Gerardo Núñez

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Gerardo Núñez
Gerardo.jpg
Gerardo Núñez
Background information
Birth name Gerardo Núñez Díaz
Born (1961-06-29) June 29, 1961 (age 53)
Origin Jerez de la Frontera, Andalusia, Spain
Genres Flamenco music, Jazz
Occupations Composer, Guitarist
Instruments Guitar
Years active 1987–present
Associated acts Carmen Cortes, Perico Sambeat, Pablo Martín, Cepillo, Carmen Linares, Israel Galván
Website Gerardo Núñez

Gerardo Núñez Díaz (born 1961) is a Spanish guitarist and composer. His roots lie in flamenco, but he has also ventured into fusion with other genres, especially jazz.

Career[edit]

Núñez was born in Jerez de la Frontera (province of Cádiz) in 1961. His first teacher was Rafael [d]el Águila. At the age of fourteen he accompanied important cantaores and bailaores like Tío Gregorio el Borrico, Terremoto de Jerez, La Paquera and Mario Maya, among others. He has recorded as a concert guitarist and accompanying the voices of Turronero, Pansequito, Indio Gitano. In his triple roles of composer, concert guitarist and accompanist, he has performed in diverse theater shows, the most notable being Mario Maya's ¡Ay Jondo! and Lorca's Yerma. He has also performed at numerous music festivals around the world. Afterwards, as a solo artist, Gerardo Nuñez has received excellent reviews, and he is considered one of the best prepared guitarists. He has also performed on several flamenco stages, gatherings and festivals, both at a national level and abroad: Paris, New York, Cologne, Havana, Munich. He has also been part of a guitar quartet, with which he has travelled all over the world, and has played alongside guitarists of international renown like Erico Raba, Alex de Grassi and Briam Gare. Additionally he has collaborated with bassist Eberhard Weber and accordionist Richard Galliano.

As a composer, his music is complex and rich, but it allows him to demonstrate his playing ability, as he is a great guitarist. He has composed a large number of pieces for one of his best artistic partners, Carmen Cortés. He also made a version of El Amor Brujo, for four guitars, and he has even attempted fusion with other kinds of music, especially jazz, but without ever leaving out flamenco as its foundation.

In August 2012 his album Travesia rweached number 12 on the World Music Charts Europe.[1]

Discography[edit]

  • El Gallo Azul (Flamencos Accidentales, GASA, 1987)
  • Flamencos en Nueva York (Spain: GASA/Europe and USA: Verabra Records, 1989)
  • Flamencos en Nueva York (DRO East West, 1989). Midline CD compilation featuring tracks from El Gallo Azul and Flamencos en Nueva York.
  • Jucal (El Gallo Azul, 1994)
  • Jucal (Alula Records, 1997). Longer international version, featuring additional 15 minutes of music.
  • Salomé (Art-Danza, 1998). Soundtrack from the "Salomé" dance show.
  • Calima (Alula Records, 1998)
  • Jazzpaña II (Act 9284-2, 2000)
  • Cruce de Caminos, with Perico Sambeat (Resistencia RESCD 115, 2001)
  • Pasajes Passages, with Perico Sambeat (Resistencia, 2002)
  • Un Ramito de Locura, with Carmen Linares (Mercury, 2002)
  • La Nueva Escuela de la Guitarra Flamenca (ACT/Karonte, 2003)
  • Andando el Tiempo (ACT, 2004)
  • Travesia (ACT, 2012)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Johannes Theurer (list compiler) (August 1, 2012). "World Music Charts Europe August 2012". Worldmusic Workshop of the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). Retrieved August 1, 2012. 

External links[edit]