List of former state routes in Georgia (U.S. state)

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Georgia 69.svg Georgia 754.svg
Standard state highway markers
Highway names
State: Georgia State Route XX (SR XX)
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This is a List of former state routes in the U.S. state of Georgia. This list represents routes that traveled through the state but are no longer in operation, have been decommissioned, or have been renumbered.

Route 9E[edit]

State Route 9E
Location: Forsyth, Dawson, and Lumpkin counties
Length: 21.319 mi[1] (34.310 km)
Existed: Early 1941–around 1982

State Route 9E (SR 9E) was originally constructed early in 1941.[2] In July 1981, as the extension of SR 400 had reached SR 60 in Dahlonega, this designation was removed.[3]

The routing that was followed by SR 9E starts where Hopewell Road splits from the current SR 9 north of Coal Mountain in Forsyth County, and parallels SR 400 very closely. The road changes names to Lumpkin Campground Road as it crosses into Dawson County, passes by the North Georgia Premium Outlet Mall, then crosses SR 53 and SR 400 in rapid succession. Just before intersecting with SR 136 the road changes names again to Harmony Church Road, then is called Auraria Road as it becomes SR 136. The road crosses SR 400 once more to its west, parts ways with SR 136, then travels north through the community of Auraria into Lumpkin County to its northern terminus at SR 9/SR 52 west of Dahlonega.[1] [4]

Route 13W[edit]

State Route 13W
Location:


Route 69[edit]

State Route 69
Location: Towns County
Length: 1 mi[5] (2 km)
Existed: Early 1930s–1958

State Route 69 (SR 69) was a state route located entirely in Towns County in the extreme northern part of the state. The route traveled from US 76/SR 2 north to the North Carolina state line, where it became North Carolina Highway 69. SR 69 followed the roadway currently designated as the concurrency of SR 17/SR 515. It was formed sometime in the early 1930s, and was renumbered in 1958.

Route 131[edit]

State Route 131
Location:

State Route 131 (SR 131) was a state route located entirely in McIntosh County in the coastal part of the state. Established as a highway number in 1936, the first routing followed present-day SR 99 east of US 17 from Darien to the present-day terminus of SR 57. It was moved to Harris Neck Road east of US 17 as a fully paved route in 1944 and extended along Jones Road in 1948 via a brief concurrency with US 17. When the route was extended along Jones Road, it became a double spur with both sections extending off of US 17/SR 25. This was the only such instance of a highway in Georgia where neither of the two endpoints terminated at a state highway. The western leg of SR 131 extended to the Jones community along present-day Jones Road continuing as a county road beyond the western end. The eastern portion (Harris Neck Road) extended to Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge. The western leg was the first to be decommissioned, turned to the county in 1977. The eastern leg lasted longer, most likely held back to obtain funding for a couple bridge replacement projects, until 1989.

Route 134[edit]

State Route 134
Location:

State Route 134 (SR 134) was a state route located in Telfair and Wheeler Counties. It began at SR 149 and ended at SR 19. This route is now Tom Haley Road from SR 149 to US 23 and County Road 197 from US 23 to SR 19.

Route 143[edit]

State Route 143
Location: Dade, Walker, Gordon, and Pickens counties
Length: 61.044 mi[1] (98.241 km)
Existed: 1937–1979

The designation of State Route 143 (SR 143) was initially used for a 18.8-mile-long (30.3 km) stretch of what is today signed as SR 136 and SR 136 Connector, from an intersection with SR 2 east of LaFayette to Georgia.[6] By 1941, an additional portion of SR 143 had been graded, traveling from SR 53 east of Fairmount to SR 5 in Tate; this roadway is called Henderson Mountain Road to its intersection with SR 108, and is designated as SR 108 to Tate at the present.[7] By 1949, the part of today's SR 136 from the Alabama state line to Calhoun had all been re-designated as SR 143.[8] It was in 1979 when the portion of the route from the Alabama state line to Calhoun was re-designated as SR 136, and the portion from Fairmount to Tate as SR 379, which meant the disappearance of the designation of SR 143 in Georgia.[9] The primary portion of SR 143, from the Alabama state line to Calhoun, measured 61.044 miles (98.241 km).[1]

