Gerald O'Collins

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Gerald Glynn O'Collins SJ
Born Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Era 20th-century philosophy
Region Western Philosophy
School Christian philosophy, ecumenism
Main interests Theology, Christology
Influences

Gerald Glynn O'Collins SJ is an Australian Jesuit priest, author, academic and educator.[1] He is currently a research professor and writer-in-residence at the Jesuit Theological College (JTC) in Parkville, Victoria, and a research professor in theology at St Mary's University College in Twickenham.[2] For more than three decades, he was professor of systematic and fundamental theology at the Pontifical Gregorian University (Rome).[3]

In 2006, O'Collins was made a Companion of the General Division of the Order of Australia (AC), in recognition of his outstanding commitment to theological scholarship and ecumenical initiatives.[4]

Society of Jesus

History of the Jesuits
Regimini militantis
Suppression

Jesuit Hierarchy
Superior General
Adolfo Nicolás

Ignatian Spirituality
Spiritual Exercises
Ad majorem Dei gloriam
Magis

Notable Jesuits
St. Ignatius of Loyola
St. Francis Xavier
St. Peter Faber
St. Aloysius Gonzaga
St. Robert Bellarmine
St. Peter Canisius
St. Edmund Campion
Pope Francis

Life and career[edit]

Born in Melbourne, Australia, O'Collins studied at the University of Melbourne, where he took both a first-class honours baccalaureate degree and a master’s degree. He was ordained a Roman Catholic priest in 1963 and went on to earn a Licentiate in Sacred Theology (STL) at Heythrop College, London, in 1967. The next year he was made a Doctor of Theology by Cambridge University, where he held a research fellowship at Pembroke College. He taught at the Weston School of Theology (Boston Theological Institute) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the JTC in Melbourne for five years before accepting a professorship at the Gregorian University in Rome in 1973. He taught there until 2006. Additionally, he served as dean of the theological faculty for six years. After retiring from the Gregorian he was named research professor at St. Mary's University College.[5]

O'Collins's has received several honorary doctorates:[6] from the University of San Francisco (1991), University of Surrey (2003), Sacred Heart University (Bridgeport, Conn.) (2004); John Carroll University (Cleveland, Ohio) (2007); and a DD from Melbourne College of Divinity (2007); Honorary adjunct professor of Australian Catholic University (2007-2010).[7]

O'Collins organised and co-chaired international ecumenical symposia on the Resurrection (1996), the Trinity (1998), the Incarnation (2000), the Redemption (2003), and the legacy of Pope John Paul II (2008), also co-editing their proceedings.[8] He returned to Australia in 2009.

O'Collins has been an honorary visitor and a visiting scholar at Pembroke College, and he currently serves as an honorary adjunct professor at the Australian Catholic University. He has delivered the Fisher Lecture and the Margaret Beaufort Lecture at Cambridge and the Cardinal Hume Lectures at Heythrop College. Amongst other honours, he is the recipient of the Malipiero Prize, the Stefano Borgia European Prize, and the Johannes Quasten Medal given by Catholic University of America.[9]

Selected works[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Cf. academic record and bio-bibliographical details on Academic Staff Archive of the Diocese of Maitland-Newcastle's official website.
  2. ^ Biographical sources extracted from the Australian Government Gazette of 26 January 2006, pp.1-2.
  3. ^ Cf. ACU biography at Australian Catholic University, Faculty; HAI Symposium; GoodReads Biography.
  4. ^ Australian Government: Australian Honours 2006.
  5. ^ Cf. information on "Rev. Professor Gerald O'Collins SJ AC", Australian Catholic University, Melbourne.
  6. ^ As also listed by WIPF & STOCK Accessed 25 October 2012
  7. ^ Cf. O'Collins' CV on St. Mary's University College (Twickenham) website.
  8. ^ Cf. biographical details on Humble Approach Initiative, August 2011 Symposium.
  9. ^ See Australian Government websites, as listed on "ABC Broadcasting Personalities" Accessed 25 October 2012

External links[edit]