Georgia State Route 10

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"GA 10" redirects here. For the congressional district, see Georgia's 10th congressional district.

State Route 10 marker

State Route 10
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length: 172.3 mi[2] (277.3 km)
Existed: 1920 (1920)[1] – present
Major junctions
West end: I‑75 / I‑85 in Downtown Atlanta
  I‑285 near Avondale Estates
I‑520 in Augusta
East end: US 1 / US 25 / US 78 / US 278 / SC 121
SR 121 at the South Carolina state line in Augusta
Location
Counties: Fulton, DeKalb, Gwinnett, Walton, Oconee, Clarke, Oglethorpe, Wilkes, McDuffie, Columbia, Richmond
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
SR 9 SR 11

State Route 10 (SR 10) is a 172.3-mile-long (277.3 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Georgia. It travels from Downtown Atlanta to the South Carolina state line in Augusta. This highway, along with U.S. Route 78 (US 78), connect three of the biggest metro areas together: Atlanta, Athens, and Augusta. It travels concurrently with US 78 from Atlanta to Druid Hills; from near Stone Mountain to near Athens; and from Athens to its eastern terminus, for a total of 149.2 miles (240.1 km), or approximately 86.6 percent of its route.

Route description[edit]

Fulton and DeKalb counties[edit]

US 278/SR 10 in Avondale Estates.

At its western terminus, SR 10 is the eastward extension of Andrew Young International Boulevard NE and Ellis Street NE and has an interchange with I-75/I-85 (Downtown Connector) on the eastern edge of Downtown Atlanta, in Fulton County. At Jackson Street NE, the highway enters Freedom Park and becomes known as Freedom Parkway. A block later, it curves to the northeast and has an incomplete interchange with the southern terminus of SR 42 Connector, which acts like an eastern spur of Freedom Parkway. After that, SR 10 begins to curve to the north and passes to the west of the Jimmy Carter Library and Museum and the Carter Center; then, it curves to the north-northwest and has an intersection with US 29/US 78/US 278/SR 8 (Ponce de Leon Avenue NE). The five highways travel concurrently to the east and exit the park. They pass the Briarcliff Plaza shopping center and intersect North Highland Avenue NE, before meeting US 23/SR 42 (Moreland Avenue NE/Briarcliff Road NE) on the Fulton–DeKalb county line. At this intersection, US 23 joins the concurrency. The six highways pass by Springdale Park, Springdale Park Elementary School, Virgilee Park, The Paideia School, St. John's Lutheran Church, Brightwood Park, Shady Side Park, and the Lullwater Estate, before intersecting Clifton Road on the southeastern corner of the Druid Hills Golf Club. Just past this intersection, the concurrency passes by Dellwood Park, enters Druid Hills, and passes the Fernbank Museum of Natural History. After that, they cross over Lullwater Creek. On the southern edge of Deepdene Park, US 278/SR 10 depart the concurrency to the southeast on East Lake Drive NE. As soon as they enter Decatur, they curve to the south-southeast and travel underneath Howard Avenue and College Avenue. They turn right onto Park Place NE, and follow it to the west and north for about three blocks; then, they turn right onto College Avenue and travel along it to the east-northeast. US 278/SR 10 pass by Renfroe Middle School, Raiders Park, Decatur High School, and Agnes Scott College, before intersecting SR 155 (South Candler Street) and the southern terminus of East Trinity Place. SR 155 joins the concurrency for about three blocks and departs on Commerce Drive. A short distance later, the two highways leave Decatur and pass the Avondale MARTA station; then, they enter Avondale Estates, where they pass Avondale Elementary School. At Mountain Drive, SR 10 departs from US 278 to the northeast. This intersection marks the western terminus of SR 12. The short Mountain Drive segment of SR 10 pass north of the Kinsington MARTA station. At the eastern terminus of Mountain Drive is an intersection with the eastern terminus of SR 154 (Memorial Drive). At this intersection, SR 10 turns left onto Memorial Drive and passes the DeKalb County Sheriff's Headquarters and Jail. About one block later, SR 10 has an interchange with I-285 (Atlanta Bypass). Northeast of Rockbridge Road, the highway passes Georgia Piedmont Technical College, Georgia Perimeter College, Clarkston High School, and James R. Hallford Stadium. It curves to the east and crosses Snapfinger Creek. SR 10 skirts along the northwestern edge of Stone Mountain and has an interchange with East Ponce de Leon Avenue, just before meeting US 78/SR 410 (Stone Mountain Freeway). At this interchange, SR 410 meets its eastern terminus, and US 78/SR 10 travel concurrently. Within the interchange, the roadway curves to the east-northeast. Almost immediately after the interchange, the freeway passes under the Silver Hill Road overpass and begins to skirt along the northwestern edge of Stone Mountain Park. A short distance later, they cross over Stone Mountain Creek, travel just to the north of the Stone Mountain Park Dam–North Dam and Stone Mountain Park Lake–North, and have an interchange with the southern terminus of SR 236 (Hugh Howell Road). Here, the roadway enters Stone Mountain Park proper. The freeway crosses over Little Stone Mountain Creek before the westbound and eastbound lanes diverge from each other. The eastbound lanes curve to the southeast and meet an interchange with the main entrance of Stone Mountain Park. At this interchange, they curve back to the northeast and meet the westbound lanes again, just before leaving the boundary of the park and entering Gwinnett County.[2]

Gwinnett County[edit]

Almost instantly, US 78/SR 10 enter the city limits of Mountain Park. They have an interchange with West Park Place Boulevard and Rockbridge Road. The latter is only listed on westbound signage. The freeway crosses over West Park Place Boulevard on the Forrest L. Adair, II Memorial Bridge and curves to the east-northeast. After this interchange, Stone Mountain Freeway ends and the numbered highways continue to the east-northeast. At an intersection with Camp Circle SW and Pucketts Road SW, the concurrency leaves Mountain Park. After a curve to the northeast, they curve back to the east-northeast and travel south of Lake Lucerne and the Opossum Lake Dam, before crossing over the Yellow River. They intersect the northern terminus of SR 264 (Bethany Church Road) and the southern terminus of Killian Hill Road at the erroneously termed Cpl Jonathan Ryan Akers Memorial Interchange. The concuurency passes Eternal Hills Cemetery; then, they enter Snellville, where they intersect SR 124 (Scenic Highway) at the James D. Mason Memorial Interchange. Here, US 78/SR 10 curve to the east-southeast and pass the Snellville Historical Cemetery. Almost immediately, they travel about one block north of Britt Elementary School. Just past the intersection with Skland Drive SW and Wisteria Drive SW, they pass South Gwinnett High School. Just past the school, the highways curve to the east-northeast. A little over 1,000 feet (300 m) later, they curve to the east-southeast. At an intersection with the southern terminus of SR 84 (Grayson Parkway) and the northern terminus of Rockdale Circle, they curve back to the east-northeast and travel north of Amitriain Lake. At an intersection with Crestview Drive, the two highways leave Snellville proper and skirt along the edge of the city limits for about 700 feet (210 m), where they leave the city altogether. On the northwest corner of Rosebud Park, they curve to the east-southeast. After traveling south of Tuggle Lake, they enter Loganville. In the city, they curve to the south-southeast. Just over 200 feet (61 m) after intersecting Logan Drive, US 78/SR 10 enter Walton County.[2]

