George Woodcock (trade unionist)

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This article is about the British trade unionist. For the Canadian writer, see George Woodcock. For the English cricketer, see George Woodcock (cricketer).

George Woodcock (c. 1904 — 30 October 1979) was a British trade unionist and general secretary of the Trades Union Congress from 1960 to 1969.

Born and raised in Bamber Bridge, Lancashire, he became, in 1924, an official of the Bamber Bridge and District Weavers' Union. He was also active in the Independent Labour Party and the Labour Party. In 1929 he won a TUC scholarship to Ruskin College, Oxford, in 1929. Having distinguished himself at undergraduate and postgraduate level, and following two years in the civil service, Woodcock joined the TUC in 1936 as head of the research and economic department. Here, Woodcock was much influenced by leading moderates in the trade union movement, such as Walter Citrine and Ernest Bevin, and also by the economic ideas of John Maynard Keynes.

In 1947 he became the TUC's Assistant General Secretary and in 1960, was appointed General Secretary, serving in that position until 1969. In 1970 Woodcock was a candidate for the Chancellorship of the University of Kent at Canterbury, but lost to Jo Grimond.

References[edit]

  • George Goodman, "Woodcock, George, (1904-1979), trade unionist", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Vincent Tewson
Assistant General Secretary of the TUC
1947–1960
Succeeded by
Vic Feather
Preceded by
Vincent Tewson
General Secretary of the TUC
1960–1969
Succeeded by
Vic Feather