German submarine U-1063

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Career
Name: U-1063
Ordered: 14 October 1941
Builder: Germaniawerft, Kiel
Yard number: 700
Laid down: 17 Aug 1943
Launched: 8 June 1944
Commissioned: 8 July 1944
Fate: Sunk, 15 April 1945
General characteristics
Type: Type VIIC/41 submarine
Displacement: 769 long tons (781 t) surfaced
871 long tons (885 t) submerged
Length: 67.23 m (220 ft 7 in) o/a
50.9 m (167 ft 0 in) pressure hull
Beam: 6.85 m (22 ft 6 in) o/a
5 m (16 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Draft: 5 m (16 ft 5 in)
Propulsion: 2 × supercharged Germaniawerft 6-cylinder, 4-stroke F46 diesels totalling 2,800–3,200 hp (2,100–2,400 kW). Max rpm: 470-490
2 × electric motors, totalling 750 shp (560 kW) and max rpm: 296
Speed: 17.7 knots (32.8 km/h; 20.4 mph) surfaced
7.6 knots (14.1 km/h; 8.7 mph) submerged
Range: 15,170 km (8,190 nmi) at 10 kn (19 km/h) surfaced
150 km (81 nmi) at 4 kn (7.4 km/h) submerged
Test depth: 230 m (750 ft)
Calculated crush depth: 250–295 m (820–968 ft)
Complement: 44-52 officers & ratings
Armament: 5 × 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (4 bow, 1 stern)
14 × torpedoes
1 × 8.8 cm (3.46 in) deck gun (220 rounds)
Service record
Part of: 5th U-boat Flotilla
(8 July 1944–28 February 1945)
11th U-boat Flotilla
(1 March 1945–15 April 1945)
Commanders: Kptlt. Karl-Heinz Stephan
(8 July 1944–15 April 1945)
Operations: 1st patrol: 11 March 1945–15 April 1945
Victories: None

German submarine U-1063 was a Type VIIC/41 submarine of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II. Her keel was laid down on 17 August 1943 by Germaniawerft in Kiel. She was commissioned on 8 July 1944 with Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Stephan in command.

Fate[edit]

On her first patrol U-1063 was sunk on 15 April 1945 in the English Channel west of Land's End, south of Bigbury, Devon, in position 50°08′54″N 03°53′24″W / 50.14833°N 3.89000°W / 50.14833; -3.89000, by squid depth charges from the British frigate HMS Loch Killin. 29 of the crew were killed, there were 17 survivors.

She now lies at a depth of 58 metres (190 ft).

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