Walton County[edit]

In downtown Loganville, the concurrent highways intersect SR 20 (Main Street). They curve to the east-southeast and intersect SR 81 and the northern terminus of Cown Drive. At this intersection, SR 81 joins the concurrency. At Lee Byrd Road's southern terminus, SR 81 splits off to the south-southeast. US 78/SR 10 leave the city limits and cross over Big Flat Creek. They enter the city limits of Between and curve to the southeast. Right after leaving town, they curve to the east-southeast, and, approximately 550 feet (170 m) after intersecting the eastern terminus of Sardis Church Road, they curve to the east-northeast. Then, they curve back to the east-southeast and cross over the Alcovy River. A short distance after the river, US 78/SR 10 bypass the main part of Monroe on a freeway bypass. Their first exit is with the western terminus of SR 10 Business (West Spring Street). The bypass begins to curve to the east-northeast. Approximately 0.7 miles (1.1 km) after that interchange is the eastern terminus of SR 138. Less than 1 mile (1.6 km) after that is an interchange with SR 11 (North Broad Street). The two highways curve back to the east-southeast. Approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) later, they curve to the northeast have an interchange with the eastern terminus of SR 10 Business (East Spring Street), where the freeway bypass ends. Part of the highway is known as the Moina Michael Highway, named for Moina Michael, an American professor and humanitarian who conceived the idea of using poppies as a symbol of remembrance for those who served in World War I. US 78/SR 10 cross over Jacks Creek and intersect the northern terminus of SR 83 (Unisia Drive). Approximately 0.5 miles (0.80 km) after leaving Monroe, they travel through a rural area of the county and cross over the Apalachee River into Oconee County.[2]

Oconee County[edit]

US 78/SR 10 continue to the northeast and intersect SR 53 (Hog Mountain Road). They curve to the east before curving to the north-northeast. They intersect Mars Hill Road (former SR 209) just before an interchange with US 29/SR 8/SR 316 (University Parkway), as well as the western terminus of US 78 Business. At this interchange, SR 10 begins a concurrency with US 78 Business; meanwhile, US 29/US 78/SR 8/SR 316 travel to the east-southeast. The two highways cross over McNutt Creek into Clarke County and the city limits of Athens.[2]

Clarke County[edit]

US 78 Business/SR 10 travel to the southeast of Bogart and turn east along Atlanta Highway. They meet an interchange with SR 10 Loop (Athens Perimeter Highway). and pass Evergreen Memorial Park; then, they curve to the northeast. After passing north of Timothy Road Elementary School, they have an incomplete interchange with the northern terminus of Epps Bridge Parkway. After that, they cross over the Middle Oconee River. Here, Atlanta Highway ends and US 78 Business/SR 10 take on the West Broad Street name. They pass north of St. Mary's Hospital, Clarke Middle School, Classic City High School, and Clarke Central High School. At Milledge Avenue, they intersect SR 15 Alternate. Just over five blocks later, they skirt along the northern edge of the University of Georgia and curve to the southeast, crossing over the North Oconee River. Just over 3,000 feet (910 m) later, the concurrent highways meet US 29/US 78/US 129/US 441/SR 8/SR 10 Loop/SR 15, as well as the unsigned SR 422 (a total of eight highways). At this interchange, US 78 Business ends, and US 78/SR 10 travel to the southeast. They curve to the east-southeast and pass to the south of the Athens Ben Epps Airport. At the intersection of Cherokee Road, they pass southwest of Satterfield Park. They skirt along the northeastern edge of the Southeast Clarke Park before crossing over Shoal Creek. Just prior to crossing over Big Creek, the concurrency begins to curve to the south-southeast. They curve to the east-southeast and then to the southeast before leaving the city limits of Athens and entering Oglethorpe County.[2]

Oglethorpe County[edit]

US 78/SR 10 continue to the southeast, crossing over Moss Creek. After a brief east-northeast section, they travel just south of the city limits of Arnoldsville, in an east-southeast direction. Just before entering Crawford, they cross over Barrow Creek. In town, they curve to the east-northeast, travel to the north of Crawford Cemetery, and curve to the northeast. On the northeastern edge of the city limits, the concurrency begins a gradual curve to the southeast, traveling north of Brooks Lake and the Brooks Lake Dam and southwest of a branch of the Oglethrope County Library. They also pass Oglethorpe County High School. Immediately after entering Lexington, US 78/SR 10 intersect SR 22 (Comer Road), which joins the currency. The three highways travel to the south-southeast to an intersection with SR 77 (Union Point Road), which also joins the concurrency. The four-highway concurrency curves to the southeast and passes the city's magistrate court. Approximately 1,000 feet (300 m) before leaving the city limits, SR 77 departs the concurrency to the north-northeast on Elberton Road. The three highways begin a curve to the east-southeast, and SR 22 departs the concurrency to the south-southeast on Crawfordville Road. US 78/SR 10 cross over Long Creek, before curving to the south-southeast and then to the east-southeast. They cross over Buffalo Creek, curve back to the southeast, and make an easterly jaunt. Southeast of the University of Georgia Farm Lake, the highways cross over Dry Fork Creek into Wilkes County.[2]

Wilkes County[edit]

Just after US 78/SR 10 begin a gradual curve to the southeast, they cross over Beaverdam Creek. They travel south of Rock Cemetery. Just over 1,000 feet (300 m) after intersecting the southern terminus of Centerville Road and the northern terminus of Richardson Road, they begin to travel through Rayle. In the center of town, they curve to the east. Just to the east of town, the highways curve to the east-northeast and curve back to the east-southeast and travel to the south of Washington–Wilkes Orchard Lake and the Washington–Wilkes Orchard Dam. They again curve to the east-northeast and bend to the southeast, passing the Washington–Wilkes County Airport. A little over 1 mile (1.6 km) before entering the city limits of Washington, they intersect the western terminus of US 78 Business/SR 10 Business. In the city, just west of the intersection with the northern terminus of Campbell Street, the mainline routes begin to curve to the east-southeast. They intersect SR 44 (North Mercer Street), which joins the concurrency. The three highways travel with the honorary designation of the Benjamin Wynn Fortson Jr Memorial Highway, named for Benjamin W. Fortson, Jr., a former Secretary of State of Georgia. After crossing Threemile Creek and intersecting South Elijah Clark Drive, they curve to the east-northeast. At the intersection with Carey Street, they begin to curve back to the east-southeast. They intersect SR 17 Business (known locally as Poplar Drive to the south and Tignall Road to the north). Here, SR 44 departs the concurrency to the north. After this intersection, US 78/SR 10 begin to curve to the south-southeast. They curve to the east and intersect SR 17, where the concurrency turns right, and all three highways travel to the south-southeast. The concurrent routes skirt along the eastern city limits of Washington and travel to the west of Booth Lake and the Booth Lake Dam, before very briefly re-entering Washington proper. Just before the intersection with Ann Denard Drive, they begin to skirt the city limits again. On the southeastern edge of the city, they intersect the eastern terminus of US 78 Business/SR 10 Business and the southern terminus of SR 17 Business (all three carry the Robert Toombs Avenue name), as well as the western terminus of US 378 (Lincolnton Road). Both directions also carry SR 47. US 78/SR 10/SR 17 travel to the south-southeast, known as the Sam McGill Memorial Parkway. Almost immediately, they begin to curve to the east-southeast. They intersect the southern terminus of the unsigned SR 47 Connector (Thomson Road) and the eastern terminus of Denard Road. They curve to the south-southeast and travel through rural areas of the county and skirt along the northeastern edge of the Washington–Wilkes Country Club. On the southeastern corner of the golf course, the three highways intersect the northern terminus of SR 80 (Wrightsboro Road). They curve to the east-southeast and back to the southeast. They cross over the Little River into McDuffie County.[2]

