German submarine U-1065

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Career
Name: U-1065
Ordered: 14 September 1941[1]
Builder: Krupp Germaniawerft AG, Kiel[1]
Laid down: 23 September 1943[1]
Launched: 3 August 1944[1]
Commissioned: 23 September 1944[1]
Fate: Sunk in air attack north-west of Gothenburg, Sweden on 9 April 1945[2]
General characteristics (VIIC/41)[3]
Class and type: Type VIIC/41 submarine
Displacement: 759 tonnes (747 long tons) surfaced
860 t (846 long tons) submerged
Length: 67.10 m (220 ft 2 in) o/a
50.5 m (165 ft 8 in) pressure hull
Beam: 6.20 m (20 ft 4 in) o/a
4.70 m (15 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Draft: 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in)
Propulsion: 2 × supercharged Germaniawerft 6-cylinder, 4-stroke F46 diesel engines totalling 2,800–3,200 hp (2,100–2,400 kW). Max rpm: 470-490
2 × electric motors, totalling 750 shp (560 kW) and max rpm: 296
Speed: 17.7 knots (32.8 km/h; 20.4 mph) surfaced
7.6 knots (14.1 km/h; 8.7 mph) submerged
Range: 8,500 nmi (15,700 km; 9,800 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
80 nmi (150 km; 92 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth: 230 m (750 ft)
Calculated crush depth: 250–295 m (820–968 ft)
Complement: 44-52 officers & ratings
Armament:
Service record
Part of: 5th U-boat Flotilla
(23 September 1944–9 April 1945)
Commanders: Oberleutnant zur See Johannes Panitz
(23 September 1944–9 April 1945)
Operations: 1st patrol: 4 April 1945–9 April 1945

German submarine U-1065 was a Type VIIC/41 U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

She was ordered on 14 September 1941, and was laid down on 23 September 1943 at Krupp Germaniawerft, Kiel, as 'werk 702'. She was launched on 3 August 1944 and commissioned under the command of Oberleutnant zur See Johannes Panitz on 23 September of that year.[2][3]

Service record[edit]

U-1065 had a very short career. While she was commissioned on 23 September 1944, she was not assigned to a flotilla until 1 April 1945. She spent the intervening six months training with the 5th U-boat Flotilla. At the end of her training, she was formally assigned to the same flotilla. She began her first patrol on 4 April 1945, but was sunk after only six days at sea.[2]

First patrol[edit]

U-1065's first patrol took her from her home port of Kiel in northern Germany towards occupied Norway.[2] However, while en route to Norway in company with another of the Flotilla's boats, U-804, the two submarines were detected and attacked in the Skagerrak strait by 34 de Havilland Mosquito aircraft from three separate Royal Air Force squadrons.[4] During the attack, U-1065 was able to shoot down one of the Mosquitos with her anti-aircraft guns. However, she was then hit by several rockets from 10 separate Mosquitos from 143 and 235 Squadron; she exploded and sank with the loss of her entire crew of 45 men.[2][4]

The accompanying vessel, U-804, was also hit by rockets from the Mosquitos during the altercation. She exploded and rapidly sank with the loss of her entire crew of 55 men.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "U-1065 Type VIIC/41". ubootwaffe.net. Retrieved 2 March 2010. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b c d e Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-1065". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2 March 2010. 
  3. ^ a b Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-Boat War in World War II: Type VIIC/41". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2 March 2010. 
  4. ^ a b Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-Boat War in World War II: U-boat successes against aircraft". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2 March 2010. 
  5. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-Boat War in World War II: U-804". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2 March 2010. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945. Der U-Boot-Krieg (in German) IV (Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler). ISBN 3-8132-0514-2. 
  • Gröner, Erich (1985). U-Boote, Hilfskreuzer, Minenschiffe, Netzleger, Sperrbrecher. Die deutschen Kriegsschiffe 1815-1945 (in German) III (Koblenz: Bernard & Graefe). ISBN 3-7637-4802-4. 
  • Williamson, Gordon (2006). Wolfpack. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1-84603-141-9. 

Coordinates: 57°48′N 11°26′E / 57.800°N 11.433°E / 57.800; 11.433