Route 148[edit]

State Route 148
Location:


Route 160[edit]

State Route 160
Location: Clayton County and DeKalb County
Length: 5.7 mi[citation needed] (9.2 km)

State Route 160 (SR 160) was a state route in northern Clayton and southwestern DeKalb counties. Its western terminus was at US 19/US 41 and SR 3 near I-285, from which it proceeded in an east-southeasterly direction through Forest Park for approximately 2.0 miles (3.2 km) to an intersection with SR 54 near Lake City. The route then turned north-northwest, concurrent with SR 54 for about 1.4 miles (2.3 km), then turned northeast for 2.3 miles (3.7 km) before reaching its eastern terminus at US 23/SR 42, again near I-285.

SR 160 was turned back to local maintenance in the mid-1990s, likely due to its proximity to SR 331, which was separated from SR 160 by little more than a set of railroad tracks in Forest Park. The segment between SR 54 and US 23 still survives as SR 54 Connector.

For a time, it was uncertain whether the designation route had in fact been removed in full due to an official Georgia Department of Transportation map of Clayton County dated 2005 continuing to label a portion of the route between SR 54 and the DeKalb County line as SR 160.[citation needed] However, that map was later updated and the label was changed to indicate the route as SR 54 Connector.[citation needed]

Route 161[edit]

State Route 161
Location: CedartownCave Spring

State Route 161 (SR 161) was a state route in southern Floyd and northern Polk counties. Its southern terminus was at US 27/SR 1 in Cedartown (now both Business Routes). It proceeded northwest to Cave Spring to an intersection with US 411/SR 53. The route was later redesignated in as an extended SR 100.

Route 163[edit]

State Route 163
Location:


Route 167[edit]

State Route 167
Location:


Route 170[edit]

State Route 170
Location:


Route 175[edit]

This section is about the former state highway. For the proposed Interstate Highway, see Interstate 175 (Georgia).

State Route 175
Location:


Route 176[edit]

State Route 176
Location: Powder SpringsAcworth
Length: 15 mi[10] (24 km)

State Route 176 (SR 176) in Georgia was a state route in Cobb County. It traveled for about 15 miles (24 km) from US 278 (C.H. James Parkway) in Powder Springs to US 41 (Cobb Parkway) in Acworth. SR 176 was located entirely within Cobb County. The route was also known as Richard Sailors Parkway, New Macland Road, Lost Mountain Road, and Mars Hill Road. Famous landmarks along the former route include Lost Mountain Store, which is now a bank, and McEachern High School, which was once an A&M school. SR 176 was turned over to county maintenance in 2010.

County Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Cobb Powder Springs US 278 / SR 6 – Hiram, Lithia Springs Southern terminus
Macland SR 360 – Dallas, Marietta
Lost Mountain SR 120 – Dallas, Marietta
Acworth US 41 / SR 3 – Cartersville, Kennesaw Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Route 179[edit]

State Route 179
Location:


Route 205[edit]

State Route 205
Location: Cherokee County

State Route 205 (SR 205) was assigned to Bells Ferry Road in Cherokee County. This route was turned over to county maintenance in 1985. Though Bells Ferry Road does connect downtown Marietta with Canton, SR 205 began at its intersection with SR 92 in the Oak Grove district of southern Cherokee County. In the mid 1990s, Bells Ferry Road underwent an upgrade to a four-lane urban design roadway. This expansion of Bells Ferry Road, including part of the former SR 205, started at I-575 and ended at South Fork Way, just north of Kellogg Creek Road (Old SR 92).

Motorists use this road to access places such as the Little River Marina area of Lake Allatoona, Towne Lake Parkway, and the Bridge Mill development area south of Canton. The route originally formed a cutoff between Acworth and Canton that was needed until the need was reduced by the completion of I-575. There are no plans to restore the state designation of 205.