McDuffie County[edit]

US 78/SR 10/SR 17 continue to the southeast and cross over Hart Creek and Big Creek. They curve to the south-southeast and intersect the southern terminus of SR 43 (Lincolnton Road). Approximately 500 feet (150 m) later, they pass Pine Grove Cemetery. Just after they intersect Stagecoach Road, they skirt along the eastern edge of Belle Meade Country Club and then the Thomson–McDuffie County Airport. Just before they enter Thomson, they intersect the northern terminus of SR 17 Bypass (Thomson Bypass). At this intersection, US 78/SR 10 turn left and follow the bypass around the eastern side of the city, while SR 17 continues toward the main part of the city. The three highways curve to the south-southeast and cross over, but do not have an interchange with, I-20 (Carl Sanders Highway). The trio travels through the northeastern part of Thomson and intersect SR 150 (Cobbham Road). They leave the unmarked city limits and curve to the east, before coming back to the south-southeast and intersect SR 223 (White Oak Road). The concurrency curves to the south-southwest and crosses over a CSX rail line before intersecting US 278/SR 12 (Augusta Road). At this intersection, SR 12 meets its eastern terminus, and US 78/US 278/SR 10 travel to the southeast as Augusta Highway. SR 17 Bypass travels to the south-southwest, as well. The three highways stair-step their way to the southeast, crossing over Sweetwater Creek and traveling near Boneville. Southwest of Boneville, they cross over Boneville Stream. South of Boneville, they travel southwest of Boneville Pond. Just before the intersection with Wire Road and Ellington Airline Road, they curve to the east-northeast. Just to the west of Old Augusta Road, US 78/US 278/SR 10 curve to the east-southeast. They curve to the southeast and enter Dearing. In town, they curve to the east and intersect School Drive, which leads to Augusta Technical College's Adult Education Center and Dearing Elementary School. The concurrency curves to the northeast and then back to the east-southeast, before they cross over Boggy Gut Creek and enter Columbia County.[2]

Columbia County[edit]

Approximately 600 feet (180 m) after entering the county, US 78/US 278/SR 10 enter the western city limits of Harlem. Just to the southeast of West Boundary Street, they travel about two and a half blocks south of Harlem Middle School. In the main part of town, they intersect US 221/SR 47 (Louisville Street). Ath the southeastern edge of the city limits, the roadway becomes known as Gordon Highway, which is a major urban corridor farther to the east. The highways travel through Campania and Berzelia. A few thousand feet later, they curve to the northeast, crossing into Richmond County (and the city limits of Augusta), and begin paralleling the northern edge of Fort Gordon.[2]

Richmond County[edit]

Kmart store on US 1/US 78/US 278/SR 10 (Gordon Highway)

US 78/US 278/SR 10 serve as the access point for Gordon Park Speedway and Augusta State Medical Prison. A short distance later is Fort Gordon's Gate 3, a commercial vehicle gate for the Army base and Gate 2, a variable-hour gate. At the intersection for Gate 2, the highway also intersects the eastern terminus of SR 223 (East Robinson Avenue). Approximately 3.4 miles (5.5 km) later is an intersection with the southern terminus of SR 383 (Jimmy Dyess Parkway) and the northern terminus of an access road to Fort Gordon's Gate 1, the 24-hour main gate for the base. About halfway between here and the interchange with I-520 (Bobby Jones Expressway), the three highwasys leave the edge of Fort Gordon and begin to transition into an urban corridor. After the interstate, the roadway enters the main part of Augusta, passing south of Aquinas High School, and curves to the south-southeast, past the location of the now-closed Regency Mall. Immediately after a slight curve to the east is an intersection with US 1/SR 4 (Deans Bridge Road). US 1 joins the concurrency, while SR 4 continues to the northeast into downtown. The four-highway concurrency curves slightly to the east-southeast to an interchange with US 25/SR 121 (Peach Orchard Road), which both join the concurrency. The six highways travel to the east-northeast and intersect the northern terminus of SR 56 Spur (Doug Barnard Parkway) and the southern terminus of Molly Pond Road. The highways curve to the north-northeast and intersect Laney–Walker Boulevard, thus effectively entering downtown. They pass just to the northwest of Magnolia Cemetery, Cedar Grove Cemetery, and May Park and southeast of James Brown Arena. A short distance later, they pass to the east of Old Medical College and the Old Government House, then they have an interchange with US 25 Business/SR 28 (Broad Street). Here, US 25 Business meets its southern terminus. Just after this interchange, the highways cross over the Savannah River into South Carolina. At the state line, SR 10/SR 121 end, while US 1/US 25/US 78/US 278, concurrent with SC 121 curve to the northeast toward North Augusta.[2]

National Highway System[edit]

The following sections of SR 10 are included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility:

  • From its western terminus to the Gwinnett–Walton county line[3][4]
  • From the Oconee–Clarke county line to the northern terminus of the Thomson Bypass[4][5]
  • The entire portion within Richmond County[6]

History[edit]

1920s[edit]

The roadway that would eventually be signed as SR 10 was established at least as far back as 1920 as part of SR 8 from downtown Atlanta to Decatur; SR 45 from Loganville to Monroe;; SR 8 from near Bogart to Athens; SR 10 from Athens to Washington; SR 17 from Washington to Thomson; and SR 12 from Thomson to Augusta. Also, SR 24 was established in Augusta, concurrent with SR 12.[1] By the end of 1921, SR 45 was extended from Loganville west-southwest to Decatur and northeast from Monroe to the Bogart area.[1][7] By the end of 1926, US 29 was designated along the portion of SR 8 between downtown Atlanta and Decatur; this portion was also paved. SR 45 between Decatur and Loganville was redesignated as part of US 78/SR 10, with the portion from Decatur to just north of Stone Mountain being paved. SR 45 between Loganville and Monroe was redesignated as part of SR 13 (and presumably US 78); SR 45 between Monroe and the Bogart area was redesignated as US 78/SR 10. US 29 (and presumably US 78/SR 10) were designated along the portion of SR 8 between the Bogart area and Athens; this portion was paved. US 78 was designated along SR 10 from Athens to Washington, SR 17 from Washington to Thomson, and SR 12 from Thomson to Augusta. A short segment of US 78/SR 10 was paved. A short segment of US 78/SR 10 northwest of Washington and a short segment of US 78/SR 17 southeast of Washington were paved. The entire concurrency of SR 12/SR 24 in Augusta was paved. Also, US 1 was designated along SR 24 and was made concurrent with US 78/SR 12 in Augusta.[7][8] Prior to the beginning of 1932, the entire segment of SR 13 from Loganville to Monroe was paved. Nearly half of US 78/SR 10 between Athens and Lexington was paved. SR 10 was extended along US 78/SR 17 from Washington to Thomson and US 78/SR 12 from Thomson to Augusta. The entirety of US 78/SR 10/SR 12 (and US 1/SR 24) from Thomson to Augusta was paved.[8][9]

