Gerald Flood

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Gerald Flood
Gerald Flood.jpg
Born Gerald Robert Flood
21 April 1927
Portsmouth, Hampshire, England
Died 12 April 1989 (aged 61)
Farnham, Surrey, England
Cause of death Heart attack
Occupation Actor
Years active 1948-1989

Gerald Robert Flood (21 April 1927–12 April 1989) was a British actor of stage and television.

Early life[edit]

Flood was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, but lived for most of his life in Farnham, Surrey, where he regularly appeared on stage at the Castle Theatre. As a teenager, he served as a wireless operator during World War II, and worked as a filing clerk before becoming an actor.

Career[edit]

Gerald Flood's first television starring roles were in the popular ABC science-fiction television serials; Pathfinders in Space, Pathfinders to Mars and Pathfinders to Venus. 1960-1, as journalist Conway Henderson, which were follow up sequels to Target Luna. This was followed in 1962-3 by the series City Beneath the Sea and its sequel, Secret Beneath the Sea, when he played the role of Mark Bannerman.

He came to national prominence whilst starring alongside Patrick Allen and Sam Kydd in the Morocco-based police series, Crane, which ran from 1963 to 1965 on ITV. In this he played the character of police chief Colonel Sharif Mahmoud.

Theatre[edit]

(1957) He performed in the pantomime, "Mother Goose," at the Connaught Theatre in Worthing, Surrey, England with Douglas Byng, Eve Lister, Ann Lancaster, Rosalie Ashley, Reg Thompson, The Hedley Ward Trio, and Roland Curram in the cast. Guy Vaesen and Thurza Rogers were directors.

(1959) He acted in Graham Greene's play, "The Complaisant Lover," at the Globe Theatre in London, England with Ralph Richardson, Paul Scofield, Phyllis Calvert, Lockwood West, Helen Lowry, Polly Adams, Hugh Janes, and Oliver Burt in the cast. John Gielgud was director.

(1959) He acted in Graham Greene's play, "The Complaisant Lover," at the Opera House in Manchester, England with Ralph Richardson, Paul Scofield, Phyllis Calvert, Lockwood West, Helen Lowry, Polly Adams, Hugh James, and Oliver Burt in the cast. John Gielgud was director.

(1960) He acted in Graham Greene's play, "The Complaisant Lover," at the Globe Theatre in London, England with Ralph Richardson, Alan Dobie, Phyllis Calvert, Lockwood West, Helen Lowry, Polly Adams, Hugh Janes, and Ernst Ulman in the cast. John Gielgud was director.

In June 1967 Flood took over from Donald Sinden the role of Robert Danvers in the hit comedy "There's A Girl In My Soup", at The Globe (now Gielgud) Theatre in London's West End, which he played until December 1968. He reprised the role during a UK tour of the play in 1972/3, including Wolverhampton, Leeds and Glasgow amongst other venues, and again at the Bristol Hippodome in June 1976. In total he played the role of Robert Danvers more than 650 times.

(1971) He played the role of Tom Hillyer in the Lesley Storm comedy, "Look, No Hands!" at the Fortune Theatre in London's West End.

(1974) He acted in JB Priestley's play, "Dangerous Corner," at the Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in Guildford, Surrey, England with Rachel Gurney, Barbara Jefford, and Christopher Good in the cast.

(1981) He acted in David Storey's play, "Early Days," in a British National Theatre production at the Comedy Theatre in London, England with Ralph Richardson, Sheila Ballantine, and Marty Cruickshank in the cast. Lindsay Anderson was director.

(1983) He acted in the play "Underground" at the Theatre Royal, York.

(1985) He acted in the play, "The Cabinet Mole," at the Richmond Theatre in Richmond, Surrey, England with Amanda Barrie, Bruce Montague, and Derek Bond in the cast.

Doctor Who[edit]

Perhaps Flood's best known work was in the BBC science fiction series Doctor Who as the voice of the robot companion Kamelion in two serials — The King's Demons and Planet of Fire as well as a brief scene in the regeneration serial The Caves of Androzani. Originally, the character was to have been featured more heavily in other serials but his scenes were edited out for timing reasons.

Other work[edit]

Flood also appeared in a number of television roles over the years. These included the ITC series The Champions, Strange Report and Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) and starred as spy Peregrine Smith in The Rat Catchers (1967). He portrayed Sir Richard Flashman in the BBC's popular 1971 television serial Tom Brown's Schooldays and was also in Bachelor Father. Flood also appeared in Steptoe and Son, Raffles, Two in Clover, The Madras House and Comedy Playhouse.[1]

Film[edit]

His film credits included Smokescreen (1964), Patton (1970), and Frightmare (1974).

Death[edit]

Flood died from a heart attack in 1989, 9 days before his 62nd birthday.

Family[edit]

Toby Flood, the English international rugby union player, is Flood's grandson.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stevens, Christopher (2010). Born Brilliant: The Life Of Kenneth Williams. John Murray. p. 408. ISBN 1-84854-195-3. 

V&A Theatre & Performance Enquiry Service Archives; Cameron Mackintosh Ltd. & Delfont Mackintosh Theatres Ltd. Archives; Personally held theatre programmes;

External links[edit]