Route 207[edit]

State Route 207
Location:


Route 209[edit]

State Route 209
Location:


Route 210[edit]

State Route 210
Location:


Route 213[edit]

State Route 213
Location:


Route 214[edit]

State Route 214
Location:


Route 217[edit]

State Route 217
Location:


Route 218[edit]

State Route 218
Location:


Route 221[edit]

State Route 221
Location:


Route 222[edit]

State Route 222
Location:


Route 226[edit]

State Route 226
Location:


Route 229[edit]

State Route 229
Location:


Route 235[edit]

State Route 235
Location:


Route 238[edit]

State Route 238
Location:


Route 239[edit]

State Route 239
Location:


Route 244[edit]

State Route 244
Location:


Route 245[edit]

State Route 245
Location:


Route 248[edit]

State Route 248
Location:


Route 249[edit]

State Route 249
Location:


Route 250[edit]

State Route 250
Location: GlennvilleDaisy

State Route 250 (SR 250) was a state route in Evans County. It began at an intersection with US 301 in Glennville and traveled northeast to US 280 in Daisy.

Route 258[edit]

State Route 258
Location:


Route 259[edit]

State Route 259
Location:


Route 261[edit]

State Route 261
Location:


Route 263[edit]

State Route 263
Location:


Route 265[edit]

State Route 265
Location:


Route 267[edit]

State Route 267
Location:


Route 269[edit]

State Route 269
Location:


Route 276[edit]

State Route 276
Location:


Route 277[edit]

State Route 277
Location:


Route 287[edit]

State Route 287
Location: West-central Georgia
Length: 3 mi (5 km)

State Route 287 (SR 287) was a north-south state route located in the west-central part of the state. The route traveled from its southern terminus at the MaconTaylor county line southeast of Reynolds north to SR 96. This route is currently known as Gen John B. Gordon Road.

Route 289[edit]

State Route 289
Location: HazlehurstGraham
Length: 9 mi (14 km)

State Route 289 (SR 289) was a north-south state route located in the southeastern part of the state. The route traveled from its southern terminus at US 23/SR 19 southeast of Hazlehurst north to US 341/SR 27 in Graham. The route was only partially paved when it was turned back to local authorities in 1979.

Route 290[edit]

State Route 290
Location: Quitman County
Length: 2 mi (3 km)

State Route 290 (SR 290) was a north-south state route located in Quitman County in the southwestern part of the state. The route connected the town of Morris with US 82/SR 50. The route was turned back to local maintenance in 1981.

Route 291[edit]

State Route 291
Location: Quitman County
Length: 2 mi (3 km)

State Route 291 (SR 291) was a north-south state route located in Quitman County in the southwestern part of the state. The route connected the town of Hatcher with US 82/SR 50. The route was turned back to local authorities in 1981.

Route 294[edit]

State Route 294
Location:


Route 295[edit]

State Route 295
Location:


Route 304[edit]

State Route 304
Location: Columbia County
Length: 6 mi[11] (10 km)

State Route 304 (SR 304) was a north-south state route located in Columbia County in the eastern part of the state. From the route's southern terminus at the former routing of SR 47 in Appling, the route traveled north-northeast concurrent with US 221. The route met its northern terminus at SR 150 northeast of Appling. The route is now part of SR 47.

Route 312[edit]

State Route 312
Location: BainbridgeWhigham
Length: 15.4 mi[12] (24.8 km)

State Route 312 (SR 312) was an east-west state route located in the southwestern part of the state. From the route's western terminus at US 27 Bus./SR 1 Bus. in Bainbridge east, then southeast, to its eastern terminus at US 84/SR 38 in Whigham. The route was turned back to local authorities in 1979.

Route 318[edit]

State Route 318
Location: Dawson County
Length: 6.351 mi[1] (10.221 km)
Existed: around 1960–around 1984

State Route 318 (SR 318) was originally constructed around 1960.[13] Around 1986, this designation was removed.[14]

The routing that was followed by SR 318 originally started about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) west of the current SR 9, about 1 mile (1.6 km) north of where SR 369 Conn. meets SR 9 in Dawson County. For most of its existence, the state route portion started at the intersection with SR 9, however. The route crosses the former SR 9E, then US 19/SR 400 in rapid succession, and continues to its intersection with SR 53 just east of SR 400 and the North Georgia Premium Outlet Mall. The roadway is known as Dawson Forest Road today.[1][4]

Route 319[edit]

This section is about the former state highway. For the current U.S. Highway, see U.S. Route 319 in Georgia.