1930s to 1960s[edit]

In January 1932, SR 13 was redesignated as part of SR 20. Also, SR 24 was redesignated as SR 4.[9][10] By May of the next year, all of US 78/SR 10 between Lexington and Washington was paved.[11][12] In February 1934, all of US 78/SR 78/SR 10 between Athens and Lexington was paved.[13][14] Near the end of the year, all of SR 20 between Loganville and Monroe was redesignated as part of SR 10 (and presumably US 78).[15][16] By April 1937, all of US 78/SR 10 from downtown Atlanta to Snellville was paved.[17][18] In August 1938, all of US 78/SR 10 from downtown Atlanta to the Walton–Oconee county line was paved.[19][20] By July of the next year, the entire length of SR 10 at the time was paved.[20][21] At the end of 1941, SR 42A was designated along Ponce de Leon Avenue in Atlanta.[22][23] By the end of 1946, it was decommissioned.[24][25] By the middle of 1960, US 278 was designated along US 78/SR 10 from downtown Atlanta to Decatur, and along US 78/SR 10/SR 12 from Harlem (or possibly Thomson) to Augusta.[26][27] By 1966, I-485 was proposed from I-75/I-85 (Downtown Connector) to Boulevard. In Athens, US 29/US 78/SR 8/SR 10 traveled into the main part of town, with US 29 splitting off onto US 129/US 441 Temporary/SR 15 (Milledge Avenue; now SR 15 Alternate). SR 8 departed the concurrency on Pulaski Street. SR 15 Alternate traveled concurrent with US 78/SR 10 from South Hull Street to Thomas Street.[28][29] Later that year, the I-485 proposal was extended east and north to end at I-85, along with an early proposed route for SR 410, with SR 400 being proposed to be routed both north and south of this extension. In Athens, US 29/SR 8 were designated along the northern part of the Athens Perimeter Highway, with US 78/SR 8 Bus./SR 10 traveling through the city. In the Monroe area, US 78/SR 10 were rerouted north of the main part of town. The former route became SR 10 Business.[29][30] The next year, the north–south portion of the proposed I-485 no longer had SR 410 as a hidden concurrent route; SR 400's proposed routing was extended along this entire proposal. SR 410 was proposed to travel from the eastern end of the east–west segment of I-485 to where US 29/SR 8 split from US 78/US 278/SR 10 in Druid Hills. Also, it was proposed along its current routing.[30][31] In 1969, a northern bypass of Washington was built, designated as SR 10 Bypass, while US 78/SR 10 continued to travel through the main part of town.[32][33]

1970s to 1990s[edit]

In 1970, US 78/SR 10 were routed along SR 10 Loop in the northern part of Washington, with the former routing becoming US 78 Bus. (and presumably SR 10 Bus.).[33][34] By 1975, the I-485 proposal was removed from SR 410 and SR 400.[35][36] In 1976, the proposal for SR 400 south of I-85 and the western segment for SR 410 were dropped, with only a short freeway from I-75/I-85 to Boulevard left on the books.[37][38] On the 1980-1981 GDOT map, it was revealed that this short freeway was designated as a western segment of SR 410.[39][40] In 1980, SR 12 was truncated to end in Thomson, no longer concurrent with US 78/US 278/SR 10 from there to Augusta.[41][42] In 1986, SR 10 Loop was decommissioned.[43][44] In 1988, US 78 was routed along the Athens Perimeter Highway, but entering from the Atlanta Highway exit; the roadway inside the Perimeter was redesignated as US 78 Business, with SR 10 still designated along this stretch of highway.[45][46] In 1991, SR 410's western segment was redesignated as part of SR 10, with a proposal to extend the freeway northeast to US 23/SR 42.[47][48] In 1993, SR 10's eastward extension in Atlanta was completed to Ponce de Leon Avenue.[49][50] Between 1994 and 1996, the portion of US 78 between the Bogart area and the northwest of Athens was redesignated as a westward extension of US 78 Business, with SR 10 still along this segment.[50][51]

Miscellaneous notes[edit]

The Freedom Parkway portion of SR 10 uses the right-of-way of a canceled inner-city Interstate highway project, I-485, which would have traveled eastward (and in a later routing, northward) from downtown Atlanta to an interchange with I-85. The original I-485 interchange with I-75/I-85 in downtown Atlanta is now used for access to Freedom Parkway, though the reduced number of lanes (compared to what was originally planned) makes the interchange look somewhat over-sized for its current purpose. The eastern portion of I-485 was completed as the Stone Mountain Freeway, which also carries SR 10 (and also US 78/SR 410) out to the Stone Mountain.

The land that Freedom Parkway uses around the Carter Center, as well as the land the Carter Center sits on, was originally slated to be used for the I-485 interchange with I-475 (now known as SR 400 further north and I-675 further south), had those roadways been completed through the city of Atlanta proper. Community opposition ended plans for roadway construction in the 1970s when Jimmy Carter was governor of Georgia, but only after hundreds of homes has already been taken by eminent domain and demolished.

