counties: News from Northern and Central New York: Oneida County Towns:Prospect" Utica Semi-Weekly Herald June 18, 1897; p. 5, col. 6
  7. ^ Richards, Randolph A., ed. History of Monroe County, Wisconsin: Past and Present Including an Account of the Cities, Towns and Villages of the County Chicago: C. F. Cooper & Co., 1912; p. 494