German destroyer Z10 Hans Lody

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Hans Lody 1939.jpg
Hans Lody c. 1939
Career (Nazi Germany)
Name: Z10 Hans Lody
Namesake: Hans Lody
Ordered: 9 January 1935
Builder: Germania, Kiel
Yard number: G536
Laid down: 1 April 1935
Launched: 14 May 1936
Completed: 13 September 1938
Captured: May 1945
Fate: Sold for scrap, 1949
General characteristics as built
Class & type: Type 1934A-class destroyer
Displacement: 2,171 metric tons (2,137 long tons)
Length: 119 m (390 ft 5 in) o/a
114 m (374 ft 0 in) w/l
Beam: 11.3 m (37 ft 1 in)
Draft: 4.23 m (13 ft 11 in)
Installed power: 70,000 shp (52,000 kW)
Propulsion: 2 shafts, 2 × Wagner geared steam turbines
6 × water-tube boilers
Speed: 36 knots (67 km/h; 41 mph)
Range: 1,825 nmi (3,380 km; 2,100 mi) at 19 knots (35 km/h; 22 mph)
Complement: 325
Armament: 5 × single 12.7 cm (5 in) guns
2 × 2 - 3.7 cm (1.5 in) anti-aircraft guns
6 × 1 - 2 cm (0.79 in) guns
2 × 4 - 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes
60 mines
32–64 depth charges, 4 throwers and 6 individual racks

Z10 Hans Lody was a Type 1934A-class destroyer built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine in the mid-1930s.

Service History[edit]

Hans Lody spent much of the early months of World War II conducting anti-shipping operations in the Skaggerak. On 18–19 November 1939, Hans Lody took part in offensive mining operations off the Humber Estuary alongside fellow destroyers Erich Steinbrinck and Friedrich Eckoldt that resulted in the sinking of seven ships totaling 38710 tons.[1] Another mining operation off Cromer on 6–7 December with Erich Giese resulted in the sinking of two ships and the damaging of one more.[2] Hans Lody was part of the force in Operation Juno, a sortie against British transports evacuating troops from Harstad.[3] Hans Lody participated in several sorties into the English Channel, one of which, on 28–29 November 1940, resulted in an action with the British 5th Destroyer Flotilla. During that engagement, HMS Javelin was torpedoed twice and lost its bow and stern.[4]

Hans Lody was one of the destroyers attached to Operation Rösselsprung, a planned German attack on convoy PQ-17. However, Hans Lody and several other ships ran aground and the raiders never reached the convoy.[5] The ship also took part in Operation Zitronella, a German raid on Spitzbergen.[6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Rohwer pg. 7
  2. ^ Rohwer pg. 9
  3. ^ Rohwer pg. 22
  4. ^ Rohwer pg. 44
  5. ^ Rohwer pg. 147
  6. ^ Rohwer pg. 230

References[edit]

  • Gröner, Erich (1990). German Warships: 1815–1945. Volume 1: Major Surface Warships. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-790-9. 
  • Haarr, Geirr H. (2009). The German Invasion of Norway, April 1940. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-1-59114-310-9. 
  • Koop, Gerhard; Schmolke, Klaus-Peter (2003). German Destroyers of World War II. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-307-1. 
  • Rohwer, Jürgen (2005). Chronology of the War at Sea 1939-1945: The Naval History of World War Two (Third Revised ed.). Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2. 
  • Whitley, M. J. (1991). German Destroyers of World War Two. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-302-8. 

External links[edit]