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile[2] km Destinations Notes
Fulton Atlanta 0.0 0.0 I‑75 / I‑85 (Downtown Connector/SR 401/SR 403) – Macon, Montgomery, Chattanooga, Greenville Western terminus; roadway continues as Andrew Young International Boulevard and Ellis Street; I-75/I-85, exit 248C.
1.0 1.6 SR 42 Conn. north (Freedom Parkway) – Carter Center Southern terminus of SR 42 Connector
1.8 2.9 US 29 south / US 78 west / US 278 west / SR 8 west (Ponce de Leon Avenue N.E.) Western end of US 29/US 78/US 278/SR&nsbp;8 concurrency
FultonDeKalb
county line
2.4 3.9 US 23 south (Moreland Avenue N.E.) / SR 42 (Briarcliff Road N.E.) Western end of US 23 concurrency
DeKalb Druid Hills 4.1 6.6 US 23 north / US 29 north / US 78 east / SR 8 east (Ponce de Leon Avenue N.E.) Eastern end of US 23/US 29/US 78/SR 8 concurrency
Decatur 6.4 10.3 SR 155 south (South Candler Street) Western end of SR 155 concurrency; southern terminus of East Trinity Place
6.7 10.8 SR 155 north (Commerce Drive) Eastern end of SR 155 concurrency
Avondale Estates 8.6 13.8 US 278 east / SR 12 east (Covington Highway) – Lithonia Eastern end of US 278 concurrency; western terminus of SR 12
  9.2 14.8 SR 154 west (Memorial Drive) – Atlanta Eastern terminus of SR 154
  9.5 15.3 I‑285 (Atlanta Bypass/SR 407) I-285, exit 41
  14.4 23.2 East Ponce de Leon Avenue – Stone Mountain Village, Clarkston Interchange
  15.2 24.5 US 78 west / SR 410 west (Stone Mountain Freeway) – Decatur, Atlanta Western end of US 78 concurrency; eastern terminus of SR 410; Stone Mountain Freeway, exit 5
Stone Mountain Park 16.1 25.9 SR 236 north (Hugh Howell Road) – Tucker Southern terminus of SR 236; Stone Mountain Freeway, exit 7
16.9 27.2 Stone Mountain Park main entrance Stone Mountain Freeway, exit 8
17.4 28.0 West Park Place Boulevard/Rockbridge Road Eastern terminus of the Stone Mountain Freeway; Stone Mountain Freeway, exit 9
Gwinnett   21.0 33.8 SR 264 south (Bethany Church Road) – Centerville Northern terminus of SR 264; southern terminus of Killian Hill Road S.W.; Cpl Jonathan Ryan Ayers Interchange
Snellville 24.2 38.9 SR 124 (Scenic Highway) – Lithonia, Lawrenceville James D. Mason Memorial Intersection
25.7 41.4 SR 84 north (Grayson Parkway) Southern terminus of SR 84; northern terminus of Rockdale Circle
Walton Loganville 31.6 50.9 SR 20 – Lawrenceville, Conyers
32.4 52.1 SR 81 north (Lawrenceville Road) – Winder Western end of SR 81 concurrency; northern terminus of Cown Drive
32.7 52.6 SR 81 south – Covington Eastern end of SR 81 concurrency
  40.9 65.8 SR 10 Bus. east (West Spring Street) Interchange; eastern exit and western entrance; western terminus of SR 10 Business
Monroe 41.6 66.9 SR 138 south (Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard) – Conyers Interchange; northern terminus of SR 138
42.4 68.2 SR 11 (North Broad Street) – Winder Interchange
44.4 71.5 SR 10 Bus. west (East Spring Street) Interchange; western exit and eastern entrance; eastern terminus of SR 10 Business
45.3 72.9 SR 83 south (Unisia Drive) – Madison Northern terminus of SR 83
Oconee   53.9 86.7 SR 53 (Hog Mountain Road) – Watkinsville, Winder
  58.0 93.3
US 29 / US 78 east / US 78 Bus. east / SR 8 / SR 316
Eastern end of US 78 concurrency; western end of US 78 Business concurrency
Clarke Athens 61.6 99.1 SR 10 Loop (SR 422/Athens Perimeter Highway) – Watkinsville, [[University of Georgia, Georgia|University of Georgia]], Hartwell, Elberton Interchange
63.3 101.9 Epps Bridge Parkway to SR 316 west – Atlanta Interchange;northern terminus of Epps Bridge Parkway
66.1 106.4 SR 15 Alt. (Milledge Avenue) – Watkinsville, Jefferson
68.2 109.8
US 29 / US 78 west / US 78 Bus. west / US 129 / US 441 / SR 8 / SR 10 Loop / SR 15 (SR 422/Athens Perimeter Highway)
Eastern end of US 78 Business concurrency; western end of US 78 concurrency
Oglethorpe Lexington 84.0 135.2 SR 22 east (Comer Road) – Comer Western end of SR 22 concurrency
84.3 135.7 SR 77 south (Union Point Road) – Union Point, Siloam Western end of SR 77 concurrency
84.9 136.6 SR 77 north – Elberton, Hartwell Eastern end of SR 77 concurrency
  86.0 138.4 SR 22 west (Crawfordville Road) – Crawfordville Eastern end of SR 22 concurrency
Wilkes   106.7 171.7
US 78 Bus. east / SR 10 Bus. east – Washington
Western terminus of US 78 Business/SR 10 Business
Washington 108.9 175.3 SR 44 south (North Mercer Street) – Greensboro Western end of SR 44 concurrency
109.7 176.5 SR 17 Bus. (Poplar Drive) / SR 44 north (Tignall Drive) – Tignall Eastern end of SR 44 concurrency
110.3 177.5 SR 17 north – Elberton Western end of SR 17 concurrency
112.1 180.4
US 78 Bus. west / SR 10 Bus. west / SR 17 Bus. north (Robert Toombs Avenue) / US 378 east / SR 47 (Lincolnton Road)
Eastern terminus of US 78 Business/SR 10 Business; southern terminus of SR 17 Business; western terminus of US 378
  112.4 180.9 SR 47 Conn. north (Thomson Road) Southern terminus of SR 47 Connector; northern terminus of Denard Road
  114.6 184.4 SR 80 south (Wrightsboro Road) to I‑20 – Warrenton Northern terminus of SR 80
McDuffie   130.1 209.4 SR 43 north (Lincolnton Road) – Lincolnton Southern terminus of SR 43
  132.0 212.4 SR 17 (Washington Road) / SR 17 Byp. to I‑20 Eastern end of SR 17 concurrency; northern terminus of SR 17 Bypass; western end of SR 17 Bypass concurrency
Thomson 134.8 216.9 SR 150 (Cobbham Road) – Clarks Hill, SC
  136.2 219.2 SR 223 (White Oak Road) – Appling, Grovetown
  137.6 221.4 US 278 west / SR 12 west (Augusta Road) / SR 17 Byp. south (Thomson Bypass) – Thomson, Harlem Eastern end of SR 17 Bypass concurrency; western end of US 278 concurrency; eastern terminus of SR 12
Columbia Harlem 148.7 239.3 US 221 / SR 47 (Louisville Street)
Richmond Augusta 157.5 253.5 SR 223 (East Robinson Avenue) – Grovetown, Fort Gordon's Gate 2 Eastern terminus of SR 223
160.9 258.9 SR 383 north (Jimmie Dyess Parkway) Southern terminus of SR 383
163.4 263.0 I‑520 (Bobby Jones Expressway/SR 415) to I‑20 – Columbia, Atlanta, Bush Field I-520, exit 3
167.0 268.8 US 1 south / SR 4 (Deans Bridge Road) – Wrens, Louisville Western end of US 1 concurrency
168.2 270.7 US 25 south / SR 121 south (Peach Orchard Road) – Waynesboro Western end of US 25/SR 121 concurrency
169.5 272.8 SR 56 Spur south (Doug Barnard Parkway) – Bush Field Northern terminus of SR 56 Spur; eastern terminus of Molly Pond Road
172.1 277.0
US 25 Bus. north / SR 28 (Broad Street) – Downtown
Interchange;southern terminus of US 25 Business
Savannah River at the South Carolina state line 172.3 277.3 Eastern terminus of SR 10/SR 121; southern terminus of SC 121; eastern end of US 1/US 25/US 78/US 278/SR 121 concurrency; US 1/US 25/US 78/US 278/SC 121 continue toward North Augusta.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Bannered routes[edit]

Monroe business loop[edit]

Spring Street
Location: Monroe
Length: 4.0 mi[52] (6.4 km)
Existed: 1966 (1966)[29][30]–present

State Route 10 Business (SR 10 Bus.) is a 4.0-mile-long (6.4 km) business route of SR 10 that exists almost entirely within the central city limits of Monroe, in Walton County. It is known as Spring Street for its entire length.

It begins just northwest of the main part of Monroe, at an incomplete interchange with US 78/SR 10. The highway travels southeast and has an intersection with SR 138 (Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard). It curves to the east-northeast and crosses over Mountain Creek. In the main part of town, it intersects SR 11 (Broad Street). The business route passes south of Rest Haven Cemetery and curves to the northeast to meet its eastern terminus, another incomplete interchange with US 78/SR 10.[52]

SR 10 Bus. is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[4]

SR 10 Bus. was designated in 1966 when US 78/SR 10 were rerouted north of the main part of town. The former route became SR 10 Business.[29][30]

The entire route is in Walton County.

