George Summerbee

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George Summerbee
Personal information
Full name George Michael Summerbee
Date of birth (1914-10-22)22 October 1914
Place of birth Winchester, England
Date of death 19 April 1955(1955-04-19) (aged 40)
Place of death Cirencester, England
Playing position Wing half
Youth career
c.1932–1934 Basingstoke Town
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1934–1935 Aldershot 19 (0)
1935–1946 Preston North End 3 (0)
Portsmouth (guest)
1946–1947 Chester 9 (0)
1947–1950 Barrow 122 (0)
1950–1952 Cheltenham Town
Teams managed
1950–1952 Cheltenham Town
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

George Summerbee (22 October 1914 – 19 April 1955) was an English professional footballer who played in The Football League for four clubs. He was father of Mike Summerbee and grandfather of Nicky Summerbee, who both played for Manchester City.

Life[edit]

Summerbee was born in Winchester, England and died in Cirencester, England.

Playing and managerial career[edit]

Summerbee began his professional career with Aldershot, who he joined from non-league side Basingstoke Town in May 1934. While at Aldershot he played alongside his brother Gordon.[1] In January 1935 George joined Football League First Division side Preston North End for £650.[2] In 11 years at Deepdale, Summerbee made just three Football League appearances. During this spell he also spent several years during the Second World War guesting for Portsmouth, where he made 149 competitive appearances while working at a nearby aircraft factory.[3]

He joined Football League Division Three North side Chester in May 1946 for £600,[4] where again he struggled to earn a regular first-team place, and he moved to Barrow. He made more than 100 league appearances in three years at Holker Street, with his final Football League outing being against Lincoln City in May 1950.

Summerbee then joined non-league side Cheltenham Town as player-manager, but he left in 1952 after his contract was not renewed.[5] He died just three years later from Addison’s disease, after a spell scouting for Bristol City.[6]

His life story is featured alongside the other footballing members of his family in "Fathers, Sons and Football" (Colin Shindler, Headline Book Publishing, 2001).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Colin Shindler (2001). Fathers, Sons and Football. pp. 13–16. ISBN 0-7472-3218-0. 
  2. ^ Colin Shindler (2001). Fathers, Sons and Football. p. 18. ISBN 0-7472-3218-0. 
  3. ^ Colin Shindler (2001). Fathers, Sons and Football. pp. 61–65. ISBN 0-7472-3218-0. 
  4. ^ Colin Shindler (2001). Fathers, Sons and Football. p. 81. ISBN 0-7472-3218-0. 
  5. ^ Colin Shindler (2001). Fathers, Sons and Football. pp. 111–112. ISBN 0-7472-3218-0. 
  6. ^ Colin Shindler (2001). Fathers, Sons and Football. pp. 117–123. ISBN 0-7472-3218-0. 

External links[edit]