George Stone (outfielder)

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Silent George redirects here. For another player with this nickname, see George Hendrick.
George Stone
George Stone baseball card.jpg
Left fielder
Born: (1876-09-03)September 3, 1876
Lost Nation, Iowa
Died: January 3, 1945(1945-01-03) (aged 68)
Clinton, Iowa
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 20, 1903 for the Boston Americans
Last MLB appearance
October 9, 1910 for the St. Louis Browns
Career statistics
Batting average .301
Home runs 23
Runs batted in 268
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • Led the AL in at bats (635), plate appearances (694), hits (189), total bases (261), and runs created (90) in 1905
  • Led the AL in batting average (.358), on-base percentage (.417), slugging percentage (.501), OPS (.918), total bases (291), runs created (120), and times on base (267) in 1906
  • Led the AL in times on base (256) in 1907
  • Led the AL in singles (131) in 1908
  • Shares Orioles single-season record for triples (20 in 1906)

George Robert Stone, nicknamed Silent George, (September 3, 1876 – January 3, 1945) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox (1903) and St. Louis Browns (1905–10). Stone batted and threw left-handed. He was the 1906 American League batting champion.

Baseball career[edit]

Stone was Jewish.[1] He left his career in banking at the age of 26 to join the Omaha team of the Western League.

In December 1904 he was traded by the Boston Americans with cash to the St. Louis Browns for Jesse Burkett.

In a seven-season career, Stone posted a .301 batting average with 23 home runs and 268 RBI in 848 games played.

Stone died in Clinton, Iowa, at the age of 68. The burial was at Coleridge Cemetery, in Coleridge, Nebraska.[2]

In 1970 he was inducted into The Des Moines Register's Iowa Sports Hall of Fame.

In a 1976 Esquire magazine article, sportswriter Harry Stein published an "All Time All-Star Argument Starter," consisting of five ethnic baseball teams. Stone was the right fielder on Stein's Jewish team.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "George Stone". BASEBALL-Reference. Retrieved January 23, 2011. 

External links[edit]