Location Mile[52] km Destinations Notes
  0.0 0.0 US 78 west / SR 10 west Western terminus; no access from SR 10 Bus. to US 78/SR 10 east or from US 78/SR 10 west to SR 10 Bus.
Monroe 0.8 1.3 SR 138 (Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard) – Walnut Grove
2.6 4.2 SR 11 (Broad Street) – Social Circle No turn allowed from SR 10 Business to SR 11 north
4.0 6.4 US 78 east / SR 10 east Eastern terminus; no access from SR 10 Bus. to US 78/SR 10 west or from US 78/SR 10 east to SR 10 Bus.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Athens loop[edit]

Athens Perimeter Highway
Location: Athens
Length: 19.1 mi[53] (30.7 km)
Map of SR 10 Loop

State Route 10 Loop (SR 10 Loop, also known as Loop 10, Paul Broun Parkway, or the Athens Perimeter Highway) is a 19.1-mile-long (30.7 km) state highway in the form of a beltway around Athens in the U.S. state of Georgia. Except for a single at-grade intersection, it is built to freeway standards.[citation needed] Much of the road is concurrent with other routes (such as U.S. Route 29 (US 29), US 78, US 129, US 441, SR 8, and SR 15) that pass through the Athens area. It also carries the unsigned SR 422 designation. Only US 78 Business/SR 10 and SR 15 Alternate pass through downtown Athens. Inner/outer directions are often used to sign the loop.

SR 10 Loop begins[clarification needed] at an interchange with US 29/US 78/SR 8/SR 316 to the south, and Epps Bridge Parkway to the north in Oconee County south of Athens. It travels to the east as a four-lane freeway, concurrent with US 29/US 78/SR 8, and crosses McNutt Creek to enter Clarke County and Athens as it meets a partial cloverleaf interchange with US 129/US 441/SR 15, which includes a connection to Timothy Road to the north. Those three routes join SR 10 Loop as it continues east and crosses the Middle Oconee River. The freeway then curves to the northeast and intersects Milledge Avenue, where SR 15 Alternate begins, traveling north from the interchange.[54]

After this intersection, SR 10 Loop crosses a Georgia shortline railroad[55] and turns to the northeast, where it meets College Station Road at a diamond interchange. At this point the highway right-of-way abuts the University of Georgia campus; immediately north of the College Station Road interchange is an on-ramp from a campus parking lot that is normally closed, but is used on Georgia Bulldogs football home game days to allow departing spectators access onto the inner lanes of SR 10 Loop directly from the campus. Northeast of here, the highway crosses the North Oconee River and meets a folded diamond interchange with the SR 10 mainline, which is Oconee Street west of the interchange and Lexington Road east of it. At this interchange, US 78 splits from the highway and turns east, and US 78 Business begins and travels to the west toward the center of the city.[54]

North of this interchange, SR 10 Loop curves to the northwest and meets an at-grade intersection with Peter Street and Olympic Drive, then crosses Trail Creek. As of December 2013, construction is ongoing to upgrade the intersection to a grade-separated interchange. North of here, the highway crosses a CSX railroad,[55] then meets an interchange with Old Hull Road. This interchange does not provide complete access between the two roads; there is only an exit traveling northbound and only an entrance from Old Hull Road traveling southbound. Just north of here, the highway meets an interchange at which US 29/SR 8 continue north while US 129/US 441/SR 10 Loop/SR 15 exit and turn due west. This interchange also completes access to Old Hull Road by providing the movements missing from the aforementioned interchange: an exit from the inner loop and an entrance to the outer loop.[54]

West of this interchange, the freeway passes over the western fork of Trail Creek, then meets a partial cloverleaf interchange with North Avenue and Danielsville Road. Farther west, it intersects Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Parkway and Commerce Road at a diamond interchange. Here, US 441/SR 15 leave the freeway and turn north along Commerce Road. SR 10 Loop then curves in a southwesterly direction and crosses the North Oconee River again before coming to another diamond interchange, this one with Chase Street.[54]

SR 10 Loop continues southwest and crosses the CSX railroad again,[55] then dips to the north and intersects Prince Avenue and Jefferson Road. At this interchange, US 129/SR 15 leave SR 10 Loop and turn north. The freeway's next exit to the southwest is a diamond interchange with Tallassee Road and Oglethorpe Avenue. Farther southwest, SR 10 Loop crosses the Middle Oconee River again, then intersects US 78 Business/SR 10 at a partial cloverleaf interchange with Atlanta Highway.[54]

Then, SR 10 Loop curves back to the southeast, crosses McNutt Creek again, leaving Athens and crossing back into Oconee County. The freeway has one final exit, with Oconee Connector, access to which is incomplete; the outer loop has only an exit, and the inner loop has only an entrance. Finally, the highway curves back to the east and meets the interchange with US 29/US 78/SR 8/SR 316, where the exit numbers reset and the loop begins again.[54]

All of SR 10 Loop is included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[5]

Various sections of the route were constructed and opened before other sections. The first section to open was the northern part, between US 129/Prince Avenue and Old Hull Road, although US 29 north of SR 10 Loop had not been built at that time. The next section was an extension of the first section, westward to Atlanta Highway, which was US 29/US 78 at the time (it is now US 78 Business). This was followed by the eastern part of the route, from US 29 to Milledge Avenue (US 29 north of SR 10 Loop opened at the same time). The final part of the route to be constructed was the southern section from Milledge Avenue to Atlanta Highway.[citation needed]

New exit numbers were assigned on August 2, 2004.[56]

In 2005, new Georgia Department of Transportation maps indicated that SR 422 had been commissioned to cover the same route as SR 10 Loop.[citation needed]

Exits are numbered in a counterclockwise direction.

County Location # Destinations Notes
Old
Oconee 1 1 US 29 south / US 78 west / SR 8 west / SR 316 west – Monroe, Atlanta Clockwise end of US 29/US 78/SR 8 overlap
Clarke Athens 17 4 US 129 south / US 441 south / SR 15 south / Timothy Road – Watkinsville, Madison Clockwise end of US 129/US 441/SR 15 overlap; signed as exits 4A (US 129/US 441/SR 15 south) and 4B (Timothy Road) on inner loop
15 6 SR 15 Alternate north (Milledge Avenue) Exit to reach State Botanical Garden of Georgia
14 7 College Station Road – University of Georgia
13 8
US 78 east / US 78 Bus. west / SR 10 (Oconee Street, Lexington Road)
Counterclockwise end of US 78 overlap; exit to reach Downtown Athens, Lexington, Washington, Athens-Ben Epps Airport
Peter Street, Olympic Drive At-grade intersection
11A 10A Old Hull Road Counterclockwise exit and clockwise entrance.
10B US 129 north / US 441 north / SR 10 Loop outer – Commerce, Jefferson (also unsigned SR 15 North) Counterclockwise exit. Counterclockwise end of US 29/SR 8 overlap. At the interchange with US 29 North, motorists must take this exit to remain on SR 10 loop. The thru route becomes US 29 North to Danielsville, Hartwell, to SR 72 to Elberton.
10C US 129 south / US 441 south / SR 10 Loop inner – Watkinsville, Lexington [via US 78] (also unsigned US 29 South, SR 8 West, and SR 15 South) Clockwise exit. At the interchange with US 29 North, motorists must take this exit to remain on SR 10 loop. The thru route is a spur from the interchange that ends at an intersection with Old Hull Road.
11 10D US 29 north (SR 8 east) – Hartwell, Danielsville, Elberton Clockwise exit and counterclockwise entrance.
10 11 North Avenue, Danielsville Road Signed as exits 11A (Danielsville Road) and 11B (North Avenue) on inner loop, exit 11B to reach Downtown Athens
9 12 US 441 north / SR 15 north – Commerce Counterclockwise end of US 441/SR 15 overlap
8 13 Chase Street
7 14 US 129 north / SR 15 Alternate / Prince Avenue – Jefferson Hugh Logan Interchange, Counterclockwise end of US 129 overlap, exit to reach University of Georgia Health Sciences Campus
6 15 Tallassee Road, Oglethorpe Avenue
3 18
US 78 Bus. / SR 10 (Atlanta Highway) – Monroe
Georgia Square Mall
Oconee   - 20 Oconee Connector Counterclockwise exit and clockwise entrance
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Washington business loop[edit]

