Gerald Schroeder

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Not to be confused with Gerhard Schröder.
Gerald L. Schroeder
Residence Jerusalem, Israel
Alma mater Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Gerald Lawrence Schroeder is an Orthodox Jewish physicist, author, lecturer and teacher at College of Jewish Studies Aish HaTorah's Discovery Seminar, Essentials and Fellowships programs and Executive Learning Center,[1] who focuses on what he perceives to be an inherent relationship between science and spirituality.

Education[edit]

Schroeder received his BSc in 1959, his MSc in 1961, and his PhD in nuclear physics and earth and planetary sciences in 1965, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).[2] He worked five years on the staff of the MIT physics department. He was a member of the United States Atomic Energy Commission.[3]

Aliyah to Israel[edit]

After emigrating to Israel in 1971, Schroeder was employed as a researcher at the Weizmann Institute of Science, the Volcani Research Institute, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.[4][5] He currently teaches at Aish HaTorah College of Jewish Studies.[6]

Religious views[edit]

His works frequently cite Talmudic, Midrashic and medieval commentaries on Biblical creation accounts, such as commentaries written by the Jewish philosopher Nachmanides. Among other things, Schroeder attempts to reconcile a six day creation as described in Genesis with the scientific evidence that the world is billions of years old using the idea that the perceived flow of time for a given event in an expanding universe varies with the observer’s perspective of that event. He attempts to reconcile the two perspectives numerically, calculating the effect of the stretching of space-time, based on Einstein's theory of general relativity.[7]

Antony Flew, an academic philosopher who promoted atheism for most of his adult life indicated that the arguments of Gerald Schroeder had influenced his decision to become a deist.[8][9]

Personal[edit]

Schroeder's wife Barbara Sofer is a popular columnist for the English language Israeli newspaper, Jerusalem Post. The couple have five children.

Prizes[edit]

In 2012, Schroeder was awarded the Trotter Prize by Texas A&M University's College of Science.[10]

Works[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Executive Learning Center Faculty". Retrieved 2010-12-13. 
  2. ^ Lowe, Chelsea (Sep–Oct 2006). "Nuclear Scientist Sees No God-Science Conflict". Technology Review. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  3. ^ Sacks, Brian (2 October 2007). "Where the Bible meets the Big Bang". sullivan-county.com. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  4. ^ Schroeder, Gerald (Fall 2006). "Finding the Intelligence Within the Design". Jewish Action: 17–22. 
  5. ^ Gerald Schroeder '59 at the Wayback Machine (archived January 14, 2008)
  6. ^ "About Dr. Gerald Schroeder". geraldschroeder.com. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  7. ^ Schroeder, Dr. Gerald. "Age of the Universe". aish.com. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  8. ^ "Antony Flew dies at 87; atheist philosopher who changed his mind late in life". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. 14 April 2010. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  9. ^ Oppenheimer, Mark (4 November 2007). "The Turning of an Atheist". The New York Times. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  10. ^ Trotter Prize & Endowed Lecture Series

External links[edit]

Articles by Gerald L. Schroeder[edit]