State Route 319
Location:


Route 321[edit]

State Route 321
Location:


Route 322[edit]

State Route 322
Location:


Route 336[edit]

State Route 336
Location:


Route 340[edit]

State Route 340
Location:


Route 342[edit]

State Route 342
Location: Dawson County
Length: 5.240 mi[1] (8.433 km)
Existed: 1963–1983

State Route 342 (SR 342) was originally constructed in 1963.[15] In 1983, this designation was removed.[16]

The routing that was followed by SR 342 starts where Keith Evans Road splits from the current SR 183, about 3 miles (4.8 km) north of SR 53 in Dawson County. The route crosses SR 136, changes names to Bailey Waters Road, and continues to its intersection with SR 52 east of Amicalola Falls State Park.[1][4]

Route 343[edit]

State Route 343
Location:


Route 344[edit]

State Route 344
Location:

State Route 344 (SR 344) was a state route that used to travel parallel to US 411.

Route 346[edit]

State Route 346
Location: Jackson County
Length: 5.36 mi[10] (8.63 km)

State Route 346 (SR 346) was a short east-west route located entirely in Jackson County in the northeastern part of the state. From its western terminus at US 129/SR 11 in Talmo, the route traveled east through rural portions of Jackson County until it reached its eastern terminus at SR 82 in Pendergrass. It was turned back to local maintenance in late 2003.

Route 349[edit]

State Route 349
Location:


Route 351[edit]

State Route 351
Location: JonesboroMcDonough
Length: 13 mi[17] (21 km)

State Route 351 (SR 351) is a former state route. The highway was an east–west route that began at the intersection of Main Street (Old SR 3) and College Street in Jonesboro, in Clayton County and ended at US 23/SR 42 1 mile (1.6 km) east of Flippen north of McDonough, in Henry County. It had an interchange with I-75 at exit 222. SR 351 totaled approximately 13 miles (21 km) in length. The state route traveled through the cities of Jonesboro and the unincorporated community of Flippen.

SR 351 saw its final days in 1982. However the route signage remained on I-75 until the early 1990s. This route lasted 20 years, originally commissioned in FY 1962-63. Although it no longer exists, many modern maps still show SR 351. It is now known as Jodeco Road in Henry County and Lake Jodeco Road/Charles Q. Carter Highway in Clayton County near Lake Spivey.

Route 353[edit]

State Route 353
Location:


Route 357[edit]

State Route 357
Location: Muscogee County
Length: 15.5 mi (24.9 km)

State Route 357 (SR 357) was a north-south state route located in Muscogee County in the western part of the state. From the route's southern terminus at Fort Benning (previously, the route's southern terminus had been at US 27), the route traveled north, then east, then north along several different roadways[clarification needed] before reaching its northern terminus at US 80/SR 22 northeast of Columbus The route was turned back to local maintenance in 1982.

Route 359[edit]

State Route 359
Location:


Route 361[edit]

State Route 361
Location: Bibb County
Length: 21 mi (34 km)

State Route 361 (SR 361) was a north-south state route located in Bibb County in the central part of the state. From the route's southern terminus at US 41/US 129/SR 247 south of Macon, SR 361 traveled west, then north, around downtown Macon, to its northern terminus at US 23/SR 87 north of Macon. The route was turned back to local maintenance in 1982.

Route 363[edit]

State Route 363
Location: Early County
Length: 19 mi (31 km)

State Route 363 (SR 363) was a north-south state route located in Early County in the southwestern part of the state. From the route's southern terminus at US 84/SR 38 in Saffold, the route traveled north, then northeast, to its northern terminus at SR 39 in Blakely.

Route 363 Spur[edit]

State Route 363 Spur
Location: Early County

SR 363 had a banner route, State Route 363 Spur (SR 363 Spur), that traveled along the current alignment of SR 273 and SR 273 Spur west to the Chattahoochee River. The route was turned back to local maintenance in 1982.