State Route 10 Business
Location: Washington
Length: 4.6 mi[57] (7.4 km)
Existed: 1970[33][34]–present

State Route 10 Business (SR 10 Bus.) is a 4.6-mile-long (7.4 km) business route of SR 10 that exists almost entirely within the central city limits of Washington, in Wilkes County. It is known as Lexington Avenue and Robert Toombs Avenue. It is concurrent with US 78 Business for its entire length.

It begins northwest of Washington, at an intersection with US 78/SR 10. The highway travels southeast and curves to the east-southeast, before entering Washington's city limits. It has an intersection with SR 44 (North Mercer Street). It curves to the east-southeast onto Robert Toombs Avenue and intersects SR 47 (Spring Street), near the Mary Willis Library, which joins the concurrency. A few blocks later, after passing the Robert Toombs House and the Washington-Wilkes Historical Museum is an intersection with SR 17 Business (Poplar Drive), which also joins the concurrency. At this intersection, the four-highway concurrency curves to the southeast and meets its eastern terminus, an intersection with US 78/SR 10, as well as the western terminus of US 378. US 78 Bus./SR 17 Bus. end, and SR 47 continues to the east, concurrent with US 378.[57]

SR 10 Bus. is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[4]

In 1970, US 78/SR 10 were routed along SR 10 Loop in the northern part of Washington, with the former routing becoming US 78 Bus. (and presumably SR 10 Bus.).[33][34] In 1986, SR 10 Loop was decommissioned.[43][44]

The entire route is in Wilkes County.

Location Mile[52] km Destinations Notes
  0.0 0.0 US 78 / SR 10 Western terminus of US 78 Bus./SR 10 Bus.; western end of US 78 Bus./SR 10 Bus. concurrency
Washington 2.5 4.0 SR 44 (North Mercer Street) – Union Point
3.0 4.8 SR 47 (Spring Street) – Crawfordville Western end of SR 47 concurrency
3.4 5.5 SR 17 Bus. north (Poplar Drive) – Danburg, Chennault Western end of SR 17 Bus. concurrency
4.6 7.4
US 78 Bus. west / SR 17 Bus. west / US 378 east / SR 47 east (Lincolnton Road) / US 78 / SR 10 / SR 17
Eastern terminus of US 78 Bus./SR 10 Bus.; southern terminus of SR 17 Bus.; western terminus of US 378; eastern end of US 78 Bus., SR 17 Bus., and SR&nsbp;47 concurrencies
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Washington loop[edit]

State Route 10 Loop
Location: Washington
Existed: 1970 (1970)[33][34]–1986[43][44]

State Route 10 Loop (SR 10 Loop) was a loop route of SR 10 that existed almost entirely within the central city limits of Washington, in Wilkes County. It was concurrent with US 78 (and presumably SR 10) for its entire length.