Route 364[edit]

State Route 364
Location: Brooks County, Thomas County

State Route 364 (SR 364) was a east-west state route located in Brooks County and Thomas County in the southern part of the state. It's western terminas was in Boston and it's eastern terminus was in Quitman. State Route 364 was decommissioned in 1982.[18]

Route 366[edit]

State Route 366
Location: Hart County
Length: 10 mi (20 km)

State Route 366 (SR 366) was a north-south state route located in Hart County in the northeastern part of the state. From the route's southern terminus at SR 51 west of Hartwell, SR 366 traveled north, concurrent with SR 77. SR 77 departed to the west, and SR 366 continued north to its northern terminus at I-85, northeast of Lavonia. The route was renumbered as SR 77 in 1990.

Route 367[edit]

State Route 367
Location: Chatham County
Existed: 1969–1984

State Route 367 (SR 367) was an east-west state route located in Chatham County in the east-central part of the state. The route, which connected to US 80/SR 26 at both ends, traveled along Johnny Mercer Boulevard across Whitemarsh and Wilmington islands. The route, which was renumbered from SR 26 Loop in 1969, was turned back to local maintenance in 1984.

Route 373[edit]

State Route 373
Location: Gordon County
Existed: 1972–1977

State Route 373 (SR 373) was an east-west state route located in Gordon County in the northwestern part of the state. From the route's western terminus at SR 156 in Calhoun, SR 373 traveled south along Barrett Street before traveling east on Dews Pond Road to the community of Cash, before turning south on Cash Road to its eastern terminus at SR 53 in Sonoraville. The route only existed from 1972 to 1977.

Route 375[edit]

State Route 375
Location:


Route 379[edit]

State Route 379
Location: Pickens County
Existed: 1977–1981

State Route 379 (SR 379) was an east-west state route located in Pickens County in the northern part of the state. From the route's western terminus at SR 53 east of Fairmount the route traveled east-southeast along Henderson Mountain Road to its eastern terminus at SR 108 west of Tate. The route was formed in 1977, after previously being numbered as SR 143, and was turned back to local maintenance in 1981, having never been fully paved.

Route 381[edit]

State Route 381
Location: Paulding County
Existed: 1980–1992

State Route 381 (SR 381) was a north-south state route located in Paulding County in the northwestern part of the state. From the route's southern terminus at US 278/SR 6 in Dallas the route traveled northeast to its northern terminus at SR 92 northeast of New Hope. The route was formed in 1980, after previously being numbered as SR 92 and SR 92 Spur, and was turned back to local authorities in 1992.[19]

On April 4, 1977, Southern Airways Flight 242 attempted a landing on this stretch of highway near New Hope, in Paulding County. The DC-9 crashed, killing the flight crew, 60 passengers, and 8 people on the ground. It also destroyed a gas station, grocery store, and other structures.

Route 387[edit]

State Route 387
Location: East PointCollege Park
Length: 2.9 mi[21] (4.7 km)
Existed: 1991[22]–1991[20]

State Route 387 (SR 387) was a state route that existed in 1991 and traveled between East Point and College Park. It traveled along Camp Creek Parkway from I-285 in East Point to I-85 in College Park near Atlanta.[21] The highway was added mostly to provide a northern terminus for the proposed extension to SR 314.[clarification needed] When that project was canceled, SR 387 was returned to local control. However, the highway was restored to state control in 2000 as an extension of SR 6 with the highway extending west of I-285 up to Austell.[22][20]


County Location Mile[21] km Destinations Notes
Fulton East Point 0.0 0.0 I‑285 Western terminus
FultonClayton College Park 2.8 4.5 US 29 / SR 314 (Main Street)
Clayton 2.9 4.7 I‑85 – Columbus Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Route 754[edit]

State Route 754
Location: Marietta-Woodstock
Existed: 1986–2000

State Route 754 (SR 754) was a designation assigned to Canton Road in Cobb and Cherokee counties in the U.S. state of Georgia. It began at SR 5 Spur in Marietta and ended at SR 92 in Woodstock.

The highway designation was assigned in 1986 to replace SR 5 when it was removed from Canton Road, to allow the state to fund improvements to the road. As portions of the project were completed or cancelled, the SR 754 designation was gradually rescinded, finally being removed altogether in 2000.

Canton Road was designated as SR 754 when SR 5 was relocated to I-575 in 1986. This number was assigned to Old SR 5 to facilitate funding for the completion of a previously planned widening project along the two- and three-lane portions of route between the Canton Road Connector (SR 5 Spur) and Sixes Road in Holly Springs. No portion of the route was either signed nor maintained by the Georgia Department of Transportation.

The portion between SR 92 and Sixes Road was decommissioned in the early 1990s when the widening project was canceled, although improvements were constructed on that portion. The remainder was built from south to north and was decommissioned in phases as each portion was completed respectively in 1992, 1995, and 1998. The last portion was completed as an extension of the SR 92 widening project in the city of Woodstock in 2000 between the Woodstock city limits and just north of SR 92. When that last section was completed, SR 754 was decommissioned.

SR 754 is unique in the amount of confusion it caused.[citation needed] Maps continue to show the route 20 years after it first appeared, though it only existed on paper. Part of this is because it was a logical extension of SR 5 Spur, which ends where the Canton Road Connector to I-75 meets the former SR 5 mainline. Locals today continue to call this road "Highway 5" in addition to Canton Road.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "County GIS Base map shapefiles/geodatabases (varies by county)". Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 11, 2013. 
  2. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia. State of Georgia System of State Roads (Map) (January 1, 1941 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1941_01.pdf. Retrieved January 11, 2013.
  3. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation. Georgia Highway System and Connections (Map) (January 1982 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1982.pdf. Retrieved January 11, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation. Geographic Transportation Reporting Analysis and Query System (GeoTRAQS) (Map). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/geotraqs/Pages/default.aspx. Retrieved January 11, 2013.
  5. ^ GA 69 on Southeast Roads[dead link]
  6. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia. State of Georgia System of State Roads (Map) (April 1937 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1937_04.pdf. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  7. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia. State of Georgia System of State Roads (Map) (July 1, 1941 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1941_07.pdf. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  8. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia. State of Georgia System of State Roads (Map) (April 1, 1949 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1949.pdf. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  9. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation. State of Georgia Highway System and Connections (Map) (January 1979 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1979.pdf. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  10. ^ a b [1][dead link]
  11. ^ Accessed February 15, 2007.[dead link]
  12. ^ Accessed February 15, 2007.[dead link]
  13. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation. State of Georgia Highway System and Connections (Map) (June 1, 1960 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1960-1961.pdf. Retrieved January 14, 2013.
  14. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation. State of Georgia Highway System and Connections (Map) (January 1986 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1986-1987.pdf. Retrieved January 14, 2013.
  15. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation. State of Georgia Highway System and Connections (Map) (June 1, 1963 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1963.pdf. Retrieved January 14, 2013.
  16. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation. State of Georgia Highway System and Connections (Map) (January 1983 ed.). http://www.dot.state.ga.us/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1983-1984.pdf. Retrieved January 14, 2013.
  17. ^ [2][dead link]
  18. ^ http://www.geocities.com/garoadwarrior76/garoutelog361_380.html[dead link] Accessed January 24, 2007
  19. ^ Accessed January 23, 2007.[dead link]
  20. ^ a b Georgia State Highway Department (January 1, 1992) (PDF). Georgia State Highway System (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1992_1993.pdf. Retrieved June 1, 2013.
  21. ^ a b c Google Inc. "Route of SR 378". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Camp+Creek+Pkwy&daddr=Unknown+road&hl=en&ll=33.649529,-84.473834&spn=0.03033,0.066047&sll=33.656468,-84.498505&sspn=0.001895,0.004128&geocode=FaeOAQIdvqf2-g%3BFS5fAQIdM2n3-g&dirflg=h&mra=dme&mrsp=0&sz=19&t=h&z=15. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  22. ^ a b Georgia State Highway Department (January 1, 1991) (PDF). Georgia State Highway System (Map). Cartography by GSHD. http://www.dot.ga.gov/informationcenter/maps/Documents/StateMaps/1991_1992.pdf. Retrieved June 1, 2013.

External links[edit]