In 1970, US 78/SR 10 were rerouted from the central part of town along SR 10 Loop in the northern part of Washington, with the former routing becoming US 78 Bus. (and presumably SR 10 Bus.).[33][34] In 1986, SR 10 Loop was decommissioned.[43][44]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1920) (PDF). Key Map System of State Aid Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1920.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Google Inc. "Route of SR 10 (Atlanta to Monroe)". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Freedom+Pkwy&daddr=Freedom+Pkwy+to:Freedom+Pkwy+to:Ponce+De+Leon+Ave+NE+to:Ponce+De+Leon+Ave+NE+to:33.7645421,-84.3113206+to:E+College+Ave+to:E+College+Ave+to:US-278+E+to:GA-10+E+to:GA-10+to:GA-10+E+to:Unknown+road+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:Main+St+W+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E&hl=en&ll=33.802544,-84.065323&spn=0.522646,1.056747&sll=33.805486,-83.724527&sspn=0.002042,0.004128&geocode=FYQiAwIdNoL4-g%3BFR4zAwIdIMT4-g%3BFdVYAwIdNcX4-g%3BFQZZAwIdp-_4-g%3BFQ9QAwId4Vz5-g%3BFb40AwId6IL5-inl-bY8KAf1iDHyP7UeWxT_bA%3BFTZOAwId0Mv5-g%3BFZBUAwIdTt75-g%3BFUtWAwIdiVj6-g%3BFcpcAwIdUH36-g%3BFZFnAwIdwZD6-g%3BFYz5AwIdpJH7-g%3BFYUQBAIdxL77-g%3BFRUdBAId3v37-g%3BFVMXBAId7jD8-g%3BFakYBAIdBVX8-g%3BFepRBAIdFDT9-g%3BFbqfBAIdPvT9-g%3BFTSaBAIdPlv--g%3BFcVUBAId78D_-g%3BFWFDBAIdu_b_-g%3BFZQ_BAIdtBAA-w%3BFejLAwIdjg0C-w%3BFerGAwIdVj8C-w%3BFQrUAwIdkXIC-w&mra=mi&mrsp=24&sz=19&via=5&t=h&z=11. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
    Google Inc. "Route of SR 10 (Monroe to east of Thomson)". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Unknown+road&daddr=US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+BUS+E+to:US-78+BUS+E+to:W+Broad+St+to:Oconee+St+to:Athens+Rd+to:Main+St+to:Main+St+to:GA-22+W%2FUS-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:Lexington+Rd+to:US-78+E+to:Unknown+road+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:Thomson+Bypass+to:GA-17+Alt&hl=en&ll=33.772298,-83.117065&spn=1.045654,2.113495&sll=33.476315,-82.471914&sspn=0.002049,0.004128&geocode=FQrUAwIdkXIC-w%3BFbDZAwIdsPUC-w%3BFST2AwIdCyUD-w%3BFcZEBQIdNcAE-w%3BFbShBQIdQrEF-w%3BFTfiBQIdSHQG-w%3BFd31BQId5OIG-w%3BFVgcBgIdRJgH-w%3BFUYABgId2Q4I-w%3BFRboBAId8r0L-w%3BFa_XBAIdVsQL-w%3BFRjFBAIdrOQL-w%3BFUKPBAId8xIM-w%3BFXAfAwIdluEQ-w%3BFVjsAgIdX2QR-w%3BFcTmAgIdzp0R-w%3BFUvWAgIdFsAR-w%3BFVugAgIdJd4R-w%3BFQWWAgIdouMR-w%3BFUY0AgId4kUS-w%3BFVPr_wEdiP4U-w%3BFXWC_wEduhUV-w%3BFY3y_gEdRE4V-w%3BFdPN_gEdJZUV-w&mra=mi&mrsp=23&sz=19&t=h&z=10. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
    Google Inc. "Route of SR 10 (East of Thomson to Augusta)". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=GA-17+Alt&daddr=GA-17+Alt+to:W+Milledgeville+Rd+to:US-278+E%2FUS-78+E+to:US-278+E%2FUS-78+E+to:US-278+E%2FUS-78+E+to:US-278+E%2FUS-78+E+to:US-278+E%2FUS-78+E+to:US-25+N%2FUS-278+E%2FUS-78+E+to:U.S.+1+N%2FUS-25+N%2FUS-278+E%2FUS-78+E+to:U.S.+1+N%2FUS-25+N%2FUS-278+E%2FUS-78+E&hl=en&ll=33.468108,-82.164688&spn=0.524679,1.056747&sll=33.475223,-81.955481&sspn=0.002049,0.004128&geocode=FdPN_gEdJpUV-w%3BFX6H_gEdD30V-w%3BFcfd_QEdYAEY-w%3BFR4y_gEd7Rca-w%3BFdRD_gEdJvoa-w%3BFaFn_gEd3pcb-w%3BFb49_gEdBmkc-w%3BFag3_gEderoc-w%3BFRNK_gEdmxEd-w%3BFULA_gEdCHAd-w%3BFWTM_gEdZXYd-w&mra=mi&mrsp=10&sz=19&t=h&z=11. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  3. ^ Federal Highway Administration (October 1, 2012) (PDF). National Highway System: Atlanta, GA (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/georgia/atlanta_ga.pdf. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d Federal Highway Administration (November 15, 2013) (PDF). National Highway System: (Draft) Georgia (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/georgia/ga_georgia.pdf. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Federal Highway Administration (October 1, 2012) (PDF). National Highway System: Athens-Clarke County, GA (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/georgia/athens_ga.pdf. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  6. ^ Federal Highway Administration (November 15, 2013) (PDF). National Highway System: (Draft) Augusta-Richmond County, GA--SC (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/georgia/augusta_ga.pdf. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  7. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (September 23, 1921) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1921.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  8. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1926) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1926.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  9. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1932) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1932_01.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  10. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (February 1, 1932) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1932_02.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  11. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (December 1, 1933) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1933_12.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  12. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1934) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1934_01.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  13. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (February 1, 1934) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1934_02.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  14. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (March 1, 1934) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1934_03.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  15. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1934) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1934_04-05.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  16. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1934) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1934_10.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  17. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1937) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1937_01.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  18. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1937) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1937_04.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  19. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (August 1, 1938) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1938_08.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  20. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (September 1, 1938) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1938_09.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  21. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1939) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1939_07.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  22. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1941) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1941_07.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  23. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1942) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1942.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  24. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1945.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  25. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (November 7, 1946) (PDF). System of State Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1946.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  26. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1957) (PDF). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1957.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  27. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1, 1960) (PDF). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1960_1961.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  28. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1, 1963) (PDF). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1964.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  29. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1966) (PDF). State Highway System and Connections (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1966.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  30. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1967) (PDF). State Highway System and Connections (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1967.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  31. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1968) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1968.pdf. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  32. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1969) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1969.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  33. ^ a b c d e f State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1970) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1970.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  34. ^ a b c d e State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1971) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1971.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  35. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1974) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1975.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  36. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1975) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1976.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  37. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1976) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1977.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  38. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1976) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1978.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  39. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1979) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1979.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  40. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (March 1, 1980) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1980_1981.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  41. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (March 1, 1980) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1981.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  42. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1981) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1982.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  43. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1986) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1987.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  44. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1987) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1988.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  45. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1988) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1989.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
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  47. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1991) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1992.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  48. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1992) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1993.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
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  51. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1, 1996) (PDF). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1996_1997.pdf. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  52. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Route of SR 10 Business (Monroe)". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Unknown+road&daddr=W+Spring+St+to:W+Spring+St+to:Unknown+road&hl=en&ll=33.802865,-83.721957&spn=0.032665,0.066047&sll=33.805584,-83.692769&sspn=0.002042,0.004128&geocode=FdTLAwIdrw0C-w%3BFSesAwIdHTAC-w%3BFdiqAwIdOqMC-w%3BFXzXAwIde_IC-w&mra=dme&mrsp=3&sz=19&t=h&z=15. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  53. ^ Google Inc. "Route of SR 10 Loop". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=US-78+E&daddr=US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-78+E+to:US-129+N%2FUS-29+N%2FUS-441+N+to:US-129+N%2FUS-29+N%2FUS-441+N+to:US-129+N%2FUS-29+N%2FUS-441+N+to:US-129+N%2FUS-441+N+to:US-129+N%2FUS-441+N+to:US-129+N+to:US-129+N+to:GA-10+Loop+S%2FGA-8+W+to:GA-10+Loop+S%2FGA-8+W+to:GA-10+Loop+S+to:GA-10+Loop+S+to:GA-10+Loop+S&hl=en&ll=33.94336,-83.406658&spn=0.120905,0.264187&sll=33.91249,-83.44856&sspn=0.00189,0.004128&geocode=FRN1BQIdP7AG-w%3BFXeEBQIdID4H-w%3BFfeNBQIdjKwH-w%3BFWq4BQIdZOUH-w%3BFULwBQId8wUI-w%3BFZQ-BgIdUyMI-w%3BFeRiBgIdNxoI-w%3BFaN5BgIdQSgI-w%3BFb14BgIdefYH-w%3BFah3BgIdTs0H-w%3BFehpBgIdCY8H-w%3BFVVfBgIdBkUH-w%3BFVhGBgIdBwUH-w%3BFWDoBQIdzoUG-w%3BFcKWBQIdQngG-w%3BFf18BQIda44G-w%3BFRN1BQIdP7AG-w&mra=dme&mrsp=16&sz=19&t=h&z=13. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  54. ^ a b c d e f Google Inc. "Georgia State Route 10". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=GA-10+Loop+S&daddr=US-129+N+to:GA-10+Loop+S&hl=en&ll=33.944357,-83.399105&spn=0.083166,0.169086&sll=33.944072,-83.406143&sspn=0.083166,0.169086&geocode=FaR3BQIdu6EG-w%3BFb5cBgIdqGsH-w%3BFRZ4BQIdU58G-w&mra=dme&mrsp=2&sz=13&t=m&z=13. Retrieved December 27, 2013.
  55. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (May 5, 2005). Georgia Rail System (Map). http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/railroad/Georgia_Rail_Map_plain.pdf. Retrieved December 27, 2013.
  56. ^ State Route 10 Loop New Exit Numbers[dead link]
  57. ^ a b Google Inc. "Route of SR 10 Business (Washington)". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Lexington+Ave&daddr=GA-10+BUS+E%2FUS-78+BUS+E+to:E+Robert+Toombs+Ave+to:E+Robert+Toombs+Ave&hl=en&ll=33.7409,-82.747908&spn=0.065378,0.132093&sll=33.727077,-82.715855&sspn=0.002043,0.004128&geocode=FYEgAwId590Q-w%3BFbbMAgId4loR-w%3BFcfGAgIdopkR-w%3BFdufAgIdDt4R-w&mra=mi&mrsp=3&sz=19&t=h&z=14. Retrieved June 1, 2014.

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing